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San Juan Capistrano Ca Public Lands

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 4, 1995 | JEFF BEAN
The City Council tonight will discuss the viability of selling some city-owned property. Since the early 1980s, the city has spent several million dollars on land and buildings, some of which are designated as historic structures. Cassandra Walker, the city's community development administrator, said at least three of the properties on a list of two dozen are being recommended for sale, including the downtown train depot. The city bought the depot in 1987 for $1.1 million.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 1998 | DAVID REYES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They descended on City Hall in Suburbans, pickups and any other rig that could tow a horse trailer. They told officials that their horses, more than 250 of them, could be out in the cold by June 30 unless the city stepped in. Perhaps in an urban setting, their pleas would have fallen on deaf ears. But not in this city, where the mayor runs a farm and City Council members like Wyatt Hart wax nostalgic about "the cowboy way."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 1991 | LEN HALL
Longtime farmer Shigeru Kinoshita got a check for $1 million and the city got a 56.5-acre farm last week, completing a $9.5-million land deal and open-space agreement announced last October. Under the terms of the deal, Kinoshita received the $1-million check from the city's Community Redevelopment Agency. The check represents the first payment and will be followed by 20 years of interest-only, tax-exempt payments, with the balance due in 2011, according to a report released by the city.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 4, 1996 | JULIE FATE SULLIVAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In April 1990, the people of San Juan Capistrano did something unprecedented in their 221-year history: They voted by a 71% majority to tax themselves to buy farmland to preserve the area's rustic charm. "It was an incredible accomplishment," said Gary L. Hausdorfer, a former longtime council member who as mayor introduced the idea of a bond measure to residents in 1989. "This was the first and only time in the history of the city that people endorsed taxing themselves."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 21, 1991 | LEN HALL
Acting to save historic farmland from development, the city of San Juan Capistrano has paid $6.95 million for 42.3 acres of abandoned citrus groves near the city's northwestern border. The announcement, which was made late Tuesday, caps nearly eight months of negotiations with the landowners, members of the Swanner family, who have held the land since the early 1900s. The property includes a historic farmhouse and a Christmas tree farm.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 1, 1991 | LEN HALL
There has been a delay in the city's much-heralded $9.5-million purchase of a 56-acre farm to be preserved as a living museum, city officials said. While those involved in the purchase of the Kinoshita Farm remain confident the sale will be consummated, escrow will not close today as previously announced, City Manager Stephen B. Julian said. "It is not a major problem, just a matter of some tax issues and a timetable," Julian said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 1998 | DAVID REYES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They descended on City Hall in Suburbans, pickups and any other rig that could tow a horse trailer. They told officials that their horses, more than 250 of them, could be out in the cold by June 30 unless the city stepped in. Perhaps in an urban setting, their pleas would have fallen on deaf ears. But not in this city, where the mayor runs a farm and City Council members like Wyatt Hart wax nostalgic about "the cowboy way."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 22, 1989 | LUCILLE RENWICK, Times Staff Writer
The San Juan Capistrano City Council on Tuesday night took a first step toward buying 200 acres of farmland to prevent its development. The council agreed to a proposal by Mayor Gary Hausdorfer that the city hire consultants to study the idea of selling a municipal bond to raise money for the land. That bond, if approved by voters, would act as a savings account, giving the city funds to buy land from farmers in the open market.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 4, 1996 | JULIE FATE SULLIVAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In April 1990, the people of San Juan Capistrano did something unprecedented in their 221-year history: They voted by a 71% majority to tax themselves to buy farmland to preserve the area's rustic charm. "It was an incredible accomplishment," said Gary L. Hausdorfer, a former longtime council member who as mayor introduced the idea of a bond measure to residents in 1989. "This was the first and only time in the history of the city that people endorsed taxing themselves."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 31, 1990 | LEN HALL
A 56-acre farm, smack in the middle of a densely populated residential area, was bought by the city Tuesday for $9.5 million to be preserved as a sort of living museum. In an unprecedented arrangement, the City Council voted to buy the Kinoshita farm and to go into the farming business in an attempt to preserve part of the Capistrano Valley's quickly disappearing heritage.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 4, 1995 | JEFF BEAN
The City Council tonight will discuss the viability of selling some city-owned property. Since the early 1980s, the city has spent several million dollars on land and buildings, some of which are designated as historic structures. Cassandra Walker, the city's community development administrator, said at least three of the properties on a list of two dozen are being recommended for sale, including the downtown train depot. The city bought the depot in 1987 for $1.1 million.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 21, 1991 | LEN HALL
Acting to save historic farmland from development, the city of San Juan Capistrano has paid $6.95 million for 42.3 acres of abandoned citrus groves near the city's northwestern border. The announcement, which was made late Tuesday, caps nearly eight months of negotiations with the landowners, members of the Swanner family, who have held the land since the early 1900s. The property includes a historic farmhouse and a Christmas tree farm.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 1991 | LEN HALL
Longtime farmer Shigeru Kinoshita got a check for $1 million and the city got a 56.5-acre farm last week, completing a $9.5-million land deal and open-space agreement announced last October. Under the terms of the deal, Kinoshita received the $1-million check from the city's Community Redevelopment Agency. The check represents the first payment and will be followed by 20 years of interest-only, tax-exempt payments, with the balance due in 2011, according to a report released by the city.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 1, 1991 | LEN HALL
There has been a delay in the city's much-heralded $9.5-million purchase of a 56-acre farm to be preserved as a living museum, city officials said. While those involved in the purchase of the Kinoshita Farm remain confident the sale will be consummated, escrow will not close today as previously announced, City Manager Stephen B. Julian said. "It is not a major problem, just a matter of some tax issues and a timetable," Julian said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 31, 1990 | LEN HALL
A 56-acre farm, smack in the middle of a densely populated residential area, was bought by the city Tuesday for $9.5 million to be preserved as a sort of living museum. In an unprecedented arrangement, the City Council voted to buy the Kinoshita farm and to go into the farming business in an attempt to preserve part of the Capistrano Valley's quickly disappearing heritage.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 22, 1989 | LUCILLE RENWICK, Times Staff Writer
The San Juan Capistrano City Council on Tuesday night took a first step toward buying 200 acres of farmland to prevent its development. The council agreed to a proposal by Mayor Gary Hausdorfer that the city hire consultants to study the idea of selling a municipal bond to raise money for the land. That bond, if approved by voters, would act as a savings account, giving the city funds to buy land from farmers in the open market.
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