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San Joaquin Transportation Corridor

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 7, 1988
Orange County was recently rated the nation's eighth-most-desirable community. If the San Joaquin Transportation Corridor is permitted, it will surely plunge Orange County to the bottom. This boondoggle of a highway is clearly conceived as developers' access to proposed housing developments, peddled as a traffic cure. Years to come, some say people may avoid Orange County as a pestilential plague. If this freeway madness continues, and you and I in dreamless apathy don't stop this freeway monster, we will not only be the victims--we will by default be the perpetrators.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 6, 2002 | DAN WEIKEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The financial picture for the struggling San Joaquin Hills toll road in west Orange County worsened Tuesday, when a major Wall Street ratings agency downgraded more than $1 billion in bonds to junk status because traffic and revenue continue to fall short of projections. Citing higher potential risks for investors, New York-based Fitch IBCA lowered the rating for more than half of the tollway's $1.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 11, 1990 | WENDY PAULSON
Public comments on the proposed route of the San Joaquin Transportation Corridor are welcomed at a hearing tonight at the City Council meeting. The biggest impact of the proposed tollway on the city is its junction with Avery Parkway, near the border of San Juan Capistrano, Laguna Niguel and Mission Viejo. The tollway route extends the Corona del Mar Freeway to Avery Parkway on a corridor that would cut through the coastal foothills.
NEWS
December 10, 1994 | MICHAEL GRANBERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lida Lenney looks at the Orange County bond scandal and admits to more than a bit of wishful thinking. For the scandal may accomplish what court hearings or protesters perched in front of bulldozers never could, she said with a smile. It could stop construction of a toll road through her beloved Laguna Canyon, which falls right in the path of the proposed San Joaquin Transportation Corridor, linking San Juan Capistrano with Newport Beach. Like county officials who shake their heads and say, "I don't know," when asked to assess the impact of the bond crisis, Lenney has no idea what the ultimate effect will be. But she and other opponents of the proposed toll road--as well as equally fierce foes of a proposed international airport at the El Toro Marine Corps Air Station--admitted Friday to feeling a perverse sense of pleasure over a bizarre political breakthrough that none anticipated, even in their wildest dreams.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 8, 1988
Election time in Irvine, and the real estate interests and pals of big developers are at it again. Just two years ago, in the city's last council race, Orange County's landed gentry propped up a fly-by-night political action committee, Irvine Citizens for Responsible Government, to front their viewpoint. Based in Newport Beach, this PAC proclaimed that communists, weirdos and perverts were about to take over the city government! Irvine would soon be a socialist state! A vote for the Irvine Co. is a vote for America!
NEWS
December 10, 1994 | MICHAEL GRANBERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lida Lenney looks at the Orange County bond scandal and admits to more than a bit of wishful thinking. For the scandal may accomplish what court hearings or protesters perched in front of bulldozers never could, she said with a smile. It could stop construction of a toll road through her beloved Laguna Canyon, which falls right in the path of the proposed San Joaquin Transportation Corridor, linking San Juan Capistrano with Newport Beach. Like county officials who shake their heads and say, "I don't know," when asked to assess the impact of the bond crisis, Lenney has no idea what the ultimate effect will be. But she and other opponents of the proposed toll road--as well as equally fierce foes of a proposed international airport at the El Toro Marine Corps Air Station--admitted Friday to feeling a perverse sense of pleasure over a bizarre political breakthrough that none anticipated, even in their wildest dreams.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 8, 1992 | JEFFREY A. PERLMAN
The U.S. Senate gave Orange County's financially strapped Transportation Corridor Agencies a big present this week--the promise of a federal loan if the planned San Joaquin Hills tollway fails financially. But the House of Representatives was not as generous, so differences will have to be resolved in a House-Senate conference committee not expected to meet until after Labor Day.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 9, 1993 | RICHARD CORE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Bulldozers will start carving the path of the San Joaquin Hills tollway this morning, officials said, about 20 years after the project was proposed to move traffic through South County. Mike Stockstill, spokesman for the San Joaquin Hills Transportation Corridor Agency, said Wednesday that two bulldozers and other heavy equipment would start work near Greenfield Drive, in the southern portion of the proposed 17.5-mile corridor.