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NEWS
July 19, 1990 | LARRY GORDON, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
On an immense, dusty pasture about seven miles north of Merced, community activist Bob Carpenter envisions classrooms, dormitories, a library and a gym. For some walnut groves and cotton fields just outside Visalia, city official Michael Ramsey imagines world-famous laboratories and computer centers. Along the gently sloping foothills between Fresno and the snow-capped Sierra, a university of great scholars could rise, local banker Leo Lutz predicts.
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BUSINESS
December 16, 1991 | DONNA K. H. WALTERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The sweet fragrance of hope fills the citrus groves of Central California. The navel oranges are maturing, and the harvesters are returning to work--some for the first time since a devastating freeze swept through the state nearly a year ago. Barring another disaster, it will be a good crop in California this year--a predicted 2.5 billion pounds, more than twice last year's ravaged harvest. The orange trees are mostly healthier than growers expected.
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BUSINESS
December 16, 1991 | DONNA K. H. WALTERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The sweet fragrance of hope fills the citrus groves of Central California. The navel oranges are maturing, and the harvesters are returning to work--some for the first time since a devastating freeze swept through the state nearly a year ago. Barring another disaster, it will be a good crop in California this year--a predicted 2.5 billion pounds, more than twice last year's ravaged harvest. The orange trees are mostly healthier than growers expected.
NEWS
July 19, 1990 | LARRY GORDON, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
On an immense, dusty pasture about seven miles north of Merced, community activist Bob Carpenter envisions classrooms, dormitories, a library and a gym. For some walnut groves and cotton fields just outside Visalia, city official Michael Ramsey imagines world-famous laboratories and computer centers. Along the gently sloping foothills between Fresno and the snow-capped Sierra, a university of great scholars could rise, local banker Leo Lutz predicts.
NEWS
May 29, 1990 | ROBERT A. JONES
There may be, as the Tourist Bureau claims, many "Californias." But, in truth, only three really count: the empire of Los Angeles; the empire of the Bay Area; and the empire of the San Joaquin Valley. These are the true "Californias," and they have ruled the state for most of this century. This triad is all the more interesting because, every few decades, a tectonic shift takes place and the balance of power is forever altered.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 15, 1986
Carol Burnett is set to star in a five-hour CBS miniseries next season titled "Fresno," a comic takeoff on prime-time soaps about the rival families "in the raisin capital of the world . . . who attempt to drive each other into oblivion, or Bakersfield, whichever is closer." The comedy miniseries is scheduled to air in five one-hour installments. The MTM Production, from the makers of "Newhart," has Barry Kemp as producer and Kemp, Mark Ganzel and Michael Petryni as writers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 1, 2012 | Richard Simon and Bettina Boxall
The House approved a bill Wednesday that rewrites two decades of water law in California, wiping out environmental protections and dropping reforms of federal irrigation policy that have long irritated agribusiness in the Central Valley. The legislation passed on a mostly party line vote of 246-175 in the Republican-controlled House. But its prospects of becoming law are poor. The White House has issued a veto threat, and it is unlikely to survive the Democratic-controlled Senate, where both of California's senators have vowed to work against it. "It essentially says farmers will get theirs and nothing for anybody else," said Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.)
NEWS
May 29, 1990 | ROBERT A. JONES
There may be, as the Tourist Bureau claims, many "Californias." But, in truth, only three really count: the empire of Los Angeles; the empire of the Bay Area; and the empire of the San Joaquin Valley. These are the true "Californias," and they have ruled the state for most of this century. This triad is all the more interesting because, every few decades, a tectonic shift takes place and the balance of power is forever altered.
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