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San Mateo County Ca Elections

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NEWS
November 7, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Voters in Concord appeared narrowly in favor of removing the Bay Area city's protection of homosexuals from discrimination, after a campaign spurred by Christian fundamentalist groups. With a small number of absentee ballots left to be counted from Tuesday's election, Proposition M in the city led by just over 100 votes. The measure strips the words "sexual orientation" from Concord's discrimination law.
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NEWS
November 7, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Voters in Concord appeared narrowly in favor of removing the Bay Area city's protection of homosexuals from discrimination, after a campaign spurred by Christian fundamentalist groups. With a small number of absentee ballots left to be counted from Tuesday's election, Proposition M in the city led by just over 100 votes. The measure strips the words "sexual orientation" from Concord's discrimination law.
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NEWS
August 29, 1988
San Mateo County Supervisor Tom Nolan has become the first openly gay candidate to be chosen by his party to run for the state Senate. The Democratic central committees of San Mateo and Santa Clara counties chose Nolan, 43, to run against incumbent Republican Becky Morgan in the 11th Senate District. The candidate said he does not expect his homosexuality to play a significant role in the election because district voters are "among the most sophisticated and highly educated in the country."
NEWS
August 29, 1988
San Mateo County Supervisor Tom Nolan has become the first openly gay candidate to be chosen by his party to run for the state Senate. The Democratic central committees of San Mateo and Santa Clara counties chose Nolan, 43, to run against incumbent Republican Becky Morgan in the 11th Senate District. The candidate said he does not expect his homosexuality to play a significant role in the election because district voters are "among the most sophisticated and highly educated in the country."
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