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San Miguel

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ENTERTAINMENT
September 16, 2012 | By Hector Tobar
San Miguel A Novel T.C. Boyle Viking: 367 pp., $27.95 T.C. Boyle's new novel, "San Miguel," is written to the natural rhythms of a distant, isolated place, and to the human rhythms of tormented souls. San Miguel Island is a real place, the westernmost of the Channel Islands off the coast of Southern California. In Boyle's book, it's a patch of earth beyond the end of the western frontier, a place where the mythical western ethos makes its last stand. "Terra incognita," one of his characters calls it. "Terra insolita … the last scrap of land the continent had to offer, an island tossed out in the ocean like an afterthought.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 16, 2012 | By Hector Tobar
San Miguel A Novel T.C. Boyle Viking: 367 pp., $27.95 T.C. Boyle's new novel, "San Miguel," is written to the natural rhythms of a distant, isolated place, and to the human rhythms of tormented souls. San Miguel Island is a real place, the westernmost of the Channel Islands off the coast of Southern California. In Boyle's book, it's a patch of earth beyond the end of the western frontier, a place where the mythical western ethos makes its last stand. "Terra incognita," one of his characters calls it. "Terra insolita … the last scrap of land the continent had to offer, an island tossed out in the ocean like an afterthought.
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SPORTS
January 12, 2003 | BOB MIESZERSKI
No 3-year-old winner of the San Miguel Stakes, which will be run for the 46th time today, has ever gone on to win the Santa Anita Derby. The streak won't end this year. In fact, it would be one of the biggest upsets in recent memory if any of the six scheduled to run in the six-furlong San Miguel are in the starting gate when the Derby is run April 5.
NEWS
February 8, 2011 | By Benoit Lebourgeois, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Upscale Rosewood Hotels & Resort group has opened a  property in San Miguel de Allende , a cosmopolitan city in the central highlands of Mexico with a colonial past that's a favorite of artists and American expatriates. Accommodations come with a balcony or a terrace, and views of the town’s historic center, a short stroll down cobblestone streets. The 67-room hotel with colonial-style arches is Rosewood’s third property in Mexico. The deal:   The hotel opens its doors with introductory rates starting at $295 a night, including breakfast for two  and a 25% discount on spa treatments.
TRAVEL
December 21, 1986 | MICHELE GRIMM and TOM GRIMM, The Grimms of Laguna Beach are authors of "Away for the Weekend," a travel guide to Southern California.
For travelers drawn to California's famed missions during the Christmas holidays, don't overlook Mission San Miguel Arcangel. That impressive reminder of Spanish times is just off the U.S. 101 freeway between Los Angeles and San Francisco. Founded in 1797 as the 16th in the chain of 21 missions that extend from San Diego to Sonoma, San Miguel has the most striking church interior of them all. Its walls are decorated with colorful frescoes that have survived for 162 years.
SPORTS
January 13, 2003 | Bob Mieszerski, Times Staff Writer
Making his Santa Anita debut on Sunday, Omega Code showed he could win at a place other than a county fair. Owner of a maiden win at Fairplex Park and a stakes victory at Fresno, the 3-year-old son of Elusive Quality beat pacesetter Only The Best by a length to win the $107,800 San Miguel Stakes. Owned by Dan Butler, Mike Moore and trainer Wesley Ward, the 9-5 second choice was ridden by Martin Pedroza and completed the six furlongs in 1:08 3/5.
TRAVEL
March 8, 1992 | JOHN McKINNEY
San Miguel is the westernmost of the Channel Islands, the farthest from park headquarters and the one most prized by island connoisseurs. Only in the last few years has it been open to people other than scientists and military personnel. Owned by the U.S. Navy, which once used it as a bombing site and missile tracking station, San Miguel is now managed by the National Park Service. Wildlife abounds on San Miguel.
HOME & GARDEN
March 27, 2008 | Lisa Boone
THERE is no "San Miguel style," writes Jorge Almada in the foreword of this coffee table book. Only "an amalgamation of influences," says the co-founder of the Casamidy design store in the Mexican town of San Miguel de Allende. Writer Annie Kelly and her husband, photographer Tim Street-Porter, highlight that diversity in narratives paired with captivating photographs that provide a real sense of why so many expatriates are flocking to this colony of artists.
NEWS
June 11, 1990 | JOANNA M. MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sixty miles off the coast stands a ghostly forest like no other in the world. On wind-swept San Miguel Island, the western-most island in the Channel Islands National Park, is the caliche forest, an ancient arrangement of twisted white stalks that took 10,000 years to grow. Hardly the verdant and teeming scene one might imagine, this forest instead is reminiscent of a chalky graveyard littered with skeletal shapes, the casts of trees that disappeared eons ago.
TRAVEL
October 13, 1996 | NANCY ZASLAVSKY, Zaslavasky is the author of "A Cook's Tour of Mexico" and the upcoming "Meatless Mexican Home Cooking."
