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San Luis Rey River

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 11, 1987
A 9-year-old Oceanside boy died Thursday night after falling into the San Luis Rey River just north of Cypress Street in Oceanside, where he had been playing, authorities said. Joseph Randolph and a friend had been wading along the river shore Thursday afternoon when Randolph apparently slipped and went under, Deputy Coroner Gerald Hillbrand said. "The Oceanside police and paramedics responded, but they didn't find the boy for several hours," Hillbrand said.
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OPINION
July 10, 2010 | By Pam Slater-Price
Imagine arriving at your church only to find it filled to its rafters with garbage. Imagine being one of hundreds of thousands of people who depend on an aquifer for drinking water as out-of-town interests hatch plans to bury more than 30 million tons of trash on top of it. Imagine a land-use debate that spans more than two decades, with dogged speculators pushing for a trash dump despite evidence that the spot they've picked is fatally flawed....
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 2, 1986 | ERIC BAILEY
Back before 1984, the Guajome Mesa subdivision, a knot of single-story homes on the southern bank of the San Luis Rey River, faced a predicament year-in and year-out. During dry spells, neighbors would cross the San Luis Rey by driving over a temporary road laid on the river bottom. But when the river waters began to rise with winter rains, the neighborhood was virtually cut off from the schools, parks and shopping centers on the other side.
TRAVEL
November 12, 2000 | SUSAN JAMES, Susan James is a freelance writer based in La Canada Flintridge
I'm mad about missions. I've had a passion for them ever since I carved a lopsided version of San Miguel Arcangel out of an Ivory soap bar for a fourth-grade project. The appeal is obvious to me: In California, we rarely see and experience places that are as old or filled with as much history. The atmosphere is haunting, often mysterious. That's why I found myself exploring San Diego County's back country one weekend in July with my mom, Barbara Harrison, and my sister, Linda Franco.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 13, 1992 | JONATHAN GAW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than a year after its owners promised to restore sand illegally taken from the San Luis Rey River, a San Diego mining company still has not made a move to bring back the sand or remove its mining equipment. Prosecutors now seek to put the owners of Marron Bros. Inc., which has a history of such environment-damaging violations, in jail until the work is done. "As far as I'm concerned, they've behaved like river pirates," Deputy Dist. Atty. Gary Rempel said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 20, 1992 | JONATHAN GAW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The San Luis Rey River is peaceful now. That's either good or bad, depending on whom you talk to. Three years ago, there were six sand-mining firms along the river from Bonsall to the ocean. Now there is only one--the H.G. Fenton Material Co. Stepped-up enforcement of environmental regulations by federal, state and local agencies over the past five years has led numerous sand miners to go out of business or be shut down for permit violations. One firm--J.W. Sand and Materials Inc.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 20, 1987 | JENIFER WARREN, Times Staff Writer
Near the North County village of Pala, on a dusty, sun-baked slope overlooking the San Luis Rey River, Father Mirko Flac is trying to work miracles in a rustic cluster of buildings called the Pala Rey Youth Camp. Each summer, Flac plucks 600 kids from pockets of poverty throughout Southern California and plops them down at the camp for some fresh air and healthy living.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 18, 1992 | TIM MAYER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Sometime in April, a small, gray, male songbird from Mexico laid claim to a patch of willow forest along the San Luis Rey River in Oceanside and let loose its long, warbling song. The sound attracted a female, and the birds mated and built a nest in the thick brush. Two months later, the nest was full of chicks. That seemingly common event has caused excitement and cautious optimism among city, federal, and state officials, as well as wildlife biologists.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 26, 1991 | RAY TESSLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There's scant sign of rain, let alone the hint of flooding, but long-awaited work has begun on the main portion of a $66-million flood-control project in the notorious San Luis Rey River Valley. Workers are building rock-walled levees, drainage ponds and habitat for the endangered least Bell's vireo between Priory Road and the Foussat Bridge in Oceanside along a riverbed that's prone to periodic flooding.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 21, 1992 | RICHARD CORE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Three San Diego County sand-mining companies have been ordered by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to stop depositing sand and gravel into the San Luis Rey River, a practice the agency says has changed the river's flow, damaged vegetation and possibly threatened the habitat of an endangered bird. The order was issued Monday to H.G. Fenton Material Co. of Pala, Sand & Gravel of Bonsall and L.E. Morrison Co. of Bonita. Fenton is the only company still operating along the San Luis Rey.