Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSan Jose Mercury News Newspaper
IN THE NEWS

San Jose Mercury News Newspaper

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
July 17, 1999 | From Associated Press
A business columnist for the San Jose Mercury News was suspended after earning $9,000 from an investment opportunity she got from a local executive. Chris Nolan, who writes the newspaper's "Talk Is Cheap" column, which focuses on the high-tech industries of Silicon Valley, expressed regrets. But she said she hadn't considered it to be a conflict of interest because the executive was a longtime friend and she had not planned to write about him because of the friendship.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
July 17, 1999 | From Associated Press
A business columnist for the San Jose Mercury News was suspended after earning $9,000 from an investment opportunity she got from a local executive. Chris Nolan, who writes the newspaper's "Talk Is Cheap" column, which focuses on the high-tech industries of Silicon Valley, expressed regrets. But she said she hadn't considered it to be a conflict of interest because the executive was a longtime friend and she had not planned to write about him because of the friendship.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 2012 | By David Ng
The legal battle over the estate of Thomas Kinkade received a hearing earlier this week in a court in San Jose, with the artist's estranged wife squaring off against Kinkade's girlfriend, who was living with him at the time of his death in April. The hearing was held to decide whether the estate fight will be held in open court or in private arbitration. Amy Pinto-Walsh, the artist's girlfriend, has submitted to the court a handwritten document that she says shows Kinkade bequeathed her his mansion and $10 million to establish a Thomas Kinkade Museum, according to the San Jose Mercury News.
NEWS
July 24, 1998 | From a Times Staff Writer
The Justice Department's internal watchdog said Thursday that he found no evidence that U.S. government officials protected a California drug-trafficking ring whose members contributed money to the Nicaraguan rebels known as the Contras during the 1980s. Inspector General Michael R.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 24, 1998 | From a Times Staff Writer
The Justice Department's internal watchdog said Thursday that he found no evidence that U.S. government officials protected a California drug-trafficking ring whose members contributed money to the Nicaraguan rebels known as the Contras during the 1980s. Inspector General Michael R.
NEWS
July 1, 1987 | LEO C. WOLINSKY, Times Staff Writer
Despite solid bipartisan support from the Legislature's top leaders, the Senate Governmental Organization Committee on Tuesday resoundingly rejected legislation that would close to public scrutiny the investigative files of the state's Fair Political Practices Commission.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 24, 1996 | DAVID WILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The chief in-house investigator at the Central Intelligence Agency told a Senate committee Wednesday that he will need more time than first expected to complete his inquiry into whether the CIA was connected with the introduction of crack cocaine to the United States. "The size of the information base that must be thoroughly reviewed . . . is enormous," CIA Inspector General Frederick P. Hitz said at a packed hearing of the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence.
SPORTS
July 24, 1990 | From Associated Press
Alameda County supervisors today approved the latest deal to lure the Raiders football team back to Oakland, but board members conceded public perception could hurt chances of success for the $127-million proposal. The board also approved a new lease agreement with the Oakland Athletics baseball team.
REAL ESTATE
October 3, 1993 | H. JANE LEHMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Lehman is a Washington, D.C., free-lance real estate writer whose work has appeared in numerous newspapers, including The Washington Post and The Times
In a free-association word test, computer does not usually leap to mind after real estate . Yet an assortment of real estate assistance and resources is available by way of computer to anyone who subscribes to one of the major on-line information services that provide a pipeline to other computer operators and instantaneous information retrieval.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 6, 1996 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES WASHINGTON BUREAU CHIEF
The Central Intelligence Agency said Tuesday that it has no record of any CIA relationship with the principal members of a Nicaraguan-American cocaine trafficking ring that operated in California during the 1980s. In a legal declaration filed in federal court in San Diego and released in Washington, the CIA said it knew as early as 1984 that cocaine smuggler Norvin Meneses was a major drug trafficker.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|