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OPINION
October 19, 2003
Re "Native Trout in This Southland Stream Will Get a Fighting Chance to Survive," Sept. 3: I commend the Trout Unlimited organization for its efforts to preserve one of our most important natural habitats: San Mateo Creek, home to rare steelhead trout. The natural treasures that call the area home depend on clean water from the San Mateo Creek watershed not affected by development. Our quality of life in Orange County and that of future generations are closely linked to this important source of clean water, clean air and open space.
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NEWS
June 20, 2013 | By Karin Klein
It's almost impossible to avoid cliched driving metaphors to describe what happens repeatedly to the proposal to build a toll highway in southeastern Orange County - and happened again Wednesday evening. The plans for the shorter and renamed Foothill South extension hit another roadblock. A red light. They were slowed, or possibly ground to a halt. In any case, the San Diego Regional Quality Control Board delivered an unexpected "no" to a project that was just a fraction of the Transportation Corridor Agencies' original plan to build 16 miles of turnpike from eastern Orange County through San Onofre State Beach in northern San Diego County.
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SPORTS
August 19, 1999 | MARTIN BECK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dan Ryan remembers a time when trout were biting not far from his San Clemente home. In the late 1930s and early '40s, he could jump in his '29 Chevy and drive a couple miles south to San Mateo Creek, where he would fish for steelhead, a variety of rainbow trout that spends about half its life in the ocean. He often pulled out large trout, including a pair of 30-inchers he proudly displays in a yellowing snapshot tucked into the frame of a mirror in his Mission Viejo home.
OPINION
May 16, 2005
Re "They'd Pave Over Reagan's Park," Opinion, May 8: Environmental protection and transportation improvements are important characteristics of the Orange County lifestyle. The Foothill-South toll road will be one of the most environmentally friendly roadways ever built. Foothill-South is a four-lane road -- hardly huge by Southern California standards -- which will skirt the inland portion of the San Onofre State Park. This area is separated from the beach by the existing Interstate 5. Additionally, the San Mateo Campground would remain untouched and the new road would connect to I-5 with bridges to minimize impacts to San Mateo Creek and surrounding wetlands.
OPINION
September 8, 2003
Re "Native Trout to Get Fighting Chance in Southland Creek," Sept. 3: Having helped pull hundreds of bullheads and other nonnative fish out of the deep pools of upper San Mateo Creek, I can attest to the importance of the work that Trout Unlimited and others are doing to protect one of our region's last free-flowing coastal streams and its steelhead trout. Unfortunately, at the same time that private citizens are taking responsibility for restoring this creek, Orange County bureaucrats are moving forward to approve two massive construction projects that threaten the creek.
MAGAZINE
October 31, 1999
In your Oct. 3 article by Ed Leibowitz ("Saving the Steelhead," So SoCal), Toby Shackelford claims that the Transportation Corridor Agencies wants to build pillars for the Foothill Transportation Corridor in a specific location where he caught a steelhead trout in San Mateo Creek. The quote in the story is: "Unfortunately, they want to build pillars right where my spot is." Preliminary plans for the corridor identify just four to six bridge pillars where the road would cross San Mateo Creek.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 11, 1985
Deer Drowns in Sea:A small deer, apparently frightened by people on the beach at San Clemente State Park, took to the ocean Wednesday and swam about half a mile off shore where it drowned moments before a lifeguard rescue boat could reach it. State Lifeguard Carl Drake, operator of the high-speed boat Surfwatch, said the 80-pound doe probably wandered onto the beach from the open country around San Mateo Creek near the line between Orange and San Diego counties.
OPINION
May 16, 2005
Re "They'd Pave Over Reagan's Park," Opinion, May 8: Environmental protection and transportation improvements are important characteristics of the Orange County lifestyle. The Foothill-South toll road will be one of the most environmentally friendly roadways ever built. Foothill-South is a four-lane road -- hardly huge by Southern California standards -- which will skirt the inland portion of the San Onofre State Park. This area is separated from the beach by the existing Interstate 5. Additionally, the San Mateo Campground would remain untouched and the new road would connect to I-5 with bridges to minimize impacts to San Mateo Creek and surrounding wetlands.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 30, 2001
Regarding the proposed Foothill South toll road, which threatens to pave over prime natural habitat and pollute the pristine San Mateo Creek, we should consider that the high-growth movement, driven by developers and road-builders, has used a highly successful strategy for spurring development and roads. First, high-growth proponents find a previously undeveloped parcel. Then, to acquire the roads needed to develop that land, they promote the idea of a looming transportation disaster.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 10, 2000
I have been reading the recent articles about the toll roads and how they are supposed to solve California's transportation problem when our population increases by a projected 15 million people in the next two decades. The non-compete provisions where the public sector agrees to restrict road development will serve only to exacerbate the problem. Maybe the toll road bond-holders will be sure to make more money, but our quality of life in Orange County will suffer without the ability to build adequate free transportation routes to accommodate our rapid population growth.
