Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSan Nicholas Island Ca
IN THE NEWS

San Nicholas Island Ca

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 2001 | Cecilia Rasmussen
The world knows of Ishi, ballyhooed as "the last wild California Indian" and the last of his Yahi tribe, who stumbled out of the wilderness into the gold mining town of Oroville in 1911. But more than 50 years earlier, another sole survivor, the "Lone Woman" whom the priests named Juana Maria, was taken from the only home she had ever known and where she lived alone for 18 years--San Nicolas Island.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 2001 | Cecilia Rasmussen
The world knows of Ishi, ballyhooed as "the last wild California Indian" and the last of his Yahi tribe, who stumbled out of the wilderness into the gold mining town of Oroville in 1911. But more than 50 years earlier, another sole survivor, the "Lone Woman" whom the priests named Juana Maria, was taken from the only home she had ever known and where she lived alone for 18 years--San Nicolas Island.
Advertisement
NEWS
December 30, 1994 | KENNETH R. WEISS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pounding surf and buffeting winds slowly chip away the sandstone walls of a cave on San Nicolas Island, erasing the only rock art left by a tribe of mysterious ancient islanders. Many of the whales or fish icons chiseled into the stone are no longer visible. The black painted pictographs can barely be distinguished from the blue-green algae that cling to the crumbling surface. Archeologists want to protect the artwork from further deterioration at the remote site they call Cave of the Whales.
NEWS
December 30, 1994 | KENNETH R. WEISS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pounding surf and buffeting winds slowly chip away the sandstone walls of a cave on San Nicolas Island, erasing the only rock art left by a tribe of mysterious ancient islanders. Many of the whales or fish icons chiseled into the stone are no longer visible. The black painted pictographs can barely be distinguished from the blue-green algae that cling to the crumbling surface. Archeologists want to protect the artwork from further deterioration at the remote site they call Cave of the Whales.
NEWS
August 4, 1990 | JOANNA M. MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An effort to establish a spinoff colony of California sea otters at San Nicolas Island 60 miles off the coast of Ventura has failed, the California Fish and Game Commission ruled Friday. No more sea otters may be captured and moved to the remote island, the commission ruled over the objections of federal wildlife biologists. The ruling Friday set the stage for a possible dispute with the U.S.
NEWS
April 7, 1994 | J.E. MITCHELL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Navy is seeking permission from the California Coastal Commission to test-fire a sophisticated Gatling gun on San Nicolas Island near areas teeming with seals, sea lions and marine birds. The proposal comes just weeks after the Navy incurred the wrath of environmental activists with a plan to detonate underwater explosives to test the strength of ship hulls 20 miles away. That testing, which has been temporarily delayed, is expected to kill or injure a small number of marine mammals.
NEWS
August 20, 1991 | JOANNA M. MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a major break with a plan to create a spinoff colony of threatened California sea otters, federal wildlife officials have stopped moving animals to San Nicolas Island, and may capture and remove those already there. Only 14 adults remain of the 139 otters that were moved to the island 60 miles off the Ventura County coast, according to a report on the four-year program issued by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service this month.
NEWS
July 8, 1987 | LARRY B. STAMMER, Times Staff Writer
The California Coastal Commission on Tuesday approved a controversial plan to establish on San Nicholas Island a new colony for the threatened California sea otter. The 7-5 vote came over the objections of abalone fishermen, who said the otters' voracious appetite would reduce their catch, but it was supported by environmentalists. The commission's approval represented one of the last hurdles before the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service hopes to put its plan into effect in August.
NEWS
April 7, 1994 | J.E. MITCHELL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Navy is seeking permission from the California Coastal Commission to test-fire a sophisticated Gatling gun on San Nicolas Island near areas teeming with seals, sea lions and marine birds. The proposal comes just weeks after the Navy incurred the wrath of environmental activists with a plan to detonate underwater explosives to test the strength of ship hulls 20 miles away. That testing, which has been temporarily delayed, is expected to kill or injure a small number of marine mammals.
NEWS
August 20, 1991 | JOANNA M. MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a major break with a plan to create a spinoff colony of threatened California sea otters, federal wildlife officials have stopped moving animals to San Nicolas Island, and may capture and remove those already there. Only 14 adults remain of the 139 otters that were moved to the island 60 miles off the Ventura County coast, according to a report on the four-year program issued by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service this month.
NEWS
August 4, 1990 | JOANNA M. MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An effort to establish a spinoff colony of California sea otters at San Nicolas Island 60 miles off the coast of Ventura has failed, the California Fish and Game Commission ruled Friday. No more sea otters may be captured and moved to the remote island, the commission ruled over the objections of federal wildlife biologists. The ruling Friday set the stage for a possible dispute with the U.S.
NEWS
July 8, 1987 | LARRY B. STAMMER, Times Staff Writer
The California Coastal Commission on Tuesday approved a controversial plan to establish on San Nicholas Island a new colony for the threatened California sea otter. The 7-5 vote came over the objections of abalone fishermen, who said the otters' voracious appetite would reduce their catch, but it was supported by environmentalists. The commission's approval represented one of the last hurdles before the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service hopes to put its plan into effect in August.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|