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San Joaquin Valley Labor

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BUSINESS
January 2, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Jobless Rates Soar in San Joaquin Valley: Unemployment rates in the San Joaquin Valley soared to near-depression levels during November, according to statistics for California. Tulare County had the region's highest unemployment at 19.3%. Merced County was close behind with 19% of its people out of work.
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BUSINESS
January 2, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Jobless Rates Soar in San Joaquin Valley: Unemployment rates in the San Joaquin Valley soared to near-depression levels during November, according to statistics for California. Tulare County had the region's highest unemployment at 19.3%. Merced County was close behind with 19% of its people out of work.
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BUSINESS
June 14, 2008 | From the Associated Press
State officials are shutting down a San Joaquin Valley farm labor contractor that hired a pregnant teen who died while pruning grapes last month. Authorities suspect 17-year-old Maria Isabel Vasquez Jimenez died because Merced Farm Labor denied her proper access to shade and water even as she worked in 100-degree heat. The California Department of Industrial Relations issued the stop-work order Thursday.
BUSINESS
August 8, 2008 | Marc Lifsher, Times Staff Writer
For a decade, California employers and their advocates in Sacramento complained about the high cost of workers' compensation insurance and condemned abuses of the system by employees, who they said fake claims, exaggerate medical conditions and collect fat disability benefits. But some data suggest that employers -- not workers -- are the bigger workers' compensation cheaters. And the state is stepping up enforcement against businesses suspected of ignoring the law and endangering workers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 21, 1990 | MARC LACEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With vacation just beginning, organizations all over the South Bay are working to keep young people this summer from ever having to say: "I'm bored. There's nothing to do." Parents who have waited until the last minute to plan entertainment for their children will find that scores of classes and dozens of public and private camps still have openings.
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