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 12, 1992 | JOHN M. GLIONNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Oceanside has decided to play hardball with several dozen homeless people, ordering them to vacate their makeshift shelters in the San Luis Rey River Valley within 10 days or face arrest. In an early-morning sweep Monday, city officials gave written notices to about two dozen people, informing them to move both themselves and their belongings before Aug. 20 or become subject to arrest for trespassing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 21, 1992 | RICHARD CORE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Three San Diego County sand-mining companies have been ordered by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to stop depositing sand and gravel into the San Luis Rey River, a practice the agency says has changed the river's flow, damaged vegetation and possibly threatened the habitat of an endangered bird. The order was issued Monday to H.G. Fenton Material Co. of Pala, Sand & Gravel of Bonsall and L.E. Morrison Co. of Bonita. Fenton is the only company still operating along the San Luis Rey.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 20, 1992 | JONATHAN GAW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The San Luis Rey River is peaceful now. That's either good or bad, depending on whom you talk to. Three years ago, there were six sand-mining firms along the river from Bonsall to the ocean. Now there is only one--the H.G. Fenton Material Co. Stepped-up enforcement of environmental regulations by federal, state and local agencies over the past five years has led numerous sand miners to go out of business or be shut down for permit violations. One firm--J.W. Sand and Materials Inc.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 18, 1992 | TIM MAYER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Sometime in April, a small, gray, male songbird from Mexico laid claim to a patch of willow forest along the San Luis Rey River in Oceanside and let loose its long, warbling song. The sound attracted a female, and the birds mated and built a nest in the thick brush. Two months later, the nest was full of chicks. That seemingly common event has caused excitement and cautious optimism among city, federal, and state officials, as well as wildlife biologists.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 17, 1992 | JONATHAN GAW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The owners of a local sand-mining company were sentenced to nearly a year in jail Tuesday after a Vista Municipal Court judge found them in contempt of court for failing to repair damage from their gross over-excavation along the San Luis Rey River. Exasperated with the failure of brothers Sylvester and Reginald Marron to comply with his order more than a year ago, Judge Victor E.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 13, 1992 | JONATHAN GAW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than a year after its owners promised to restore sand illegally taken from the San Luis Rey River, a San Diego mining company still has not made a move to bring back the sand or remove its mining equipment. Prosecutors now seek to put the owners of Marron Bros. Inc., which has a history of such environment-damaging violations, in jail until the work is done. "As far as I'm concerned, they've behaved like river pirates," Deputy Dist. Atty. Gary Rempel said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 17, 1992 | JONATHAN GAW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The owners of a local sand-mining company were sentenced to nearly a year in jail Tuesday after a Vista Municipal Court judge found them in contempt of court for failing to repair damage from their gross over-excavation along the San Luis Rey River. Exasperated with the failure of brothers Sylvester and Reginald Marron to comply with his order more than a year ago, Judge Victor E.
NEWS
May 16, 1991
We have lived beside the San Luis Rey River for 14 years. We were here for the winter storms of '80 and '81 when the river was a quarter of a mile wide here. At that time you could see the sand going into the ocean from the river for half a mile at the mouth of the San Luis Rey River. Now the county Department of Planning and Land Use seems to be so in need of money that it has given, or sold, permits to at least six companies to mine the sand of the San Luis Rey River so none can reach the ocean to return to the beaches in the spring and summer, as nature intended.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 26, 1991 | RAY TESSLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There's scant sign of rain, let alone the hint of flooding, but long-awaited work has begun on the main portion of a $66-million flood-control project in the notorious San Luis Rey River Valley. Workers are building rock-walled levees, drainage ponds and habitat for the endangered least Bell's vireo between Priory Road and the Foussat Bridge in Oceanside along a riverbed that's prone to periodic flooding.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 2, 1991
A 26-year-old Marine from Camp Pendleton died when he was hit by a car while trying to run across a freeway, California Highway Patrol officials said. Cpl. Roy Henriquez Jr. died at 5:34 a.m. Sunday at Scripps Memorial Hospital, about two hours after he was struck by a car driven by Jeffrey Lysgaard, 25, of Newport Beach, Officer Jerry Bohrer said. Henriquez, who had a blood-alcohol level of 0.23 (a level of 0.
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