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San Joaquin Valley Agriculture

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NEWS
September 18, 1992 | DONNA K. H. WALTERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The voracious strain B whitefly has moved into the San Joaquin Valley, the most fertile and productive agricultural area in the state. If the whiteflies stay there over the winter they could pose a serious threat to millions of dollars worth of crops next spring and summer.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 1, 2003 | Gary Polakovic, Times Staff Writer
Conflict over air quality in the smoggy San Joaquin Valley erupted anew this week as clean-air advocates filed a lawsuit accusing the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency of exempting major agricultural polluters from a new dust-control requirement. It is the sixth lawsuit in the past few years against air-quality agencies that have fallen far behind federally mandated clean-air goals for the valley.
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NEWS
April 12, 1991
Up to $2 million in emergency food assistance to aid needy San Joaquin Valley families hit by last winter's crop-killing freeze will be provided by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the federal agency announced. Jobless residents of Tulare, Fresno and Kern counties will be the first to receive allocations of canned goods and dairy products from government storehouses without regard to possible alien status, the USDA said. Sen. John Seymour (R-Calif.
NEWS
June 14, 1999 | MARK ARAX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The San Joaquin Valley, one foot stuck in suburbia and the other foot still firmly planted in its agricultural past, is a place full of odd little clashes. There are the Hmong aborigines from the highlands of Laos growing big, fat strawberries at the town's edge, their tiny farms about to be gobbled up by suburban sprawl. There are busy streets full of commerce suddenly stopped dead by an irrigation canal shunting water to distant farms.
NEWS
September 6, 1989
Assemblyman Gary A. Condit (D-Ceres) will get a seat on the House Agriculture Committee if he wins a Sept. 12 special election for a vacant congressional seat, House Majority Leader Richard A. Gebhardt (D-Mo.) said in Fresno. San Joaquin Valley farm interests traditionally have had a seat on the powerful committee.
NEWS
August 18, 1993 | PETER H. KING
To drive across the San Joaquin Valley is to doubt the premise that prime farmland is disappearing under the developers' bulldozers. Cotton fields, fruit orchards and vines run unbroken for mile after monotonous mile. Back roads are clogged with trucks hauling tomatoes and hay. Makeshift fruit stands can be found at every rural corner. No, a whole lot of farming still goes on in this valley and, at a glance anyway, it seems as though it ought to last forever.
NEWS
December 17, 1993 | MARLA CONE, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
Their lives are a never-ending battle with fruit flies and droughts, falling prices and untimely frosts. But to farmers of the San Joaquin Valley, few foes are as intimidating as the tiny kit foxes, lizards and other endangered species that share California's fertile heartland with them. For nearly 1,200 farmers and ranchers between Madera and Kern counties, the fear has grown since July, when they received letters from the federal government. In an unprecedented request, the U.S.
NEWS
March 30, 1993 | MARK ARAX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Under threat of government action, farmers in the west San Joaquin Valley have begun to acknowledge their role in the deaths of tens of thousands of migratory birds and to consider steps to prevent further wildlife damage. For the past decade, farmers have discounted the effects on wildlife from two dozen artificial lakes brimming with the toxic drainage of cotton and tomato fields.
BUSINESS
October 9, 1992 | DONNA K. H. WALTERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Last May, cotton grower Mark Borba took it as a personal promise when President Bush, meeting with Central Valley farmers in a raisin shed outside of Fresno, said he wouldn't accept a water reform package if Congress passed it. Well, Congress passed it all right, and now Borba--who put the question to the President at last spring's gathering--is hoping for a veto.
NEWS
July 29, 1997 | MARK ARAX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An elaborate deal to move San Joaquin River water from the farms of this heartland to the suburbs of Los Angeles has erupted into California's version of a nasty civil war. It pits L.A.'s Metropolitan Water District and big farmers in the southern San Joaquin Valley on one side against farming giants to the north and Bay Area environmentalists. The south says the $45-million water transfer is a win-win, benefiting urban users in Southern California and fruit and vegetable growers in Kern County.
