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San Miguel Island Ca

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NEWS
December 9, 1997 | LISA FERNANDEZ, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Scores of phone calls from across the country poured into California's mammal rescue centers Monday from people alarmed that thousands of northern fur seals and California sea lions are dying on San Miguel Island. "We got 40 or 50 calls this morning," said Ann Bull, director of Friends of the Sea Lion Marine Mammal Center in Laguna Beach. "People are outraged. . . . A lot of them want to write their congressmen to change the laws so they can go out to the islands."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 18, 2005 | Cecilia Rasmussen, Times Staff Writer
He probably never set foot on the beach that bears his name. He may not even be buried on the island where a memorial marker has stood for nearly seven decades. But none of that matters to a group of history-loving San Pedro residents and volunteers. For 37 years, on the first Saturday after Labor Day, the group that calls itself the Cabrillo Landing Party disembarks ceremonially on San Miguel Island.
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NEWS
June 9, 1992 | DARYL KELLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A two-month fest of birthing, fighting and mating has begun here on one of nature's great maternity wards, 60 miles off the Ventura coast. Four thousand California sea lions have already trundled onto fine white-sand beaches to have their pups. By the end of this month, perhaps 20,000 will have given birth. If June is the month for pups, July is the month for procreation on this isolated, wind-swept western tip of Channel Islands National Park.
NEWS
December 9, 1997 | LISA FERNANDEZ, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Scores of phone calls from across the country poured into California's mammal rescue centers Monday from people alarmed that thousands of northern fur seals and California sea lions are dying on San Miguel Island. "We got 40 or 50 calls this morning," said Ann Bull, director of Friends of the Sea Lion Marine Mammal Center in Laguna Beach. "People are outraged. . . . A lot of them want to write their congressmen to change the laws so they can go out to the islands."
NEWS
June 11, 1990 | JOANNA M. MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sixty miles off the coast stands a ghostly forest like no other in the world. On wind-swept San Miguel Island, the western-most island in the Channel Islands National Park, is the caliche forest, an ancient arrangement of twisted white stalks that took 10,000 years to grow. Hardly the verdant and teeming scene one might imagine, this forest instead is reminiscent of a chalky graveyard littered with skeletal shapes, the casts of trees that disappeared eons ago.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 18, 2005 | Cecilia Rasmussen, Times Staff Writer
He probably never set foot on the beach that bears his name. He may not even be buried on the island where a memorial marker has stood for nearly seven decades. But none of that matters to a group of history-loving San Pedro residents and volunteers. For 37 years, on the first Saturday after Labor Day, the group that calls itself the Cabrillo Landing Party disembarks ceremonially on San Miguel Island.
NEWS
June 9, 1992 | DARYL KELLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A two-month fest of birthing, fighting and mating has begun here on one of nature's great maternity wards, 60 miles off the Ventura coast. Four thousand California sea lions have already trundled onto fine white-sand beaches to have their pups. By the end of this month, perhaps 20,000 will have given birth. If June is the month for pups, July is the month for procreation on this isolated, wind-swept western tip of Channel Islands National Park.
NEWS
June 11, 1990 | JOANNA M. MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sixty miles off the coast stands a ghostly forest like no other in the world. On wind-swept San Miguel Island, the western-most island in the Channel Islands National Park, is the caliche forest, an ancient arrangement of twisted white stalks that took 10,000 years to grow. Hardly the verdant and teeming scene one might imagine, this forest instead is reminiscent of a chalky graveyard littered with skeletal shapes, the casts of trees that disappeared eons ago.
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