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NEWS
June 7, 1992 | PETER H. KING
Somehow, that front page photo last week of John Seymour hugging Bruce Herschensohn reminded me of the Titanic, and the men who huddled together on deck as the lifeboats pulled away. "We're in this together now, John." "Yes, Bruce, I know. See you on . . . the other side." The boys have drawn rough duty. Seymour's opponent, Dianne Feinstein, appears in top form.
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NEWS
June 7, 1992 | PETER H. KING
Somehow, that front page photo last week of John Seymour hugging Bruce Herschensohn reminded me of the Titanic, and the men who huddled together on deck as the lifeboats pulled away. "We're in this together now, John." "Yes, Bruce, I know. See you on . . . the other side." The boys have drawn rough duty. Seymour's opponent, Dianne Feinstein, appears in top form.
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NEWS
January 21, 1992 | PETER H. KING
Everyone here is full of proud talk that San Jose, the place Dionne Warwick didn't know the way to, is about to be "put on the map"--to be recognized finally as a "major league city." The cause of this great civic breakthrough is a handshake agreement announced last week by Mayor Susan Hammer and Bob Lurie, owner of the San Francisco Giants. It's quite a deal.
NEWS
May 28, 1992 | JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It will cost each household about $2.90 a month--roughly the price of a Super Dog with sauerkraut. For that the people of San Jose can have their very own big league baseball team--the first-place Giants, shipped south from San Francisco, 50 miles away. Great deal, huh? It depends, of course, on your perspective.
SPORTS
January 16, 1992 | ROSS NEWHAN
There are two recurring thoughts regarding the latest possibility of the Giants' departure from Candlestick Park. The first is ongoing amazement at how sports in general--and baseball in particular--continues to foster this fantasyland in which unemployment, homelessness and an economy as uncertain as the Dodger infield don't exist. Need $155 million to help build a stadium? No problem. A raise for teachers? Have to table that one again.
SPORTS
May 25, 1991 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Keith Fowler, coach and general manager of the Rapid City (S.D.) Thrillers last season, was named general manager of the Continental Basketball Assn. franchise that moved last week from San Jose to Bakersfield.
SPORTS
May 10, 1990 | From Associated Press
The San Francisco Bay Area got an NHL franchise, and the Minnesota North Stars got new owners in a deal approved Wednesday by the league's Board of Governors. Howard Baldwin, former chairman of the Hartford Whalers, and Morris Belzberg, a retired Budget Rent-A-Car executive, acquired the North Stars from Gordon and George Gund for about $38 million. In turn, the Gunds were given a Bay Area franchise for 1991-92--the league's first expansion since four teams from the World Hockey Assn.
SPORTS
March 23, 1991 | STEVE SPRINGER
They already have sold more than half the seats in their hockey arena. They have locked up a commercial television deal for four years. And they are putting together a street hockey program involving 10,000 to 12,000 kids. Not bad for a team without players or coaches. The San Jose Sharks, newest club in the NHL, are still six months away from their first game. But the Bay Area appears already to have taken them to heart.
SPORTS
January 29, 1992 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Anti-tax pickets rallied outside San Jose's city hall to campaign against building a new baseball stadium in San Jose, calling the deal to lure the San Francisco team south "a Giant sellout."
NEWS
January 21, 1992 | PETER H. KING
Everyone here is full of proud talk that San Jose, the place Dionne Warwick didn't know the way to, is about to be "put on the map"--to be recognized finally as a "major league city." The cause of this great civic breakthrough is a handshake agreement announced last week by Mayor Susan Hammer and Bob Lurie, owner of the San Francisco Giants. It's quite a deal.
SPORTS
January 16, 1992 | ROSS NEWHAN
There are two recurring thoughts regarding the latest possibility of the Giants' departure from Candlestick Park. The first is ongoing amazement at how sports in general--and baseball in particular--continues to foster this fantasyland in which unemployment, homelessness and an economy as uncertain as the Dodger infield don't exist. Need $155 million to help build a stadium? No problem. A raise for teachers? Have to table that one again.
SPORTS
January 16, 1992 | MARTHA GROVES and THOMAS S. MULLIGAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
First baseman Will Clark of the San Francisco Giants stops in occasionally for lunch on game days at Perry's on Union Street. That's one piece of business that could head south if San Francisco's baseball team finds its way to San Jose. "This stupid city, which I love, is so narrow-minded to have let the Giants possibly get away," Perry Butler, the restaurant's owner, said Wednesday after San Jose Mayor Susan Hammer and Giant owner Bob Lurie announced a deal to send the team to the South Bay.
SPORTS
January 16, 1992 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The San Francisco Giants, who long ago lost their heart for windy Candlestick Park, found their way to San Jose Wednesday and announced a deal that could let them begin playing there by 1996. San Jose, seeking to move out of the shadow of San Francisco, agreed to put up $155 million to help finance construction of an open-air stadium seating 48,000.
SPORTS
November 19, 1991 | STEVE SPRINGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Being an expansion team is never easy. It requires the use of guile and charm as substitutes for talent in the battle for the hearts, minds and pocketbooks of the citizenry. It can be done. It has been done. But never quite the way the San Jose Sharks are doing it. A key to success for any team, expansion or otherwise, is its ability to do well at home. Not the Sharks. They haven't even been there yet. The San Jose Sharks have never played a game in San Jose.
SPORTS
January 16, 1992 | MARTHA GROVES and THOMAS S. MULLIGAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
First baseman Will Clark of the San Francisco Giants stops in occasionally for lunch on game days at Perry's on Union Street. That's one piece of business that could head south if San Francisco's baseball team finds its way to San Jose. "This stupid city, which I love, is so narrow-minded to have let the Giants possibly get away," Perry Butler, the restaurant's owner, said Wednesday after San Jose Mayor Susan Hammer and Giant owner Bob Lurie announced a deal to send the team to the South Bay.
SPORTS
January 11, 1990 | STEVE SPRINGER
The road to success for most sportscasters involves some pretty tough sledding. It certainly did for Randy Hahn. Literally. The studio host on Prime Ticket for King telecasts, Hahn began his broadcasting career with the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, doing play-by-play of dog-sled races in the Yukon. Or, as King announcer Bob Miller describes it, paw-by-paw. Hahn's partner in those dog days was the renowned commentator, Chief Van Bibber.
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