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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 27, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A woman who has covered her roof and property with painted slogans she calls messages from God has been ordered to remove them or face fines or jail. The San Mateo City Council unanimously ruled last week that Estrella Benavides' garbled writings alleging government conspiracies violate city codes regulating the size of signs.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 27, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A woman who has covered her roof and property with painted slogans she calls messages from God has been ordered to remove them or face fines or jail. The San Mateo City Council unanimously ruled last week that Estrella Benavides' garbled writings alleging government conspiracies violate city codes regulating the size of signs.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 30, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
About 200 people who work for or attend Aragon High School will be tested for tuberculosis after a student was hospitalized with the disease. The boy, whose name and grade level were withheld, was hospitalized in mid-April and later diagnosed with pulmonary tuberculosis, said Sam Stebbins, San Mateo County's deputy health officer. The school learned of the boy's diagnosis Tuesday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 30, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
About 200 people who work for or attend Aragon High School will be tested for tuberculosis after a student was hospitalized with the disease. The boy, whose name and grade level were withheld, was hospitalized in mid-April and later diagnosed with pulmonary tuberculosis, said Sam Stebbins, San Mateo County's deputy health officer. The school learned of the boy's diagnosis Tuesday.
TRAVEL
December 31, 2006
"WE had a wonderful week in Normandy, traveling to historical and cultural sites from this centrally situated bed and breakfast. A charming couple maintain a clean and accommodating business. They were helpful, spoke English, French and Italian. We highly recommend it." Doubles from $53. La Chantaliere, Hameau Lucas, 50580 Fierville les Mines; 011-33-2-33-03-05-74, www.LaChantaliere.com.
NEWS
December 8, 1999 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Robert A. Swanson, co-founder and pioneering leader of Genentech Inc., which as one of the first and most successful companies in the burgeoning biotechnology industry developed human insulin and human growth hormone, has died. Swanson, a financial wizard with a chemistry degree who left Genentech in 1996, died Monday of brain cancer at his home in Hillsborough, a San Francisco suburb. He was 52. Most recently, Swanson had been chairman of the board of Tularik Inc.
TRAVEL
September 10, 1995 | KARIN DOMINELLO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Prince and princess wanna-bes are invited to the Viennese Imperial Ball on a seven-day tour to Austria that leaves Dec. 27. Each New Year's Eve at the historic Vienna Hofburg (Imperial Palace) horse-drawn carriages deliver guests into a Cinderella atmosphere of gala banqueting, music, dancing, sparkling champagne and--at midnight--entertainment provided by the singers and dancers of the Vienna Volksoper and Vienna State Opera. Participants stay in Salzburg and Vienna.
NEWS
September 28, 1997 | MIKE FEINSILBER, ASSOCIATED PRESS
It is the 1950s, and in Tokyo and New York two guys in white shirts, ties undone, are communicating electronically with the latest technology. "SOS ETWIFE HEADS TOKYOWARD SMORNING SANSTOP," New York tells Tokyo. "MUCHLY APC EYEBALL ARRIVAL. URGENTEST NEED THUMBSUCKER CUM ART." These were marching orders for the fellow in Tokyo. Put into English, the message said, "The secretary of state and his wife will fly nonstop to Tokyo this morning.
NEWS
December 13, 1999 | MARTHA GROVES and RICHARD LEE COLVIN, TIMES EDUCATION WRITERS
After enduring a "living hell" before getting her sixth-grade son into a school for learning disabled children, Kristi Wicker resists the urge to imagine "What if?" What if Kyle had not languished for six years in a Long Beach public elementary school without proper instruction? What if teachers and school psychologists had identified his dyslexia--and helped him compensate for it--before he slipped years behind his peers in reading ability? "It's best to put that behind me," Wicker said.
NEWS
April 10, 1990 | ASHLEY DUNN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It first came to Alex Beanum during his campaign for the Cerritos City Council 12 years ago, when he figured he knocked on at least half the doors in this quiet enclave of stucco tract homes. As he trudged through neighborhoods that looked like a bland, cookie-cutter version of middle-class suburbia, it suddenly hit him: whoosh . . . the smell of curry. Next house: the sizzling aroma of soy sauce and peanut oil.
NEWS
December 12, 1999 | RICHARD LEE COLVIN and DUKE HELFAND, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Tens of thousands of students in California's special education system have been placed there not because of a serious mental or emotional handicap, but because they were never taught to read properly. Failed by mainstream classes and teachers, they are then referred to special education and labeled "learning disabled." There they are failed a second time, by a badly flawed system designed to be their safety net.
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