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San Joaquin Tollway

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 18, 1992 | JEFFREY A. PERLMAN, TIMES URBAN AFFAIRS WRITER
Twenty years in the making, the $1-billion San Joaquin Hills tollway goes before the California Coastal Commission today for one of the final permits needed to build the 17.5-mile project. And that puts Huntington Beach City Councilwoman Linda Moulton-Patterson on the spot. Moulton-Patterson is the only Orange County resident on the 12-member panel, which rarely goes against a member on matters affecting her home turf.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 6, 2011 | By Nicole Santa Cruz, Los Angeles Times
Drivers on the San Joaquin Hills toll road through western Orange County could be paying tolls for an extra six years under a proposed agreement that would restructure about $430 million of its $2.1 billion in debt. The agreement is asking bondholders to lower payments for 13 years and restructure the way the agency pays interest on certain bonds. An agreement, which would push back the bond maturity dates by six years, to 2042, is expected in two weeks. "Basically … what we're trying to do is be proactive about the way we manage finances here at the agency," said Tom Margro, chief executive of the Transportation Corridor Agencies, which also operates the Foothill and Eastern toll roads, which includes a portion of the 133 Freeway.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 12, 1989 | JEFFREY A. PERLMAN, Times Urban Affairs Writer
A proposed new design for the 14-mile tollway linking Newport Beach and San Juan Capistrano calls for commuter trains in the median strip, as well as Orange County's first reversible car-pool lanes, which would route cars in either direction, depending on traffic. The preliminary design plan for the San Joaquin Hills tollway, which still would include three regular traffic lanes in each direction, will come before the agency overseeing the $556-million project on Thursday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 6, 2002 | DAN WEIKEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Officials of the successful Foothill-Eastern tollway Wednesday agreed to consider a merger with the financially ailing San Joaquin Hills toll road--a sister highway that might not be able to meet its debts if nothing is done. The operations and finance committee for the east Orange County turnpike recommended the dramatic move based on economic studies that show a consolidation might be the best way to keep the San Joaquin Hills tollway solvent.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 29, 1990 | BILL BILLITER
The boards governing three proposed toll roads in Orange County voted Thursday to pursue what they see as a streamlined approach in constructing two of the tollways. The so-called "design/build" approach, according to the staff of the tollways boards, could result in lower costs and quicker completion of the highways. The concept calls for having one overall contractor handle most of the design work and then immediately proceed to construction.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 25, 1991 | JEFFREY A. PERLMAN, TIMES URBAN AFFAIRS WRITER
The Mission Viejo Co. has agreed to pay the county $34 million to close out its obligations for road and tollway construction in Aliso Viejo in exchange for approval to build the last phase of 2,700 homes there. Those homes have been in legal limbo because the county could not approve construction until the company fulfilled its contract to provide road improvements, including money for the San Joaquin Hills tollway. The 2,700 homes will not be built for five to 10 years, Mission Viejo Co.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 9, 1990
It appears Laguna Beach has been given an ultimatum: Either the city adamantly approves the construction of the San Joaquin Hills Tollway through its beautiful Laguna Canyon or the city will suffer the loss of a $10-million contribution offered by the county toward the $78-million purchase of Laguna Canyon. Elected officials should not be permitted to apply political pressure on any city to carry out their foolish policies and programs. The whole question of protecting Laguna Canyon from major development has for three decades been controversial.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 15, 1993 | JEFFREY A. PERLMAN, TIMES URBAN AFFAIRS WRITER
After years of turmoil, construction on Orange County's most controversial highway--the San Joaquin Hills Transportation Corridor--is likely to begin this Saturday, officials said. The announcement by tollway officials drew an immediate protest from Joel Reynolds, attorney for the Natural Resources Defense Council, a national environmental group that has sued to block construction of the 17.5-mile toll road between Newport Beach and San Juan Capistrano, parallel to Interstate 5.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 14, 1990 | ERIC BAILEY
A public hearing tonight will focus on the environmental failings and merits of the proposed San Joaquin Hills tollway, which would cut through some of Orange County's most ecologically sensitive terrain but also promises to help ease the region's pressing traffic woes. Several groups opposed to the project say they will attend the hearing and some promise to picket the meeting.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 15, 1992
