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San Juan Hot Springs

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 25, 2005 | DAVID HALDANE, Times Staff Writer
The gurgling is the first signal that one has neared the elusive spot. Then the vibrations start, deep beneath the feet. Moments later when sulfur assaults the nostrils, you know exactly where you stand: at the ancient and storied San Juan Hot Springs.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 25, 2005 | DAVID HALDANE, Times Staff Writer
The gurgling is the first signal that one has neared the elusive spot. Then the vibrations start, deep beneath the feet. Moments later when sulfur assaults the nostrils, you know exactly where you stand: at the ancient and storied San Juan Hot Springs.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 17, 1989 | WENDY PAULSON
Despite the lack of a bronze plaque to make it official, county representatives on Monday dubbed a group of mineral springs bubbling up in an area off Ortega Highway as Orange County's 38th historical landmark. But the delivery glitch that prevented the plaque from reaching its new home--a freshly painted, white stucco pedestal--did not stop county officials from praising the event as an example of South Orange County's growing commitment to its Old West history.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 26, 1995 | LEN HALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Historic San Juan Hot Springs, the century-old Ortega Highway spa that has been boarded up since 1992, may see new life thanks to an Asian resort operator. * Korea-based Hangshin Ltd. has proposed a new resort for the 17-acre oasis that has been a Southern California institution since the 1880s. The proposal calls for Hangshin Ltd., working with Amtech Sports Inc.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 26, 1995 | LEN HALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Historic San Juan Hot Springs, the century-old Ortega Highway spa that has been boarded up since 1992, may see new life thanks to an Asian resort operator. * Korea-based Hangshin Ltd. has proposed a new resort for the 17-acre oasis that has been a Southern California institution since the 1880s. The proposal calls for Hangshin Ltd., working with Amtech Sports Inc.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 14, 1989
The San Juan Hot Springs will be dedicated as Orange County's 38th historical landmark in a noon ceremony scheduled Monday - at the hot-tub haven, 12 miles east of San Juan Capistrano on Ortega Highway. Nestled in the mountains abutting Cleveland National Forest, the hot springs were first documented by Spanish missionaries who visited the Mission San Juan Capistrano in the late 1700s. Local Indians believed the bubbling, 100-degree mineral water had spiritual healing power.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 10, 1992 | LEN HALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Soothing, 120-degree mineral water still gushes from the ground at 50 gallons a minute, but the once plentiful bathers, revelers and therapy seekers are nowhere to be seen. For the first summer in 12 years, the historic San Juan Hot Springs spa sits boarded up and off-limits to the public.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 13, 1990 | JIM CARLTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For generations, visitors have journeyed to San Juan Hot Springs to luxuriate in the 120-degree natural baths on a cool summer night. From the late 1800s until the 1930s, the springs flourished as a resort, providing boardinghouse accommodations for $3 a week and hot baths for 35 cents. A dance hall adorned the site, and visitors came from far and near in response to ads that touted the hot springs as a "fountain of youth."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 22, 1992 | LEN HALL and MARK I. PINSKY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
San Juan Hot Springs, a Southern California institution whose baths have lured thousands since the 1800s, was padlocked and closed indefinitely Friday by county officials. The county's action came at the reluctant request of the spa's operator, Russ Kiessig of San Juan Capistrano, who said the 17-acre resort, where 120-degree water gushes at 50 gallons a minute, was no longer profitable. "I feel terrible," Kiessig said. "I feel like that wonderful area needs and should have a world-class spa."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 10, 1992 | LEN HALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Soothing, 120-degree mineral water still gushes from the ground at 50 gallons a minute, but the once plentiful bathers, revelers and therapy seekers are nowhere to be seen. For the first summer in 12 years, the historic San Juan Hot Springs spa sits boarded up and off-limits to the public.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 22, 1992 | LEN HALL and MARK I. PINSKY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
San Juan Hot Springs, a Southern California institution whose baths have lured thousands since the 1800s, was padlocked and closed indefinitely Friday by county officials. The county's action came at the reluctant request of the spa's operator, Russ Kiessig of San Juan Capistrano, who said the 17-acre resort, where 120-degree water gushes at 50 gallons a minute, was no longer profitable. "I feel terrible," Kiessig said. "I feel like that wonderful area needs and should have a world-class spa."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 13, 1990 | JIM CARLTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For generations, visitors have journeyed to San Juan Hot Springs to luxuriate in the 120-degree natural baths on a cool summer night. From the late 1800s until the 1930s, the springs flourished as a resort, providing boardinghouse accommodations for $3 a week and hot baths for 35 cents. A dance hall adorned the site, and visitors came from far and near in response to ads that touted the hot springs as a "fountain of youth."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 17, 1989 | WENDY PAULSON
Despite the lack of a bronze plaque to make it official, county representatives on Monday dubbed a group of mineral springs bubbling up in an area off Ortega Highway as Orange County's 38th historical landmark. But the delivery glitch that prevented the plaque from reaching its new home--a freshly painted, white stucco pedestal--did not stop county officials from praising the event as an example of South Orange County's growing commitment to its Old West history.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 14, 1989
The San Juan Hot Springs will be dedicated as Orange County's 38th historical landmark in a noon ceremony scheduled Monday - at the hot-tub haven, 12 miles east of San Juan Capistrano on Ortega Highway. Nestled in the mountains abutting Cleveland National Forest, the hot springs were first documented by Spanish missionaries who visited the Mission San Juan Capistrano in the late 1700s. Local Indians believed the bubbling, 100-degree mineral water had spiritual healing power.
NEWS
May 22, 1988 | SHERRY ANGEL, Angel is assistant editor of Celebrate! and a native of Orange County
1880s THE GASOLINE auto and modern bicycle are invented, but Orange County residents are more enamored of nature than machines. Quail and rabbit hunting in the Laguna hills are popular pastimes, and ostrich farming is big in north Orange County. An ostrich-plume hat is a must for fashionable ladies. THE BIG CRIME chases are on horseback, often led by the Anti-Horse Thief Society. THE PLACENTIA Grass Eaters, also known as Societas Fraternia, lead a controversial communal life on a diet of uncooked fruits and vegetables.
NEWS
November 26, 1987 | PATRICK MOTT, For The Times and
What's the price for an hour in heaven? In Orange County, it's $7.50. After 6 p.m., it goes up a dollar. Paradise goes for the same price. So does Nirvana. Valhalla goes for a dollar more, though, because it has a better view.
NEWS
May 22, 1988 | SHERRY ANGEL, Angel is assistant editor of Celebrate! and a native of Orange County
1880s THE GASOLINE auto and modern bicycle are invented, but Orange County residents are more enamored of nature than machines. Quail and rabbit hunting in the Laguna hills are popular pastimes, and ostrich farming is big in north Orange County. An ostrich-plume hat is a must for fashionable ladies. THE BIG CRIME chases are on horseback, often led by the Anti-Horse Thief Society. THE PLACENTIA Grass Eaters, also known as Societas Fraternia, lead a controversial communal life on a diet of uncooked fruits and vegetables.
NEWS
November 26, 1987 | PATRICK MOTT, For The Times and
What's the price for an hour in heaven? In Orange County, it's $7.50. After 6 p.m., it goes up a dollar. Paradise goes for the same price. So does Nirvana. Valhalla goes for a dollar more, though, because it has a better view.
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