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San Juan Capistrano Ca Laws

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 26, 1998 | DANIEL YI and LINN GROVES, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
To the dismay of developers, an Orange County judge Wednesday upheld San Juan Capistrano's temporary ban on large business and home projects. The moratorium, which the City Council passed in June and extended in July, prohibits major commercial construction or subdivisions of more than 50 houses until June. City officials said the law was needed for orderly development while they update San Juan Capistrano's 24-year-old General Plan.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 26, 1998 | DANIEL YI and LINN GROVES, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
To the dismay of developers, an Orange County judge Wednesday upheld San Juan Capistrano's temporary ban on large business and home projects. The moratorium, which the City Council passed in June and extended in July, prohibits major commercial construction or subdivisions of more than 50 houses until June. City officials said the law was needed for orderly development while they update San Juan Capistrano's 24-year-old General Plan.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 1, 1992 | LEN HALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sacred is a word reserved in this historic city for more than just the 216-year-old Mission San Juan Capistrano. There is also the venerable Swallows Inn and the entire downtown, the Michael Graves-designed library, the Los Rios neighborhood, the city's two ancient cemeteries--and the ridgelines. Here in the Capistrano Valley, the backbone of the hills that encircle the community are considered sacrosanct and, by city law, are off-limits to development.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 1, 1992 | LEN HALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sacred is a word reserved in this historic city for more than just the 216-year-old Mission San Juan Capistrano. There is also the venerable Swallows Inn and the entire downtown, the Michael Graves-designed library, the Los Rios neighborhood, the city's two ancient cemeteries--and the ridgelines. Here in the Capistrano Valley, the backbone of the hills that encircle the community are considered sacrosanct and, by city law, are off-limits to development.
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