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 1994 | ELAINE TASSY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Qudsia Roston opened her Montessori school here 22 years ago, she planned to never leave. But now, Roston, her students, and the resident horse, rabbit and bird may be forced to move. The school on Rancho Viejo Road that for so long has been trafficked by children must make way for cars--actually, a toll road called the San Joaquin Hills Transportation Corridor.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 6, 2002 | DAN WEIKEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The financial picture for the struggling San Joaquin Hills toll road in west Orange County worsened Tuesday, when a major Wall Street ratings agency downgraded more than $1 billion in bonds to junk status because traffic and revenue continue to fall short of projections. Citing higher potential risks for investors, New York-based Fitch IBCA lowered the rating for more than half of the tollway's $1.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 1994 | ELAINE TASSY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Qudsia Roston opened her Montessori school here 22 years ago, she planned to never leave. But now, Roston, her students, and the resident horse, rabbit and bird may be forced to move. The school on Rancho Viejo Road that for so long has been trafficked by children must make way for cars--actually, a toll road called the San Joaquin Hills Transportation Corridor.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 9, 1993 | RICHARD CORE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Bulldozers will start carving the path of the San Joaquin Hills tollway this morning, officials said, about 20 years after the project was proposed to move traffic through South County. Mike Stockstill, spokesman for the San Joaquin Hills Transportation Corridor Agency, said Wednesday that two bulldozers and other heavy equipment would start work near Greenfield Drive, in the southern portion of the proposed 17.5-mile corridor.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 8, 1992 | JEFFREY A. PERLMAN
The U.S. Senate gave Orange County's financially strapped Transportation Corridor Agencies a big present this week--the promise of a federal loan if the planned San Joaquin Hills tollway fails financially. But the House of Representatives was not as generous, so differences will have to be resolved in a House-Senate conference committee not expected to meet until after Labor Day.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 11, 1990 | WENDY PAULSON
Public comments on the proposed route of the San Joaquin Transportation Corridor are welcomed at a hearing tonight at the City Council meeting. The biggest impact of the proposed tollway on the city is its junction with Avery Parkway, near the border of San Juan Capistrano, Laguna Niguel and Mission Viejo. The tollway route extends the Corona del Mar Freeway to Avery Parkway on a corridor that would cut through the coastal foothills.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 7, 1988
Orange County was recently rated the nation's eighth-most-desirable community. If the San Joaquin Transportation Corridor is permitted, it will surely plunge Orange County to the bottom. This boondoggle of a highway is clearly conceived as developers' access to proposed housing developments, peddled as a traffic cure. Years to come, some say people may avoid Orange County as a pestilential plague. If this freeway madness continues, and you and I in dreamless apathy don't stop this freeway monster, we will not only be the victims--we will by default be the perpetrators.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 8, 1988
Election time in Irvine, and the real estate interests and pals of big developers are at it again. Just two years ago, in the city's last council race, Orange County's landed gentry propped up a fly-by-night political action committee, Irvine Citizens for Responsible Government, to front their viewpoint. Based in Newport Beach, this PAC proclaimed that communists, weirdos and perverts were about to take over the city government! Irvine would soon be a socialist state! A vote for the Irvine Co. is a vote for America!
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 11, 2000 | Dana Bushee, (714) 966-5636
New Laguna Woods signs have been installed on the San Joaquin Transportation Corridor to help mark the entrance to the city. Trailblazer signs, which direct traffic off exit ramps, were placed on the El Toro Road ramp and directional signs were also installed on the toll road. Doug Reilly, the city's administration services director, said signs on Interstate 5 will also be replaced with larger signs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 24, 1985
As residents of Irvine, we all know how difficult it is becoming to get from our homes every day. Commuters bypass congested freeways and search out Irvine streets in the hope of a quicker trip. There is an alternative. The San Joaquin Hills Transportation Corridor will route traffic around the city. At its closest point to Irvine homes, it will be nearly one mile away. The corridor will ease traffic on such major Irvine thoroughfares as University and Irvine Center drives.
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