Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSan Juan Capistrano Landmarks
IN THE NEWS

San Juan Capistrano Landmarks

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 5, 1997 | STEVE CARNEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Tall and stately, with faded colors and logos of yesteryear, the vintage gasoline pumps loaded onto a truck here this week have long since gone dry. The man who collected them for 25 years says he's also on empty. David Chorak has been forced to sell his beloved collection of automotive memorabilia for a little more than half its $60,000 value to pay for his legal defense in, at least as he sees it, a fight to preserve his historic neighborhood.
ARTICLES BY DATE
TRAVEL
September 12, 2004 | David Haldane, Times Staff Writer
It was inside Serra Chapel that my epiphany began. It's an eerie place of beauty with history painted on its walls, a tiny room with a view of another age. In my life as a Californian, I have spent hours meditating in this birth chamber of the state.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 14, 1996 | JULIE FATE SULLIVAN
Visitors who wander into the sleepy, Los Rios neighborhood seeking centuries-old adobes and rustic farm animals may soon be enjoying Chardonnay beneath the mulberry trees. Last week, the City Council voted to amend the 20-year-old Los Rios precise plan--the law that governs the historic neighborhood--to allow the owners of the Ramos House Cafe to serve wine and beer with their lunch menu, a first for the area. Since the 1970s, the neighborhood has been off-limits to the sale of alcohol.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 27, 2003 | Dave McKibben, Times Staff Writer
Faced with the daunting task of attracting a younger generation to Mission San Juan Capistrano, new executive director Mechelle Lawrence turned to her most trusted advisor. She sent her 11-year-old son, Dylan, on a field trip around the 227-year-old mission. He and a of couple buddies strolled the grounds, giving her an honest assessment via walkie-talkie. "He told me to beef up the olive press, that it was really boring," Lawrence said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 8, 1994 | JEFF BEAN
The City Council has approved the first phase of a downtown sign program designed to show visitors how to find local historic landmarks other than Mission San Juan Capistrano. The program also includes 10,000 brochures for walking tours of downtown. The council last week approved the program and budgeted $12,400 for the first phase. City staff has proposed that signs be set up at key spots to alert tourists and other visitors to particular buildings of note and to the Los Rios Historic District.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 3, 1999 | NANCY HILL-HOLTZMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Great Stone Church at Mission San Juan Capistrano on Monday received a $1-million state grant, a significant step toward refurbishment. Another $5.4 million is needed to complete the church and vestry. But Monday's grant--the first time government funds have gone toward preserving the church--allows the preservation project to gear up again after being stalled since January for lack of funds.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 16, 1997 | JESS BRAVIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Time seems to stand still in the serene courtyards of Mission San Juan Capistrano, founded centuries before the human spirit was bedeviled by such inventions as the Internet and Abstract Expressionism. Truth is, the mission does now have a Web site. Still, when nearly 100 artists gathered here throughout the week to lay paint to canvas for $10,000 in prizes that will be awarded today, Cubism, Surrealism and Pop Art were banished from the grounds.
NEWS
May 5, 1988 | PATRICK MOTT, Patrick Mott is a regular contributor to Orange County Life
The Mission Church, the most visible landmark in San Juan Capistrano, is not, as many have assumed, a replica of the Old Stone Church that once stood on the adjacent mission grounds. It is actually a sort of hybrid, less a clone of the Stone Church than a blood relative. When the designers of the new church sat down at their drawing boards, they had few clues as to what the original church looked like apart from the section of the sanctuary and a few ruined walls that still stand.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 28, 2000 | SCOTT SCHUDY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Engineers and preservationists have had a long-standing fear that the cracked dome of Mission San Juan Capistrano's Great Stone Church would come crashing down before they had a chance to fix it. Their anxiety eased a little last week as a construction team began pouring concrete over a network of steel rods that will wrap around and tie both halves of the sanctuary dome. "There was a sense of urgency about it, because once they crack and they fall, they're gone.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 1995 | LESLIE BERKMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For more than a century, artists searching California for romance, beauty and history have been attracted to the ghostly ruins, graceful arches, bubbling fountains and exotic gardens of Mission San Juan Capistrano. "It is the most-often-portrayed architectural structure in California and by far the most popular of the state's 21 (Franciscan) missions in art," said Jean Stern, director of the Irvine Museum.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 28, 2000 | SCOTT SCHUDY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Engineers and preservationists have had a long-standing fear that the cracked dome of Mission San Juan Capistrano's Great Stone Church would come crashing down before they had a chance to fix it. Their anxiety eased a little last week as a construction team began pouring concrete over a network of steel rods that will wrap around and tie both halves of the sanctuary dome. "There was a sense of urgency about it, because once they crack and they fall, they're gone.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 3, 1999 | NANCY HILL-HOLTZMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Great Stone Church at Mission San Juan Capistrano on Monday received a $1-million state grant, a significant step toward refurbishment. Another $5.4 million is needed to complete the church and vestry. But Monday's grant--the first time government funds have gone toward preserving the church--allows the preservation project to gear up again after being stalled since January for lack of funds.
NEWS
April 6, 1998 | ANN CONWAY
Here's a chance to make history while preserving a piece of it: Volunteer for the first California Mission Heritage Pageant, a fund-raiser for Mission San Juan Capistrano. Organizers are looking for committee chairs and sponsors to help launch the pageant, planned for August 1999. Actor Ricardo Montalban has agreed to narrate the pageant and serve as honorary chairman.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 16, 1997 | JESS BRAVIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Time seems to stand still in the serene courtyards of Mission San Juan Capistrano, founded centuries before the human spirit was bedeviled by such inventions as the Internet and Abstract Expressionism. Truth is, the mission does now have a Web site. Still, when nearly 100 artists gathered here throughout the week to lay paint to canvas for $10,000 in prizes that will be awarded today, Cubism, Surrealism and Pop Art were banished from the grounds.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 5, 1997 | STEVE CARNEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Tall and stately, with faded colors and logos of yesteryear, the vintage gasoline pumps loaded onto a truck here this week have long since gone dry. The man who collected them for 25 years says he's also on empty. David Chorak has been forced to sell his beloved collection of automotive memorabilia for a little more than half its $60,000 value to pay for his legal defense in, at least as he sees it, a fight to preserve his historic neighborhood.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 14, 1996 | JULIE FATE SULLIVAN
Visitors who wander into the sleepy, Los Rios neighborhood seeking centuries-old adobes and rustic farm animals may soon be enjoying Chardonnay beneath the mulberry trees. Last week, the City Council voted to amend the 20-year-old Los Rios precise plan--the law that governs the historic neighborhood--to allow the owners of the Ramos House Cafe to serve wine and beer with their lunch menu, a first for the area. Since the 1970s, the neighborhood has been off-limits to the sale of alcohol.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 3, 1990 | JAMES M. GOMEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
While electricians dug delicately around the artifact-rich Mission San Juan Capistrano grounds last week, preservation architect John C. Loomis studied the crumbling brick and sandstone archway that frames the mission's peaceful courtyard. "These guys are basically flapping in the breeze," Loomis said, pointing to the free-standing arches that were built in the late 1700s by local Indians and Spanish settlers. "There's nothing to hold them up."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 1995 | LESLIE BERKMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For more than a century, artists searching California for romance, beauty and history have been attracted to the ghostly ruins, graceful arches, bubbling fountains and exotic gardens of Mission San Juan Capistrano. "It is the most-often-portrayed architectural structure in California and by far the most popular of the state's 21 (Franciscan) missions in art," said Jean Stern, director of the Irvine Museum.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|