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San Nicholas Island

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 20, 1988
Recently students at Eastshore Elementary School wrote to The Times (Nov. 13) questioning the wisdom of moving sea otters to San Nicholas Island. Before Europeans nearly made them extinct by killing them for their fur, California sea otters ranged from the Northern California coast into Baja California and throughout the Channel Islands. Now California sea otters are only about one-tenth their former numbers. The existing 1,700-member sea otter colony reproduces at a 5% rate of growth, enough to support the planned transfer.
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BOOKS
November 8, 1992
History is weird. You have to wonder how Robert Radnitz (Letters, Aug. 23) could make a successful movie of "Island of the Blue Dolphins" without completely understanding the story of the "Lost Woman" of San Nicholas Island. The so-called "Lost Woman" was baptized conditionally, as Juana Maria, on her deathbed by Father Francisco Sanchez. She may not have been Chumash, for local Indians could not understand her lingo. Her language may have been Shoshonean or Kodiak. In 1811, an American sea captain under contract to the Russian American Co. placed Kodiaks on San Nicholas Island.
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NEWS
July 8, 1987 | LARRY B. STAMMER, Times Staff Writer
The California Coastal Commission on Tuesday approved a controversial plan to establish on San Nicholas Island a new colony for the threatened California sea otter. The 7-5 vote came over the objections of abalone fishermen, who said the otters' voracious appetite would reduce their catch, but it was supported by environmentalists. The commission's approval represented one of the last hurdles before the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service hopes to put its plan into effect in August.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 20, 1988
Recently students at Eastshore Elementary School wrote to The Times (Nov. 13) questioning the wisdom of moving sea otters to San Nicholas Island. Before Europeans nearly made them extinct by killing them for their fur, California sea otters ranged from the Northern California coast into Baja California and throughout the Channel Islands. Now California sea otters are only about one-tenth their former numbers. The existing 1,700-member sea otter colony reproduces at a 5% rate of growth, enough to support the planned transfer.
BOOKS
November 8, 1992
History is weird. You have to wonder how Robert Radnitz (Letters, Aug. 23) could make a successful movie of "Island of the Blue Dolphins" without completely understanding the story of the "Lost Woman" of San Nicholas Island. The so-called "Lost Woman" was baptized conditionally, as Juana Maria, on her deathbed by Father Francisco Sanchez. She may not have been Chumash, for local Indians could not understand her lingo. Her language may have been Shoshonean or Kodiak. In 1811, an American sea captain under contract to the Russian American Co. placed Kodiaks on San Nicholas Island.
NEWS
August 25, 1987 | IMBERT MATTHEE, Times Staff Writer
In an effort to protect them from potential oil spills along the California coast, federal and state wildlife biologists on Monday captured the first 15 sea otters to be moved to San Nicholas Island, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service officials said. The first sea otter was caught at 9:08 a.m., 20 minutes after the search was launched several miles off the northwest shores of San Luis Obispo County. By 4:30 p.m., biologists of the U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 13, 1988
The poor sea otters are being killed by oil spills and fishermen. How would you feel if all you wanted to do was eat, you saw your favorite food, went over to it, and got caught in some huge net. You died because you were all tangled up. Then 69 of your friends got transported to San Nicholas Island. Ten of them died. Thirteen of your very best friends ran away. Thirty-one gone. The 14 that are still alive you can't be with because you're up in sea otter heaven. Wouldn't you feel bad. That's exactly what's happening to the sea otters.
NEWS
August 26, 1987
Federal and state wildlife biologists captured seven more California sea otters off the coast of San Luis Obispo County for relocation to San Nicholas Island, bringing the total now held at the Monterey Bay Aquarium to 22, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service officials said. The first 15 were caught despite opposition from fishermen and divers who said they will file a lawsuit to stop the operation.
NEWS
November 1, 1986 | From United Press International
Two men whose small fishing boat sank in the ocean off Santa Catalina Island were plucked from the waters by a Coast Guard helicopter Friday as a search continued for a third missing crewman, authorities said. Richard Love and Brian Daly, clad in rubber suits, were lifted out of the water by the helicopter and treated by naval paramedics on San Nicholas Island, Coast Guard Petty Officer Charles Embleton said. He said they are in good condition.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 13, 1988
The poor sea otters are being killed by oil spills and fishermen. How would you feel if all you wanted to do was eat, you saw your favorite food, went over to it, and got caught in some huge net. You died because you were all tangled up. Then 69 of your friends got transported to San Nicholas Island. Ten of them died. Thirteen of your very best friends ran away. Thirty-one gone. The 14 that are still alive you can't be with because you're up in sea otter heaven. Wouldn't you feel bad. That's exactly what's happening to the sea otters.
NEWS
August 25, 1987 | IMBERT MATTHEE, Times Staff Writer
In an effort to protect them from potential oil spills along the California coast, federal and state wildlife biologists on Monday captured the first 15 sea otters to be moved to San Nicholas Island, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service officials said. The first sea otter was caught at 9:08 a.m., 20 minutes after the search was launched several miles off the northwest shores of San Luis Obispo County. By 4:30 p.m., biologists of the U.S.
NEWS
July 8, 1987 | LARRY B. STAMMER, Times Staff Writer
The California Coastal Commission on Tuesday approved a controversial plan to establish on San Nicholas Island a new colony for the threatened California sea otter. The 7-5 vote came over the objections of abalone fishermen, who said the otters' voracious appetite would reduce their catch, but it was supported by environmentalists. The commission's approval represented one of the last hurdles before the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service hopes to put its plan into effect in August.
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