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San Juan Capistrano Ca History

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 1995 | FRANK MESSINA
With a going-away tune from a singing cowboy and blessings from the Mission San Juan ringing in their ears, 200 horsemen rode through the downtown streets of San Juan Capistrano and out into the wilderness on Friday. A celebration of South County's original Spanish settlers and massive exercise in male bonding, the 32nd annual Viaje de Portola will make a 30-mile circle over about three days.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 27, 2001 | DAVID HALDANE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Forget the swallows. Mission San Juan Capistrano will be raided by pirates today in a fierce battle re-creating an event from 183 years ago. Actors dressed as ragged buccaneers will storm the gates, while others portraying Spanish soldiers will repel them. The 7-year-old event is the brainchild of Gerald J. Miller, executive director of the mission and a lifelong history buff. "We've had lots of very interesting things happen at the mission," he said.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 9, 1996 | LEN HALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Above the door of the clapboard farmhouse near Trabuco Creek, behind the stacks of firewood of eucalyptus, pine, ash and sycamore, the sign reads "Since 1868, Rosenbaum Ranch." The current proprietor is 72-year-old Mel Rosenbaum, a member of a pioneer family that is among the elite in centuries-old San Juan Capistrano. But the Rosenbaums also share several slices of local history that, even here, are known by few.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 26, 1999 | DAVID HALDANE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tiny Serra Chapel is powerful evidence of the cultural foundations of Orange County. The adobe and wood-beamed church at Mission San Juan Capistrano, where Father Junipero Serra first said Mass in 1778, is one of the oldest buildings in California. Its walls are covered with a hybrid of artistic designs; wispy Native American swirls in red and yellow framed by somber portraits of the saints depicted in regal Spanish passion.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 25, 1991 | LEN HALL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When gallery owner Sue DiMaio began renovating the 19th-Century home of Judge Richard Egan, she was ready for anything--except what she found. Clearing out the basement of the 1880s-era home, workers uncovered the remnants of a long-sealed tunnel that appears to snake off under Camino Capistrano, the downtown roadway that used to be called El Camino Real.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 29, 1990 | LEN HALL
A 98-year-old walnut Estey Reed organ now sits in the Serra Chapel at Mission San Juan Capistrano, just as it did for about 30 years earlier this century. The organ arrived by truck last month as a gift from the estate of Maureen Sutton of Washington, who had reportedly bought it from a Santa Ana antique dealer. That's when Nick Magalousis, the mission's museum director, enlisted the help of mission archivist Charles A.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 1997 | KIMBERLY BROWER
Some of the city's historical buildings were fitted Monday with bronze plaques recognizing their architectural excellence and contribution to the community's cultural heritage. Crews fastened inscribed plaques on 20 landmarks throughout town, among them the Combs House and Montanez Adobe in the Los Rios Historic District and Mission San Juan Capistrano and the Depot downtown. "It's really exciting," Mechelle Lawrence, economic development administrator for the city, said of the project.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 6, 1999 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Feeling stressed out? Tired of the old bumper-to-bumper on the 405, the 5, the 55, the 57 the 22 and the 91? Had enough of strip malls, mini-malls, mega-malls, fast-food franchises and cookie-cutter homes?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 6, 1999 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Feeling stressed out? Tired of the old bumper-to-bumper on the 405, the 5, the 55, the 57 the 22 and the 91? Had enough of strip malls, mini-malls, mega-malls, fast-food franchises and cookie-cutter homes?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 1998 | SUSAN DEEMER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The original painted decorations inside the dome of the Great Stone Church at Mission San Juan Capistrano, seen by few people since an 1812 earthquake heavily damaged the church, are finally being studied and preserved. Mission officials have taken samples of the paint from the 13 depictions of fruit, vegetables and other designs to the University of Pennsylvania for analysis. They plan to treat the artworks with chemicals to bring out their colors and preserve them.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 20, 1997 | SUSAN DEEMER
A new seven-member ad hoc committee, assigned to update the 19-year-old Los Rios Precise Plan, was appointed this week by the City Council. The plan is a blueprint to guide development in the sensitive 220-year-old historic neighborhood near the Mission San Juan Capistrano. The council decided Tuesday to review the plan since owners of some adobe homes have begun seeking permits to serve alcohol or transform cottages into bed-and-breakfast inns.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 4, 1997 | SUSAN DEEMER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The grounds outside Tony Alarcon's 50-something-year-old home are smothered with lush green plants hanging from trees and creeping over large rocks lining tiny pathways. There's a graceful, though dry, cement water fountain. And a sign nailed to a post reads: "Don't Feed the Rattlesnakes." Inside the old wooden two-bedroom house where Alarcon has lived since 1945, the years have clearly taken their toll.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 11, 1997 | SUSAN DEEMER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Are city officials throwing $13,000 down the toilet? Well, a former toilet? Archeologists don't think so. Since workers digging a hole found tiny fragments of old glass, ceramics and adobe bricks--a contemporary Budweiser bottle was the only thing still intact--the city's plans to put its new Christmas tree at the Historic Town Center Park have been stuck on hold while archeologists document the discovery.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 2, 1997 | KIMBERLY BROWER
The charm and Old West ways of San Juan Capistrano might not seem extreme at first glance. But the city, with claims to the Mission San Juan Capistrano and the state's oldest neighborhood, is one of a kind. The famous mission is the focal point of town activities. Founded Nov. 1, 1776, by Father Junipero Serra, the mission was built with the help of the Juaneno Mission Indians.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 20, 1990 | JAMES M. GOMEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
While a group of Indians protested what they consider their diminishing role at the Spanish mission here, nearly 8,000 people Monday crowded the bucolic gardens and courtyards of the 214-year-old landmark for the yearly return of the swallows. Officially, the return of the swallows to their spring nesting grounds was declared at about 8 a.m. with the traditional ringing of the mission bells by Paul Arbiso, the 94-year-old patriarch of this historic South County town.
NEWS
April 2, 1997 | KIMBERLY BROWER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Up a short winding road, tucked behind a refuge of trees, the Old Mission Cemetery suffered from upkeep--wildflowers and grasses had grown unchecked after the recent rains. But this week, the cemetery got a spring cleaning when a group of seven boys took time from their school break to fix up the historical grounds, established around the 1850s.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 1997 | KIMBERLY BROWER
Some of the city's historical buildings were fitted Monday with bronze plaques recognizing their architectural excellence and contribution to the community's cultural heritage. Crews fastened inscribed plaques on 20 landmarks throughout town, among them the Combs House and Montanez Adobe in the Los Rios Historic District and Mission San Juan Capistrano and the Depot downtown. "It's really exciting," Mechelle Lawrence, economic development administrator for the city, said of the project.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 28, 1997 | EMILY OTANI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bees are nesting in the chimney and plywood covers the shattered glass windows on the towering Victorian. Nearby, knee-high weeds are poised to swallow up a dusty, rust-colored shed whose warped floorboards are off-limits to visitors. Allan and Claudia Niccola look at it all and sigh, picturing the day when the dilapidated buildings are transformed into their new home and a cottage teahouse in the Los Rios Historic District.
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