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San Marino Ca Ordinances

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 13, 1997 | RICHARD WINTON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
After San Marino homeowners and security firms sounded the alarm over a proposed local law to limit the number of security signs, the City Council responded Wednesday by putting off a vote on the law until February. Council members told more than 60 residents packing the council chamber that they need time to study the issue. Some members, however, said they back restrictions.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 10, 2001 | RICHARD WINTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Amid San Marino's grandiose homes and manicured lawns, city leaders this week will ponder the all-important issue of how to ensure life, liberty and the pursuit of a quiet weekend. The City Council in this wealthy, conservative enclave Wednesday will consider a ban on the use of motorized landscape equipment on Saturday afternoons, Sundays and public holidays. Simply put: Use a power lawn mower, chain saw or weed whacker, you'll be cited and may even go to jail.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 13, 1987
In an attempt to control density in residential areas, San Marino has adopted building restrictions setting a maximum of six bedrooms for new houses. Ordinances adopted by the City Council also require that each house occupy no more than 30% of its lot and have side yards at least eight feet wide. Houses with up to four bedrooms must have a two-car garage, and homes with up to six bedrooms must have one additional parking space.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 22, 1999 | RICHARD WINTON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In San Marino, where homeowners must obey some of the country's strictest aesthetic regulations, the house on Somerset Place stands out like a beat-up Pinto on Rodeo Drive. Neighbors in this conservative enclave of stately homes call it the "jungle." The front garden's shrubs and cactuses obscure the one-story bungalow in a city that cites people for dead lawns or leaving a car in a driveway for a few days.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 10, 2001 | RICHARD WINTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Amid San Marino's grandiose homes and manicured lawns, city leaders this week will ponder the all-important issue of how to ensure life, liberty and the pursuit of a quiet weekend. The City Council in this wealthy, conservative enclave Wednesday will consider a ban on the use of motorized landscape equipment on Saturday afternoons, Sundays and public holidays. Simply put: Use a power lawn mower, chain saw or weed whacker, you'll be cited and may even go to jail.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 12, 1997
The City Council, tired of construction projects that leave neighbors enduring noise, dust and unsightly lots for years, has enacted a law that levies fines for failure to complete work within a designated time. The city is among the first in the San Gabriel Valley to impose a timetable for builders. Under the law, approved by the council late Wednesday, a property owner would have six months to complete a $50,000 project, nine months for $100,000 project and a year to finish a $250,000 project.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 11, 1992
Bending to intense public opposition, the San Marino City Council rejected a proposal to relax the city's longstanding prohibition on the sale of beer and wine in restaurants. Despite backing from three council members, the vote was 4 to 0 against the change, bringing cheers from a crowd of about 30.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 11, 1997 | KEN ELLINGWOOD and AMY OAKES, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The San Marino City Council tentatively agreed Wednesday night to drop its ban on selling alcohol in restaurants--a tradition that made the city the nearest thing to a dry town in California. The 5-0 vote came after supporters argued that allowing sales of beer and wine would make it easier to lure upscale restaurants to several commercial pockets along Huntington Drive. A second and final vote on the issue will be taken Jan. 14.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 22, 1999 | RICHARD WINTON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In San Marino, where homeowners must obey some of the country's strictest aesthetic regulations, the house on Somerset Place stands out like a beat-up Pinto on Rodeo Drive. Neighbors in this conservative enclave of stately homes call it the "jungle." The front garden's shrubs and cactuses obscure the one-story bungalow in a city that cites people for dead lawns or leaving a car in a driveway for a few days.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 1, 1998 | RICHARD WINTON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
San Marino is a conservative enclave of stately homes and manicured lawns whose residents detest Big Government. Two out of three vote Republican. Local government, however, is another matter. It doesn't take much to break the law in San Marino, prompting residents to warn newcomers: If you have to ask, it's probably illegal. There are laws against leaving a car in the driveway for a few days, and running a remote control toy in the local park.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 1, 1998 | RICHARD WINTON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
San Marino is a conservative enclave of stately homes and manicured lawns whose residents detest Big Government. Two out of three vote Republican. Local government, however, is another matter. It doesn't take much to break the law in San Marino, prompting residents to warn newcomers: If you have to ask, it's probably illegal. There are laws against leaving a car in the driveway for a few days, and running a remote control toy in the local park.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 11, 1997 | KEN ELLINGWOOD and AMY OAKES, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The San Marino City Council tentatively agreed Wednesday night to drop its ban on selling alcohol in restaurants--a tradition that made the city the nearest thing to a dry town in California. The 5-0 vote came after supporters argued that allowing sales of beer and wine would make it easier to lure upscale restaurants to several commercial pockets along Huntington Drive. A second and final vote on the issue will be taken Jan. 14.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 13, 1997 | RICHARD WINTON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
After San Marino homeowners and security firms sounded the alarm over a proposed local law to limit the number of security signs, the City Council responded Wednesday by putting off a vote on the law until February. Council members told more than 60 residents packing the council chamber that they need time to study the issue. Some members, however, said they back restrictions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 12, 1997
The City Council, tired of construction projects that leave neighbors enduring noise, dust and unsightly lots for years, has enacted a law that levies fines for failure to complete work within a designated time. The city is among the first in the San Gabriel Valley to impose a timetable for builders. Under the law, approved by the council late Wednesday, a property owner would have six months to complete a $50,000 project, nine months for $100,000 project and a year to finish a $250,000 project.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 11, 1992
Bending to intense public opposition, the San Marino City Council rejected a proposal to relax the city's longstanding prohibition on the sale of beer and wine in restaurants. Despite backing from three council members, the vote was 4 to 0 against the change, bringing cheers from a crowd of about 30.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 13, 1987
In an attempt to control density in residential areas, San Marino has adopted building restrictions setting a maximum of six bedrooms for new houses. Ordinances adopted by the City Council also require that each house occupy no more than 30% of its lot and have side yards at least eight feet wide. Houses with up to four bedrooms must have a two-car garage, and homes with up to six bedrooms must have one additional parking space.
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