This city, often called Mexico's Disneyland by Yankees, is every traveler's Mexican Fantasyland--a drop-dead gorgeous colonial hilltop town. The town's main church, La Parroquia, is the most prominent landmark and can easily be compared to a certain Sleeping Beauty's Castle, especially when it's lighted on weekend and holiday evenings.
TRAVEL
September 19, 2010
SAN MIGUEL ISLAND, CALIF. San Miguel Island day trip When, where: Sept. 25, departs from Island Packers, Ventura Harbor Highlights: The Catalina Island Conservancy and Island Packers provide the chance to explore San Miguel, the westernmost Channel Island. The day includes hiking, a visit to an 11,600-year-old Chumash site and a stop at Point Bennett, home to one of the world's densest concentrations of wildlife, including more than 30,000 seals and sea lions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 17, 2010 | By Louis Sahagun, Los Angeles Times
Michael San Miguel, an ardent conservationist known for his accomplishments in Southern California field ornithology and bird banding, died late Wednesday while conducting a spotted owl survey in the San Gabriel Mountains. He was 70. San Miguel was traversing a steep canyon along the West Fork of the San Gabriel River when he slipped and fell about 100 feet, said his son, Michael Jr. Word of the accident spread quickly throughout the Southern California birding community, which regarded the longtime Arcadia resident as a role model and mentor.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 25, 2009 | By Steve Chawkins
The earthly prospects for Mission San Miguel looked bleak. After an earthquake days before Christmas in 2003, the tottering 1818 church was declared unsafe to enter. The Diocese of Monterey and the Franciscan order were preparing to close it permanently, saying they couldn't afford to pay for crucial repairs. Outside, the 16th of California's 21 missions was surrounded by a locked chain-link fence. Inside, the moment of the San Simeon earthquake was frozen for more than a year, memorialized by shattered statues, sheared-off chunks of plaster and two withered, still-decorated Christmas trees.
BUSINESS
November 15, 2009
In the South Arroyo neighborhood Location: 320 San Miguel Road, Pasadena 91105 Asking price: $1,795,000 Previously sold for: $1,665,000 in 2005 Size: Four bedrooms and three bathrooms in 2,760 square feet Lot size: 11,292 square feet Additional features: White maple floors, saline heated pool and spa, dual-zoned cooling and heating, gas-burning fireplace, a two-vehicle carport that...
HOME & GARDEN
March 27, 2008 | Lisa Boone
THERE is no "San Miguel style," writes Jorge Almada in the foreword of this coffee table book. Only "an amalgamation of influences," says the co-founder of the Casamidy design store in the Mexican town of San Miguel de Allende. Writer Annie Kelly and her husband, photographer Tim Street-Porter, highlight that diversity in narratives paired with captivating photographs that provide a real sense of why so many expatriates are flocking to this colony of artists.
HOME & GARDEN
February 14, 2008
Regarding the stone house with thatched roof in San Miguel de Allende ["A Labor of Luck," Feb. 7]: How many hundreds of rats does Michele Connor or, better yet, her housekeeper estimate now are residents in her roof? Anyway, a thatched roof on the high plateau in the center of Mexico, a place which is close to being a desert? I know there are cloudbursts for 30 minutes every day in the summer. But, still, what a screwy idea. I have been to San Miguel many times. By the way, the natives in Huasteco use thatched roofs because they are poor.
TRAVEL
September 1, 1996 | BARBARA SHEA, NEWSDAY
It was 48 hours to Revolution Day, and the local kindergarteners were practice-parading through their Mexican village like pint-size Zapatistas--boys sporting Pancho Villa mustaches, girls rouged and ruffled. In the spirit of the occasion, they carried balloons, banners and, of course, guns, albeit toy ones. Among the cheering onlookers were many Americans, whom I first assumed were on a tour. After all, I'd just gotten off a bus myself.
TRAVEL
January 24, 1993 | BEVERLY BEYER and ED RABEY
In 1542, a Franciscan friar, Fray Juan de San Miguel, founded a mission here and named it after his patron saint. Today, this magnificent town is arguably the most colonial of any in Mexico, and the entire city has been designated a national monument. Colonial architecture is always derivative, taking the best or most pleasing aspects of another order and adapting it to the cultural, climatic or aesthetic needs of its new country.
HOME & GARDEN
February 7, 2008 | Jeff Spurrier, Special to The Times
San Miguel de Allende, Mexico MICHELE CONNOR calls her ranch "a hunting lodge where there's no hunting," 20 acres greened by fields of alfalfa and shared with six dogs, 10 horses, a dozen sheep and a couple of burros, not to mention the chickens, geese and peacocks. It's a scene that reminds Connor of childhood, when she would play with dolls and imagine an escape far from the city. "I would make little corrals and play with little animals," Connor says. "That was my fantasy.
TRAVEL
July 8, 2007 | Madeline King Porter, Special to The Times
DON EUSEBIO moves more quickly than his 86 years would suggest. But when it comes to his trade, he's slow and careful. Don Sebio, as he's known, is a basket weaver, one of many in this town that has nurtured its artists and artisans through centuries, even as it has welcomed outsiders into the fold.
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