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San Juan Capistrano Ca Landmarks

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 15, 1997 | KIMBERLY BROWER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
After nearly 200 years of destruction and decay, the Great Stone Church at Mission San Juan Capistrano is finally getting a face-lift. Construction crews Tuesday poured concrete beams into the east wall of the crumbling church, signaling a major step forward in the mission's $7-million project to preserve and retrofit the stone structure. "This is a real landmark event for us," mission administrator Jerry Miller said. "This is not just a pile of rubble. . . . It deserves to be saved."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 7, 1997 | DAVID REYES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Joan Irvine Smith, one of Orange County's biggest benefactors, has donated $150,000 to help preservation efforts at Mission San Juan Capistrano's Great Stone Church, it was announced Monday. Mission officials said they were grateful for the gift, which came from the Joan Irvine Smith & Athalie R. Clarke Foundation, and added that they hoped it would motivate other private and corporate sources to contribute.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 8, 1996 | JULIE FATE SULLIVAN
Plans to turn the city's 72-year-old Swanner House into a nature studies center have been delayed. The South Coast Audubon Society wants to use the city-owned historical house as a headquarters for bird-watching, monthly slide shows and historical tours of the nearby 30-acre Swanner Ranch. But instead of proceeding with negotiations with the nature group, the City Council this week decided to let other groups have a say in how the house should be used.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 17, 1996 | JULIE FATE SULLIVAN
Descendants of the original Juaneno inhabitants of the 202-year-old Blas Aguilar Adobe are finally seeing a dream turn into reality. The newly formed Blas Aguilar Foundation, which includes descendants of the Aguilar family who once owned the adobe, has been chosen by the city as the official curator of the historic structure. The foundation's goal is to turn the city-owned adobe into a museum that will house artifacts reflecting the different periods of the city's centuries-old history.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 11, 1996 | JULIE FATE SULLIVAN
It once served as home to the Juaneno Indians who built the Mission San Juan Capistrano. Later, it would become the focus of a battle between preservationists and developers. Today, the two acres of city-owned property straddling El Camino Real are known as the Historic Town Park, an unobtrusive and tranquil spread of grass lined with willowy pepper trees and palms in the middle of town.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 17, 1996 | JULIE FATE SULLIVAN
To many residents, the 202-year-old Blas Aguilar Adobe is simply a relic of the past, a dusty symbol of the early days of the Mission San Juan Capistrano. But to the Belardes family, the home is much more than that. Here is where their Juaneno Indian ancestors lived and worked, loved and died. They share a deep kinship with the little adobe. It is where they came from.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 3, 1996 | From Associated Press
Joseph Waldholtz, estranged husband of Rep. Enid Greene (R-Utah), was charged with bank fraud Thursday in what prosecutors called a check-kiting scheme involving almost $3 million. The 27-count indictment accused Waldholtz, former campaign manager for his wife, of writing numerous worthless checks in early 1995 to make it appear there were substantial deposits into two checking accounts belonging to the couple.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 27, 1996 | JULIE FATE SULLIVAN
In 1946, three young couples arrived in what was then a farming town with a vision to open the only all-night cafe between Los Angeles and San Diego. The six friends scraped together just enough cash to open a cafe and gas station in a walnut grove on old Highway 101. They named it the Walnut Grove Restaurant, one of three eateries in a town of 600. "We all pulled 12-hour shifts," said 79-year-old Lorraine Newhart Buswell, one of the founders.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 14, 1996 | JULIE FATE SULLIVAN
While most people come to the city to visit the 219-year-old Mission San Juan Capistrano--known as the Jewel of the Missions--many tend to overlook the city's other historic gems: its adobe houses. But two residents want to change that. Starting March 23, one of the city's oldest structures, the 202-year-old Montanez Adobe, will be permanently open to the public under a plan submitted to the city by resident Rita Tanner-Propersi and local artist David Whittington.
NEWS
February 25, 1996 | JULIE FATE SULLIVAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It has survived nearly 200 years of rain, swallows nests and even pillagers. Until now, there have been no serious attempts to repair it. But finally, the weather-beaten ruins of the Great Stone Church at Mission San Juan Capistrano are getting some attention.
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