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San Juan Capistrano Ca Taxes

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 6, 1999 | ROBERT OURLIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
San Juan Capistrano officials postponed a public hearing Tuesday on a plan that would bill new-home owners for hillside stabilization if their houses are damaged by landslides. The City Council is debating whether to create a so-called Geologic Hazard Abatement District at the 350-home Pacific Point subdivision in the southern part of the city. Council members voted to delay action until geological reports are completed on the hilly site.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 26, 1999 | Chris Ceballos, (949) 248-2150
The City Council recently approved property tax assessments for six landscape maintenance districts in the city. Homeowners in the Seaview district will pay $557; in the Belford Terrace district, $360; in the Mission Springs district, $290; in the Mission Woods district, $200; in the Los Corrales district, $80; and in the Capistrano Royale district, $1,100. The assessments pay for weekly landscape maintenance including mowing, weeding, fertilization, de-thatching and minor tree trimming.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 3, 1992 | LEN HALL
Hours before the Wednesday deadline, the City Council adopted a $10.9-million budget for the 1992-93 fiscal year that includes several tax increases and the layoff of one city employee. Tuesday's unanimous vote allowed the city to start the fiscal year with a budget intact, although council members expressed fears about having to take additional action if state revenue cuts are made later this summer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 6, 1999 | ROBERT OURLIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
San Juan Capistrano officials postponed a public hearing Tuesday on a plan that would bill new-home owners for hillside stabilization if their houses are damaged by landslides. The City Council is debating whether to create a so-called Geologic Hazard Abatement District at the 350-home Pacific Point subdivision in the southern part of the city. Council members voted to delay action until geological reports are completed on the hilly site.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 26, 1999 | Chris Ceballos, (949) 248-2150
The City Council recently approved property tax assessments for six landscape maintenance districts in the city. Homeowners in the Seaview district will pay $557; in the Belford Terrace district, $360; in the Mission Springs district, $290; in the Mission Woods district, $200; in the Los Corrales district, $80; and in the Capistrano Royale district, $1,100. The assessments pay for weekly landscape maintenance including mowing, weeding, fertilization, de-thatching and minor tree trimming.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 24, 1994 | JEFF BEAN
Stuart Baron owes nearly $200 to a local trash hauler for unpaid charges he doesn't plan on paying. The bachelor said he only generates one grocery bag of rubbish per month, disposes of it at the business where he works in Irvine, and recycles all his paper, cans and bottles. Baron contends that a mandatory fee charged by the city's hauler, Solag Disposal Inc., is a tax because he doesn't receive a service in return. "You can't have a mandatory fee," Baron said. "It's an oxymoron."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 4, 1996 | JULIE FATE SULLIVAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In April 1990, the people of San Juan Capistrano did something unprecedented in their 221-year history: They voted by a 71% majority to tax themselves to buy farmland to preserve the area's rustic charm. "It was an incredible accomplishment," said Gary L. Hausdorfer, a former longtime council member who as mayor introduced the idea of a bond measure to residents in 1989. "This was the first and only time in the history of the city that people endorsed taxing themselves."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 2, 1998 | ROBERT OURLIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
San Juan Capistrano is considering a plan that would bill new-home owners for hillside stabilization if their houses are damaged by landslides--a proposal that has some longtime residents crying foul. Developer SunCal Cos. of Anaheim, which is building the 350-unit Pacific Point project, is proposing an assessment district that would let the city issue bonds if it needed money to repair slopes. The bonds would be paid off by a tax on the district's homeowners.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 2, 1998 | ROBERT OURLIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
San Juan Capistrano is considering a plan that would bill new-home owners for hillside stabilization if their houses are damaged by landslides--a proposal that has some longtime residents crying foul. Developer SunCal Cos. of Anaheim, which is building the 350-unit Pacific Point project, is proposing an assessment district that would let the city issue bonds if it needed money to repair slopes. The bonds would be paid off by a tax on the district's homeowners.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 4, 1996 | JULIE FATE SULLIVAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In April 1990, the people of San Juan Capistrano did something unprecedented in their 221-year history: They voted by a 71% majority to tax themselves to buy farmland to preserve the area's rustic charm. "It was an incredible accomplishment," said Gary L. Hausdorfer, a former longtime council member who as mayor introduced the idea of a bond measure to residents in 1989. "This was the first and only time in the history of the city that people endorsed taxing themselves."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 24, 1994 | JEFF BEAN
Stuart Baron owes nearly $200 to a local trash hauler for unpaid charges he doesn't plan on paying. The bachelor said he only generates one grocery bag of rubbish per month, disposes of it at the business where he works in Irvine, and recycles all his paper, cans and bottles. Baron contends that a mandatory fee charged by the city's hauler, Solag Disposal Inc., is a tax because he doesn't receive a service in return. "You can't have a mandatory fee," Baron said. "It's an oxymoron."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 3, 1992 | LEN HALL
Hours before the Wednesday deadline, the City Council adopted a $10.9-million budget for the 1992-93 fiscal year that includes several tax increases and the layoff of one city employee. Tuesday's unanimous vote allowed the city to start the fiscal year with a budget intact, although council members expressed fears about having to take additional action if state revenue cuts are made later this summer.
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