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San Luis Obispo County Development And Redevelopment

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NEWS
January 16, 1998 | FRANK CLIFFORD, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
The California Coastal Commission rejected a Central Coast plan late Thursday that would have allowed the Hearst Corp. to build a large oceanfront resort complex along one of the most scenic and undisturbed sections of the state's coastline. In its 9-3 vote, the commission rejected an effort by San Luis Obispo County supervisors to ease coastal regulations on new development, which would have accommodated the Hearst Corp.'
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 13, 2001 | KENNETH R. WEISS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Moving to protect one of the last unblemished stretches of the state's shoreline, the California Coastal Commission on Thursday recommended sweeping zoning changes in San Luis Obispo County that would prevent Hearst Corp. from building anything that could be seen from California 1, any roadway turnout or from the ocean. The commission's efforts to push for changes in local zoning rules are only recommendations. The ultimate authority remains with San Luis Obispo County.
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NEWS
January 7, 1990 | FRANK CLIFFORD, TIMES URBAN AFFAIRS WRITER
In the perfect solitude of the Santa Lucia Mountains beside an old family graveyard where deer and wild pigs are the only regular visitors, the great-grandson of a pioneer rancher talked about "Los Angelization" in a tone of voice normally reserved for drought or taxes. "It could be the ruination of our way of life if something isn't done about it pretty soon," said Billy Warren, whose family acquired their 10,000-acre cattle ranch in the late 1800s.
NEWS
January 16, 1998 | FRANK CLIFFORD, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
The California Coastal Commission rejected a Central Coast plan late Thursday that would have allowed the Hearst Corp. to build a large oceanfront resort complex along one of the most scenic and undisturbed sections of the state's coastline. In its 9-3 vote, the commission rejected an effort by San Luis Obispo County supervisors to ease coastal regulations on new development, which would have accommodated the Hearst Corp.'
NEWS
December 26, 1997 | STEPHANIE SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Forget the lovey-dovey name. Forget the sappy story that feuds must not be carried into town. Just forget it. Please. Because Harmony has, of late, dissolved in discord. And folks in this tiny Central Coast town just south of Hearst Castle are in quite the snit about it. "I don't think Harmony has ever been this unharmonious," one local grumbled. Added another, with scowling sarcasm: "They should rename this town."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 13, 2001 | KENNETH R. WEISS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Moving to protect one of the last unblemished stretches of the state's shoreline, the California Coastal Commission on Thursday recommended sweeping zoning changes in San Luis Obispo County that would prevent Hearst Corp. from building anything that could be seen from California 1, any roadway turnout or from the ocean. The commission's efforts to push for changes in local zoning rules are only recommendations. The ultimate authority remains with San Luis Obispo County.
NEWS
December 26, 1997 | STEPHANIE SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Forget the lovey-dovey name. Forget the sappy story that feuds must not be carried into town. Just forget it. Please. Because Harmony has, of late, dissolved in discord. And folks in this tiny Central Coast town just south of Hearst Castle are in quite the snit about it. "I don't think Harmony has ever been this unharmonious," one local grumbled. Added another, with scowling sarcasm: "They should rename this town."
NEWS
January 7, 1990 | FRANK CLIFFORD, TIMES URBAN AFFAIRS WRITER
In the perfect solitude of the Santa Lucia Mountains beside an old family graveyard where deer and wild pigs are the only regular visitors, the great-grandson of a pioneer rancher talked about "Los Angelization" in a tone of voice normally reserved for drought or taxes. "It could be the ruination of our way of life if something isn't done about it pretty soon," said Billy Warren, whose family acquired their 10,000-acre cattle ranch in the late 1800s.
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