NEWS
July 29, 1997 | MARK ARAX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An elaborate deal to move San Joaquin River water from the farms of this heartland to the suburbs of Los Angeles has erupted into California's version of a nasty civil war. It pits L.A.'s Metropolitan Water District and big farmers in the southern San Joaquin Valley on one side against farming giants to the north and Bay Area environmentalists. The south says the $45-million water transfer is a win-win, benefiting urban users in Southern California and fruit and vegetable growers in Kern County.
NEWS
June 12, 1995 | MARK ARAX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For 20 years the vineyards and fruit orchards that surround this small San Joaquin Valley town were saturated each season with a chemical that gave farmers a quick and easy fix. The soil fumigant DBCP killed the tiny, pesky worms that suck the life out of roots, with dramatic results. "I can remember standing in back of my pickup and I could see right down to the row where I had used it and where I hadn't," grape grower Norm Waldner said.
NEWS
December 17, 1993 | MARLA CONE, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
Their lives are a never-ending battle with fruit flies and droughts, falling prices and untimely frosts. But to farmers of the San Joaquin Valley, few foes are as intimidating as the tiny kit foxes, lizards and other endangered species that share California's fertile heartland with them. For nearly 1,200 farmers and ranchers between Madera and Kern counties, the fear has grown since July, when they received letters from the federal government. In an unprecedented request, the U.S.
NEWS
August 18, 1993 | PETER H. KING
To drive across the San Joaquin Valley is to doubt the premise that prime farmland is disappearing under the developers' bulldozers. Cotton fields, fruit orchards and vines run unbroken for mile after monotonous mile. Back roads are clogged with trucks hauling tomatoes and hay. Makeshift fruit stands can be found at every rural corner. No, a whole lot of farming still goes on in this valley and, at a glance anyway, it seems as though it ought to last forever.
NEWS
March 30, 1993 | MARK ARAX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Under threat of government action, farmers in the west San Joaquin Valley have begun to acknowledge their role in the deaths of tens of thousands of migratory birds and to consider steps to prevent further wildlife damage. For the past decade, farmers have discounted the effects on wildlife from two dozen artificial lakes brimming with the toxic drainage of cotton and tomato fields.
BUSINESS
October 9, 1992 | DONNA K. H. WALTERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Last May, cotton grower Mark Borba took it as a personal promise when President Bush, meeting with Central Valley farmers in a raisin shed outside of Fresno, said he wouldn't accept a water reform package if Congress passed it. Well, Congress passed it all right, and now Borba--who put the question to the President at last spring's gathering--is hoping for a veto.
NEWS
May 29, 1990 | ROBERT A. JONES
There may be, as the Tourist Bureau claims, many "Californias." But, in truth, only three really count: the empire of Los Angeles; the empire of the Bay Area; and the empire of the San Joaquin Valley. These are the true "Californias," and they have ruled the state for most of this century. This triad is all the more interesting because, every few decades, a tectonic shift takes place and the balance of power is forever altered.
NEWS
March 7, 1991 | MILES CORWIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Flush your toilet twice and you've used up your daily water allotment. Take a shower and you've used it up for two days. Do a few loads of laundry and there goes your water for a week. In the small San Joaquin Valley town of Orange Cove, water cutbacks have been so severe that residents have been advised to use no more than 10 gallons a day. The average Los Angeles resident uses more than 10 times that amount.
NEWS
September 18, 1992 | DONNA K. H. WALTERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The voracious strain B whitefly has moved into the San Joaquin Valley, the most fertile and productive agricultural area in the state. If the whiteflies stay there over the winter they could pose a serious threat to millions of dollars worth of crops next spring and summer.
NEWS
April 12, 1991
Up to $2 million in emergency food assistance to aid needy San Joaquin Valley families hit by last winter's crop-killing freeze will be provided by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the federal agency announced. Jobless residents of Tulare, Fresno and Kern counties will be the first to receive allocations of canned goods and dairy products from government storehouses without regard to possible alien status, the USDA said. Sen. John Seymour (R-Calif.
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