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San Juan Trail

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TRAVEL
August 7, 1988 | ROBERT SMITH, Smith is a Long Beach free-lance writer. and
Give me an exciting ride, long or short, a chance to see wildlife in their natural habitat, a scenic location and, following a ride, a place to soak in . . . and I'm hooked. I found such an experience on the San Juan Trail off the Ortega Highway in Cleveland National Forest about 25 miles from San Juan Capistrano. The trail is 11.2 miles long, with a 2,600-foot descent that ends a short distance from San Juan Capistrano Hot Springs, home of hot (about 100 degrees), soothing mineral water.
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NEWS
September 23, 2003 | Steve Casimiro, Special to The Times
I always finish riding San Juan Trail with a buzz of happiness and a sense of relief. It's the best mountain bike trail in Orange County, and one of the most dangerous. My good friend Joe was life-flighted from the trail after a bad crash and now has a titanium plate in his face. I once went flying into the chaparral and had to extract a pinkie-size wood chunk from deep within my calf.
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SPORTS
November 29, 1998 | LINDA WHITMORE
As if running 50 miles isn't daunting enough, try starting the race in darkness, when runners use flashlights to illuminate the trail, which is overgrown with chaparral and brambles. That's what the field of 39 runners faced in October at the San Juan Trail 50-Mile Race. "The conditions for that race are considered pretty tough," said Scott McKenzie, who finished the race first, in 8 hours 3 minutes. "There's a lot of ascending and descending, somewhere between 8,000 and 9,000 feet.
SPORTS
October 28, 1999 | MARTIN BECK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Baz Hawley, the Pied Piper of Orange County ultradistance trail running, knows how difficult it is to get runners to go long. "It's very hard to persuade even a marathon runner to run 50 miles; it goes over their heads," Hawley said. "But now slowly but surely people are enjoying not so much racing trails but just running in the woods." About 100 hardy souls will be doing just that Saturday at Hawley's Saddleback Mountain Marathon. The 26.2-mile race starts at 8 a.m.
NEWS
August 26, 1992 | BRAD BONHALL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The San Juan Trail is a living timeline of Orange County history. Parts of the trail trace a path that for hundreds of years served the peaceable Juaneno Indians as a route from the coastal valley over the Santa Ana Mountains. Now, as many as 50 hard-core mountain bikers each weekend form a continuous and lively parade up and down the Forest Service trail. Because of its length and variety of terrain, the 11.
NEWS
May 28, 1999 | BRAD BONHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For thousands of years it was a dead-quiet Juaneno Indian path. Now, on many weekends, as many as 200 outdoors enthusiasts raise dust and often a little hell on San Juan Trail, one of Southern California's most popular and challenging mountain bike tracks. Spanning 11.9 east-west miles in the Santa Ana Mountains, the trail is loved for its scenery and accessibility. It can be ridden in January drizzle and August heat, by weekend warriors and pros, at leisurely or breakneck speeds.
SPORTS
July 23, 1988
I've run weekly over the San Juan Trail off of Ortega Highway in southern Orange County. Mountain bikes have ravaged these trails far beyond nature's wildest efforts. Don Douglass speaks of tires passing over the terrain with less impact than a hiking boot or a horse's hoof. What he doesn't mention is that tires do not roll over turns and switch-backs, they dig into and groove the trails. Not only is the trail left with permanent scars, but add a rainstorm or two and the groove becomes a 6- to 8-inch trench and the rest of the trail begins to wash down the mountain.
SPORTS
October 28, 1999 | MARTIN BECK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Baz Hawley, the Pied Piper of Orange County ultradistance trail running, knows how difficult it is to get runners to go long. "It's very hard to persuade even a marathon runner to run 50 miles; it goes over their heads," Hawley said. "But now slowly but surely people are enjoying not so much racing trails but just running in the woods." About 100 hardy souls will be doing just that Saturday at Hawley's Saddleback Mountain Marathon. The 26.2-mile race starts at 8 a.m.
NEWS
September 23, 2003 | Steve Casimiro, Special to The Times
I always finish riding San Juan Trail with a buzz of happiness and a sense of relief. It's the best mountain bike trail in Orange County, and one of the most dangerous. My good friend Joe was life-flighted from the trail after a bad crash and now has a titanium plate in his face. I once went flying into the chaparral and had to extract a pinkie-size wood chunk from deep within my calf.
