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San Juan Capistrano Research Institute

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 10, 1990
The San Juan Capistrano Research Institute now has a new home in the former Bank of America building downtown on Forster Street. This week, the City Council unanimously approved leasing the 10,000-square-foot building to the institute, which researches such issues as the thinning of the ozone layer, acid rain and carbon dioxide buildup in the atmosphere.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 3, 1996 | JULIE FATE SULLIVAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
As about 65 fifth-graders sat in rapt silence, straining on the edge of their seats to get a better look, Bruce H. Betts mixed a concoction of dry ice, water and brown sugar with a handful of dirt and a few squirts of Windex. A few minutes later, Betts, a planetary scientist from the San Juan Capistrano Research Institute, held the frozen mixture up for all to see: What looked like a dirty snowball with little jets of gas spitting forth from its surface was actually a comet in the making.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 22, 1994 | MICHAEL GRANBERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The boy in the front row held up an uglyrock, gray, jagged and dirty. "It's a meteorite!" he said. The girl in the second row wanted to know how close she could come to the sun before she and her spaceship blew apart in a ball of fire. And the girl in the back asked, with the weight of the world etched in her face, whether we will "ever be able to repair the ozone layer." Douglas B.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 22, 1994 | MICHAEL GRANBERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The boy in the front row held up an uglyrock, gray, jagged and dirty. "It's a meteorite!" he said. The girl in the second row wanted to know how close she could come to the sun before she and her spaceship blew apart in a ball of fire. And the girl in the back asked, with the weight of the world etched in her face, whether we will "ever be able to repair the ozone layer." Douglas B.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 3, 1996 | JULIE FATE SULLIVAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
As about 65 fifth-graders sat in rapt silence, straining on the edge of their seats to get a better look, Bruce H. Betts mixed a concoction of dry ice, water and brown sugar with a handful of dirt and a few squirts of Windex. A few minutes later, Betts, a planetary scientist from the San Juan Capistrano Research Institute, held the frozen mixture up for all to see: What looked like a dirty snowball with little jets of gas spitting forth from its surface was actually a comet in the making.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 6, 1999 | Jenifer Ragland, (949) 574-4207
The Mission Viejo Library on Wednesday will host a high-tech, interactive video conference about Mars. The event--which also may be viewed in Dana Point and Anaheim--will feature William Hartmann, a Mars researcher with the Planetary Research Institute in Tucson, Ariz., and Andre Bormanis, a science expert who is a consultant for several science fiction TV shows. They will present the latest data from the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft and answer questions from the public.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 17, 2000 | Matt Kieta, (949) 248-2158
The City Council will consider possible uses for the Old Fire Station Recreation Complex, which used to serve as the city's community facility. City staff is recommending leasing the facility to the San Juan Capistrano Research Institute, which wants to use the building for office space and community meetings, as well as a place for elementary schoolchildren to come for science field trips. The Capistrano Beach Cities YMCA also submitted a proposal to use the facility as a youth sports center.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 13, 1992 | BOB ELSTON
The San Juan Capistrano Research Institute this week is displaying moon rock samples collected by astronauts on the six Apollo landings during the late 1960s and early 1970s. The moon rocks are usually at the institute for research purposes, but for this week they will be on display along with a wall map of the lunar surface and photos of the Apollo missions 20 years ago.
NEWS
July 4, 1991 | LEE DYE, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
A couple of years ago, an asteroid large enough to wipe out the city of Los Angeles crossed the Earth's path close enough to get a lot of people's attention. Despite the hundreds of telescopes that are turned toward the night sky on any given evening, no one saw the asteroid until it had passed within a mere 400,000 miles. That really bothers a lot of people, including a small band of experts who have assumed the responsibility of warning the world about approaching doom.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 10, 1990
The San Juan Capistrano Research Institute now has a new home in the former Bank of America building downtown on Forster Street. This week, the City Council unanimously approved leasing the 10,000-square-foot building to the institute, which researches such issues as the thinning of the ozone layer, acid rain and carbon dioxide buildup in the atmosphere.
NEWS
November 21, 1992 | JUDY PASTERNAK, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Even the solar system is feeling the recession. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration held its first open audition this week, casting for future robotic solar system explorations--a onetime extravaganza that has been boiled down to a very low-budget project. The call is for missions that are cheap and fast, costing less than $150 million and allowing just three years from approval to launch.
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