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January 30, 1996 | KENNETH R. WEISS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A jumble of airplane body parts lies corroding next to huge mounds of contaminated soil. Plastic barrels of toxic waste stand nearby, quarantined behind a fence to protect humans from escaping fumes. This is the "Island of the Blue Dolphins," known to thousands of young readers as the lonely spot where a young Native American girl was left behind to fend for herself. It was also, for years, a Navy dumping ground.
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NEWS
January 30, 1996 | KENNETH R. WEISS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A jumble of airplane body parts lies corroding next to huge mounds of contaminated soil. Plastic barrels of toxic waste stand nearby, quarantined behind a fence to protect humans from escaping fumes. This is the "Island of the Blue Dolphins," known to thousands of young readers as the lonely spot where a young Native American girl was left behind to fend for herself. It was also, for years, a Navy dumping ground.
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NEWS
September 28, 1988 | JESSE KATZ, Times Staff Writer
Despite a dismal first year trying to establish a new sea otter colony on one of the Channel Islands, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service on Tuesday began the second phase of its controversial plan to relocate 250 of the furry animals from the central coast by 1992. Using fishing nets and scuba gear, biologists set out again to capture as many as 70 of the 1,700 otters living from Pismo Beach to Santa Cruz and airlift them to San Nicolas Island, an isolated speck southwest of Los Angeles.
NEWS
September 28, 1988 | JESSE KATZ, Times Staff Writer
Despite a dismal first year trying to establish a new sea otter colony on one of the Channel Islands, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service on Tuesday began the second phase of its controversial plan to relocate 250 of the furry animals from the central coast by 1992. Using fishing nets and scuba gear, biologists set out again to capture as many as 70 of the 1,700 otters living from Pismo Beach to Santa Cruz and airlift them to San Nicolas Island, an isolated speck southwest of Los Angeles.
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