NEWS
June 9, 1994 | BENJAMIN EPSTEIN, Benjamin Epstein is a free-lance writer who contributes regularly to The Times Orange County Edition
The two-mile San Juan Loop Trail begins and ends mere feet from the Ortega Highway, and there's no better introduction to hiking in the Santa Ana Mountains' Ortega Corridor. 1:30 to 2: The sign out front promises "candy, fudge, chocolate, cold drinks, ice cream," so it's no surprise that the Ortega Oaks General Store is also called the Olde Candy Shop. "It's been known as the candy store for 30 years," said owner James Foster, "just because of the candy.
NEWS
May 28, 1999 | BRAD BONHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For thousands of years it was a dead-quiet Juaneno Indian path. Now, on many weekends, as many as 200 outdoors enthusiasts raise dust and often a little hell on San Juan Trail, one of Southern California's most popular and challenging mountain bike tracks. Spanning 11.9 east-west miles in the Santa Ana Mountains, the trail is loved for its scenery and accessibility. It can be ridden in January drizzle and August heat, by weekend warriors and pros, at leisurely or breakneck speeds.
SPORTS
November 29, 1998 | LINDA WHITMORE
As if running 50 miles isn't daunting enough, try starting the race in darkness, when runners use flashlights to illuminate the trail, which is overgrown with chaparral and brambles. That's what the field of 39 runners faced in October at the San Juan Trail 50-Mile Race. "The conditions for that race are considered pretty tough," said Scott McKenzie, who finished the race first, in 8 hours 3 minutes. "There's a lot of ascending and descending, somewhere between 8,000 and 9,000 feet.
NEWS
June 9, 1994 | BENJAMIN EPSTEIN, Benjamin Epstein is a free-lance writer who contributes regularly to The Times Orange County Edition
The two-mile San Juan Loop Trail begins and ends mere feet from the Ortega Highway, and there's no better introduction to hiking in the Santa Ana Mountains' Ortega Corridor. 1:30 to 2: The sign out front promises "candy, fudge, chocolate, cold drinks, ice cream," so it's no surprise that the Ortega Oaks General Store is also called the Olde Candy Shop. "It's been known as the candy store for 30 years," said owner James Foster, "just because of the candy.
NEWS
August 26, 1992 | BRAD BONHALL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The San Juan Trail is a living timeline of Orange County history. Parts of the trail trace a path that for hundreds of years served the peaceable Juaneno Indians as a route from the coastal valley over the Santa Ana Mountains. Now, as many as 50 hard-core mountain bikers each weekend form a continuous and lively parade up and down the Forest Service trail. Because of its length and variety of terrain, the 11.
TRAVEL
August 7, 1988 | ROBERT SMITH, Smith is a Long Beach free-lance writer. and
Give me an exciting ride, long or short, a chance to see wildlife in their natural habitat, a scenic location and, following a ride, a place to soak in . . . and I'm hooked. I found such an experience on the San Juan Trail off the Ortega Highway in Cleveland National Forest about 25 miles from San Juan Capistrano. The trail is 11.2 miles long, with a 2,600-foot descent that ends a short distance from San Juan Capistrano Hot Springs, home of hot (about 100 degrees), soothing mineral water.
SPORTS
July 23, 1988
I've run weekly over the San Juan Trail off of Ortega Highway in southern Orange County. Mountain bikes have ravaged these trails far beyond nature's wildest efforts. Don Douglass speaks of tires passing over the terrain with less impact than a hiking boot or a horse's hoof. What he doesn't mention is that tires do not roll over turns and switch-backs, they dig into and groove the trails. Not only is the trail left with permanent scars, but add a rainstorm or two and the groove becomes a 6- to 8-inch trench and the rest of the trail begins to wash down the mountain.
NEWS
September 24, 1992
As a regular hiker in the hills and parks of Orange County, I am well acquainted with the potential difficulties of sharing hiking trails with mountain bikers. Thus it was with alarm that I read your article on the San Juan Trail ("An Uphill Battle," Aug. 26). I feel that articles like this will only serve to increase the use of a trail that was not made for bicycles. The San Juan Trail was built for hikers (including the Juaneno Indians). Heavy bike traffic will inevitably destroy the footpath and result in a widened and rutted trail.
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