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San Luis Obispo Ca Development And Redevelopment

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NEWS
June 5, 1997 | FRANK CLIFFORD, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
For almost a century, the salt-sprayed headlands of the bucolic Central Coast north of Cambria have escaped the tide of development that has washed over much of the state's Pacific shores. The era of rural tranquillity may have come to an official end this week, however, with a sweeping decision by the San Luis Obispo County Board of Supervisors to relax growth controls, paving the way for commercial and residential construction on 2,000 acres of coastal hills and meadows.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 1, 1998 | FRANK CLIFFORD, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
Setting the stage for a political battle royal over the future of one of California's most breathtaking coastal landscapes, the staff of the state's Coastal Commission on Wednesday recommended denial of the Hearst Corp.'s proposal to build a sprawling resort complex on the headlands north of San Simeon. With the blessing of the San Luis Obispo County Board of Supervisors, the Hearst Corp.
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NEWS
July 27, 1997 | STEPHANIE SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The bumper sticker says it all: Even Cowboys Love Mozart. In other words, Symphony No. 27 can go up against the Coors Light Destruction Derby and, if not win, at least draw a credible crowd. And so it is that this tucked-away town--where the university specializes in dairy science and cows mosey along the freeway--has for 27 years hosted an annual Mozart festival.
NEWS
July 27, 1997 | STEPHANIE SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The bumper sticker says it all: Even Cowboys Love Mozart. In other words, Symphony No. 27 can go up against the Coors Light Destruction Derby and, if not win, at least draw a credible crowd. And so it is that this tucked-away town--where the university specializes in dairy science and cows mosey along the freeway--has for 27 years hosted an annual Mozart festival.
NEWS
April 25, 1994 | MARIA L. La GANGA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There are streets here where the porches are deep, the shade is cool and the spring flowers billow thick as clouds, where old men doze over the Sunday paper and children build castles out of sheets and sagging wicker lounges. And then there are the suburbs of the last 10 years, largely populated by fleeing Angelenos, where certain houses have "a double garage door and a blank wall (as) the only presentation to the street," says Glen Matteson, associate city planner.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 1, 1998 | FRANK CLIFFORD, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
Setting the stage for a political battle royal over the future of one of California's most breathtaking coastal landscapes, the staff of the state's Coastal Commission on Wednesday recommended denial of the Hearst Corp.'s proposal to build a sprawling resort complex on the headlands north of San Simeon. With the blessing of the San Luis Obispo County Board of Supervisors, the Hearst Corp.
NEWS
June 5, 1997 | FRANK CLIFFORD, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
For almost a century, the salt-sprayed headlands of the bucolic Central Coast north of Cambria have escaped the tide of development that has washed over much of the state's Pacific shores. The era of rural tranquillity may have come to an official end this week, however, with a sweeping decision by the San Luis Obispo County Board of Supervisors to relax growth controls, paving the way for commercial and residential construction on 2,000 acres of coastal hills and meadows.
NEWS
April 25, 1994 | MARIA L. La GANGA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There are streets here where the porches are deep, the shade is cool and the spring flowers billow thick as clouds, where old men doze over the Sunday paper and children build castles out of sheets and sagging wicker lounges. And then there are the suburbs of the last 10 years, largely populated by fleeing Angelenos, where certain houses have "a double garage door and a blank wall (as) the only presentation to the street," says Glen Matteson, associate city planner.
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