Every morning and evening, a flood of traffic hastens across the San Diego Creek channel not far from the UC Irvine campus right by Upper Newport Bay. The beauty of the setting and the urgency of that daily commute hint at a larger conflict symbolized by the site. It has to do with the stress of preserving what makes Orange County's coastal areas beautiful and alleviating some of the worst traffic congestion in the state. The reason is that the 17.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 2000 | MEGAN GARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a move described as "absolutely critical" for the financial stability of the San Joaquin Hills tollway, officials on Thursday took the unprecedented step of setting aside nearly $40 million in savings to guarantee debt payments and appease concerned bond rating agencies. From the start, traffic on the 3 1/2-year-old road has lagged far behind projections, as much as 40% off original forecasts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 28, 1997 | FRANK MESSINA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Running late for an afternoon business appointment in Mission Viejo, Joseph Roth glanced anxiously at his watch and braced himself for the inevitable sea of brake lights at the dreaded El Toro Y. "I thought I was dead in the water as far as making my appointment," the Anaheim resident recalled recently as he stopped for gas. "Then I drove through the Y without even touching my brakes once. It was weird, it was kind of like the 'Twilight Zone.'
BUSINESS
January 10, 1997 | JOHN O'DELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bursts of industrial and retail construction, coupled with continuing growth in the office market, should give Orange County's commercial development industry its best year in nearly a decade, a major commercial real estate firm said Thursday. In a forecast for the coming year, market specialists for Grubb & Ellis Co.'
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 8, 1996 | THAO HUA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Heidi Nov usually isn't lead-footed. She drives a Mercedes station wagon for its safety, straps her 6-year-old in the back seat and hasn't had a ticket for nine years. But earlier this month, the San Joaquin Hills Transportation Corridor got the best of her. When her speedometer hit 75, the CHP officer was right behind her. Nov isn't alone.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 19, 1996 | DAVID HALDANE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Beginning Wednesday, rush-hour commuters traveling between Laguna Niguel and Laguna Canyon Road should be able to make that stretch in less than seven minutes compared with the usual 35. With the first seven-mile stretch of the new San Joaquin Hills tollway opening, transportation officials say, this alternative route to the San Diego Freeway should be a snap.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 26, 1995 | MARK I. PINSKY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the latest legal zigzag over the San Joaquin Hills Transportation Corridor, a federal appeals court ruled Wednesday that construction may continue, lifting its own earlier ban on the work. "This is wonderful news," said Lisa Telles, spokeswoman for the Transportation Corridor Agencies. "I can tell you that the plan right now is to look at the decision (today) and, with the rain, see what we can do. Obviously, with the rain you can't do a lot of work. Once it dries up, we will start working."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 17, 1991
Congratulations to staff writers Eric Bailey and Jeffrey Perlman on their stories about the proposed San Joaquin Hills tollway (Feb. 10). The tollway is a billion-dollar boondoggle designed not to relieve present unbearable traffic congestion but to facilitate further overdevelopment of south Orange County by two marauding giants, the Irvine and Mission Viejo companies. The key piece of information provided by The Times is this: "Along the San Joaquin Hills route alone, 105,000 new homes are expected, as well as 54.7 million square feet of industrial and commercial development."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 30, 1994 | HOLLY J. WAGNER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A group of Newport Beach and Laguna Beach residents has sued the San Joaquin Hills Transportation Corridor Agency to block the conversion of a 1.4-mile section of Newport Coast Drive to a tollway. In a lawsuit filed Thursday in Orange County Superior Court, the Newport Coast Drive Defense Fund alleges that the agency has no authority to impose a 50-cent toll on a road being paid for with property taxes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 13, 1994 | FRANK MESSINA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Environmental activists who had considered taking legal action instead conceded Tuesday that the San Joaquin Hills Transportation Agency is not violating a judge's order by resuming work here on a segment of a controversial toll road project. "We've got people with cameras out there photographing the site and running to the nearest Fotomat," said Robert King, a spokesman for the environmental group Save Our San Juan, also known as SOS.
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