OPINION
October 19, 2003
Re "Native Trout in This Southland Stream Will Get a Fighting Chance to Survive," Sept. 3: I commend the Trout Unlimited organization for its efforts to preserve one of our most important natural habitats: San Mateo Creek, home to rare steelhead trout. The natural treasures that call the area home depend on clean water from the San Mateo Creek watershed not affected by development. Our quality of life in Orange County and that of future generations are closely linked to this important source of clean water, clean air and open space.
OPINION
September 8, 2003
Re "Native Trout to Get Fighting Chance in Southland Creek," Sept. 3: Having helped pull hundreds of bullheads and other nonnative fish out of the deep pools of upper San Mateo Creek, I can attest to the importance of the work that Trout Unlimited and others are doing to protect one of our region's last free-flowing coastal streams and its steelhead trout. Unfortunately, at the same time that private citizens are taking responsibility for restoring this creek, Orange County bureaucrats are moving forward to approve two massive construction projects that threaten the creek.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 3, 2003 | Stanley Allison, Times Staff Writer
John Waters remembers fishing with his friends in San Mateo Creek in the 1930s and '40s, catching steelhead trout as big as his arm. He'd bring them home and the family would have trout for dinner. "You could catch four or five if you had a good day," Waters, 84, said. Sometime in the '40s, however, the native steelhead seemed to disappear from the creek, which runs about 18 miles from the upper reaches of the Cleveland National Forest to Trestles Beach, south of San Clemente.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 30, 2001
Regarding the proposed Foothill South toll road, which threatens to pave over prime natural habitat and pollute the pristine San Mateo Creek, we should consider that the high-growth movement, driven by developers and road-builders, has used a highly successful strategy for spurring development and roads. First, high-growth proponents find a previously undeveloped parcel. Then, to acquire the roads needed to develop that land, they promote the idea of a looming transportation disaster.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 5, 2001
Re "Caltrans to Fix Drains on Tollway," July 19: The TCA [Orange County Transportation Corridor Agencies] touts the toll road as a private-sector solution to a private-sector problem. But how can this be? Its ridership projections have been consistently overblown, it is hemorrhaging money and relies on publicly funded Caltrans for maintenance. In addition, the TCA has boondoggled the public by having Caltrans sign [non-competing] agreements to ensure the road's success. The proposed Foothill South toll road represents an extension of this corporate welfare project--a project the TCA wished to unload on the public to benefit their true constituency: the developers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 26, 2000 | CHRIS CEBALLOS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Armed with a report showing that San Mateo Creek is far cleaner than neighboring Aliso and San Juan Creeks, environmentalists on Thursday called for a halt to development of the Foothill South toll road, which would cross the stream. The $644-million, 16-mile toll road, proposed by the Transportation Corridor Agencies, would connect Oso Parkway to Interstate 5 south of San Clemente, crossing San Onofre State Park and San Mateo Creek.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 5, 2001
Re "Caltrans to Fix Drains on Tollway," July 19: The TCA [Orange County Transportation Corridor Agencies] touts the toll road as a private-sector solution to a private-sector problem. But how can this be? Its ridership projections have been consistently overblown, it is hemorrhaging money and relies on publicly funded Caltrans for maintenance. In addition, the TCA has boondoggled the public by having Caltrans sign [non-competing] agreements to ensure the road's success. The proposed Foothill South toll road represents an extension of this corporate welfare project--a project the TCA wished to unload on the public to benefit their true constituency: the developers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 17, 1999
The Oct. 10 Times had three letters ("Blessings for Toll Roads") praising the personal convenience of the toll roads. What none of these writers mentioned was the destruction of prime open space that has occurred in placing these roads, and which would occur if the Foothill toll road is extended. Also missing from their letters is the obvious fact that the Foothill extension just adds more traffic--no more lanes--to I-5 going south, just as the San Joaquin Toll road did to I-405 going north from Newport Beach.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 10, 2000
I have been reading the recent articles about the toll roads and how they are supposed to solve California's transportation problem when our population increases by a projected 15 million people in the next two decades. The non-compete provisions where the public sector agrees to restrict road development will serve only to exacerbate the problem. Maybe the toll road bond-holders will be sure to make more money, but our quality of life in Orange County will suffer without the ability to build adequate free transportation routes to accommodate our rapid population growth.
MAGAZINE
October 31, 1999
In your Oct. 3 article by Ed Leibowitz ("Saving the Steelhead," So SoCal), Toby Shackelford claims that the Transportation Corridor Agencies wants to build pillars for the Foothill Transportation Corridor in a specific location where he caught a steelhead trout in San Mateo Creek. The quote in the story is: "Unfortunately, they want to build pillars right where my spot is." Preliminary plans for the corridor identify just four to six bridge pillars where the road would cross San Mateo Creek.
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