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San Joaquin Valley Development And Redevelopment

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NEWS
July 19, 1990 | LARRY GORDON, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
On an immense, dusty pasture about seven miles north of Merced, community activist Bob Carpenter envisions classrooms, dormitories, a library and a gym. For some walnut groves and cotton fields just outside Visalia, city official Michael Ramsey imagines world-famous laboratories and computer centers. Along the gently sloping foothills between Fresno and the snow-capped Sierra, a university of great scholars could rise, local banker Leo Lutz predicts.
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NEWS
August 18, 1993 | PETER H. KING
To drive across the San Joaquin Valley is to doubt the premise that prime farmland is disappearing under the developers' bulldozers. Cotton fields, fruit orchards and vines run unbroken for mile after monotonous mile. Back roads are clogged with trucks hauling tomatoes and hay. Makeshift fruit stands can be found at every rural corner. No, a whole lot of farming still goes on in this valley and, at a glance anyway, it seems as though it ought to last forever.
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NEWS
August 18, 1993 | PETER H. KING
To drive across the San Joaquin Valley is to doubt the premise that prime farmland is disappearing under the developers' bulldozers. Cotton fields, fruit orchards and vines run unbroken for mile after monotonous mile. Back roads are clogged with trucks hauling tomatoes and hay. Makeshift fruit stands can be found at every rural corner. No, a whole lot of farming still goes on in this valley and, at a glance anyway, it seems as though it ought to last forever.
NEWS
July 21, 1990 | LARRY GORDON, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
Eight rural sites in the San Joaquin Valley, including four near Fresno, were selected Friday as semifinalists in the heated competition to become home to a new University of California campus. Two areas near Modesto and others close to Merced and Porterville also were among the eight enormous tracts of farmland and ranches that will be much scrutinized over the next few months by the UC Board of Regents.
NEWS
May 29, 1990 | ROBERT A. JONES
There may be, as the Tourist Bureau claims, many "Californias." But, in truth, only three really count: the empire of Los Angeles; the empire of the Bay Area; and the empire of the San Joaquin Valley. These are the true "Californias," and they have ruled the state for most of this century. This triad is all the more interesting because, every few decades, a tectonic shift takes place and the balance of power is forever altered.
NEWS
July 21, 1990 | LARRY GORDON, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
Eight rural sites in the San Joaquin Valley, including four near Fresno, were selected Friday as semifinalists in the heated competition to become home to a new University of California campus. Two areas near Modesto and others close to Merced and Porterville also were among the eight enormous tracts of farmland and ranches that will be much scrutinized over the next few months by the UC Board of Regents.
NEWS
July 19, 1990 | LARRY GORDON, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
On an immense, dusty pasture about seven miles north of Merced, community activist Bob Carpenter envisions classrooms, dormitories, a library and a gym. For some walnut groves and cotton fields just outside Visalia, city official Michael Ramsey imagines world-famous laboratories and computer centers. Along the gently sloping foothills between Fresno and the snow-capped Sierra, a university of great scholars could rise, local banker Leo Lutz predicts.
NEWS
May 29, 1990 | ROBERT A. JONES
There may be, as the Tourist Bureau claims, many "Californias." But, in truth, only three really count: the empire of Los Angeles; the empire of the Bay Area; and the empire of the San Joaquin Valley. These are the true "Californias," and they have ruled the state for most of this century. This triad is all the more interesting because, every few decades, a tectonic shift takes place and the balance of power is forever altered.
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