Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSan Joaquin Valley Health
IN THE NEWS

San Joaquin Valley Health

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
January 30, 1992 | DAN MORAIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Taking count of the worst-ever epidemic of the strange airborne disease called valley fever, health authorities report that at least 1,000 people in three counties took ill with severe flu-like symptoms and nine died in the final months of last year. In all, the disease, found most commonly in the San Joaquin Valley and arid sections of the Southwest, struck almost 2,000 people across California last year, more than four times the 441 cases reported in 1990.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 12, 1995 | MARK ARAX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For 20 years the vineyards and fruit orchards that surround this small San Joaquin Valley town were saturated each season with a chemical that gave farmers a quick and easy fix. The soil fumigant DBCP killed the tiny, pesky worms that suck the life out of roots, with dramatic results. "I can remember standing in back of my pickup and I could see right down to the row where I had used it and where I hadn't," grape grower Norm Waldner said.
Advertisement
NEWS
June 12, 1995 | MARK ARAX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For 20 years the vineyards and fruit orchards that surround this small San Joaquin Valley town were saturated each season with a chemical that gave farmers a quick and easy fix. The soil fumigant DBCP killed the tiny, pesky worms that suck the life out of roots, with dramatic results. "I can remember standing in back of my pickup and I could see right down to the row where I had used it and where I hadn't," grape grower Norm Waldner said.
NEWS
January 30, 1992 | DAN MORAIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Taking count of the worst-ever epidemic of the strange airborne disease called valley fever, health authorities report that at least 1,000 people in three counties took ill with severe flu-like symptoms and nine died in the final months of last year. In all, the disease, found most commonly in the San Joaquin Valley and arid sections of the Southwest, struck almost 2,000 people across California last year, more than four times the 441 cases reported in 1990.
NEWS
April 24, 1995
Martin Schickman, 67, a clinical professor of cardiology and assistant dean for postgraduate education at the UCLA School of Medicine and an expert on hypertension. He also was director of the UCLA Extension Department of Continuing Education in Health Sciences and director of the UCLA portion of the Central San Joaquin Valley Area Health Education Center, a joint venture between UCLA and UC San Francisco medical schools. He also was a former president of the L.A.
NEWS
February 26, 1993 | JOHN M. BRODER and EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Clinton acknowledged for the first time Thursday that his health care reform package will require new taxes to pay for coverage of the 37 million Americans who now have no medical insurance--probably in the form of so-called "sin taxes."
Los Angeles Times Articles
|