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OPINION
May 6, 2012
Re "San Onofre may never run full bore," May 4 Regarding the $55 million to $65 million cost of returning the San Onofre nuclear power plant to service: How many homes could that money outfit with solar panels? How much energy would that expenditure put into the grid? What tax program benefits could Southern California Edison draw from funding solar installations? What would the return on investment be for such a project? San Onofre's federal license expires in only 10 years.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 2014 | By Dan Weikel
After years of contentious debate, a long-running and sharply criticized plan to extend Orange County's toll road network to the San Diego County line has been shelved. The extension would have added miles to the county's maze of tollways but also would have cut - in the view of some - perilously close to San Onofre State Beach and one of the state's most treasured surf breaks. On Tuesday, officials with the Transportation Corridor Agencies announced they had canceled environmental studies for the massive 241 extension and said they would pursue less-ambitious alternatives.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 13, 2013 | By Abby Sewell
The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission and an environmental group came to vastly different interpretations Monday of a federal review panel's decision Monday on the troubled San Onofre nuclear plant. The plant's owner, Southern California Edison, meanwhile, said it is still trying to figure out what the ruling means. San Onofre has been in the midst of multiple regulatory reviews since a tube in the plant's newly replaced steam generators sprung a leak and released a small amount of radioactive steam in January 2012.
OPINION
March 27, 2014
Re “Going once ...” March 26 Regarding the upcoming auction at the shuttered San Onofre nuclear plant and your line about the “the auction is generating interest”: That is the first thing being generated there since January of 2012. Rick Goward Mission Viejo More letters to the editor ...
OPINION
February 14, 2013
Re "In the dark on San Onofre," Editorial, Feb. 10 It is no surprise that Southern California Edison and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission are keeping safety information about the San Onofre plant secret. One of the main lessons of the Fukushima disaster in Japan was that collusion between the nuclear industry and government regulators can have deadly consequences. The NRC logo states, "Protecting People and the Environment. " But here, the NRC seems interested in protecting Edison and not the 8.4 million people who live within the 50-mile evacuation zone.
BUSINESS
March 13, 2013 | By Michael Hiltzik
Southern California Edison, the majority owner of the nuclear plant on the San Diego County coast, says the answer is no. That's the response of the utility's president, Ronald Litzinger, to my column this week questioning why Edison ratepayers are still forking over $54 million a month in rates for a facility that hasn't generated a watt of electricity in 13 months -- and may never operate again. (When added to what customers of the minority owner, San Diego Gas & Electric, are paying, the monthly total is $68 million.)
BUSINESS
September 23, 2013 | By Marc Lifsher
SACRAMENTO -- Federal regulators have issued proposed safety violation citations to Southern California Edison Co. and its contractor for alleged design flaws in steam generators at the San Onofre nuclear power plant. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission on Monday released the results of an inspection into the failures that led to Edison's decision in June to shutter two units at the electricity generating station near San Clemente. In January of 2012, steam tubes in one of the units began to leak and the complex was shut down.
OPINION
August 31, 2012
Re "PUC dithers as consumers keep paying for San Onofre," Column, Aug. 29 There is no "welfare" in the system governed by the California Public Utilities Commission that oversees the delivery of electricity to 12 million customers in California. Here's how it works: Southern California Edison, an investor-owned utility, is the majority owner of the San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station. As a regulated utility, we receive cost reimbursement and a fair investment return over a long period of time on capital that shareholders and creditors advanced up front, as they did for the steam generators - all as part of the costs required to provide emission-free electricity for 1.4 million homes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 25, 1985
The Unit 1 of the San Onofre nuclear power plant has been shut down for routine inspection and maintenance, according to Southern California Edison Co., operator of the plant. Unit 1, which went into operation in 1968 and is the oldest of the three units at the plant, was shut down Thursday and is expected to return to service by Friday. On Tuesday, Unit 2 automatically shut down when when one of the unit's monitors malfunctioned.
NEWS
June 7, 2013 | By Karin Klein
Southern California Edison made its smartest decision in a long time by announcing that it would retire the San Onofre nuclear plant. As evidence has piled up in the nearly year and a half since both Units 2 and 3 went dark, it has pointed more and more strongly to a scenario under which the utility played things too fast and loose with its two new steam generators, which cost $670 million but quickly showed wear in the vast arrays of tubes that...
BUSINESS
March 27, 2014 | By Marc Lifsher
SACRAMENTO - Electricity customers in Southern California would receive $1.4 billion in refunds on their bills over the next eight years as part of an agreement between two utilities and ratepayer organizations over the closing of the San Onofre nuclear power plant. The proposed settlement, announced Thursday, still needs approval from the California Public Utilities Commission. Both ratepayer advocates and executives at Southern California Edison Co. and San Diego Gas & Electric Co. said they were satisfied with the deal.
BUSINESS
March 21, 2014 | By Marc Lifsher
SACRAMENTO -- Ratepayers of Southern California Edison Co. and San Diego Gas & Electric Co. could be in line for more than $1 billion in refunds as part of a possible financial settlement from the closure of the San Onofre nuclear power plant. Both Edison and another party to the negotiations, the Utility Reform Network (TURN), a consumer advocacy group, confirmed that a settlement conference is scheduled next Thursday at the San Francisco headquarters of the California Public Utilities Commission.
BUSINESS
March 21, 2014 | By Marc Lifsher
SACRAMENTO - Ratepayers of Southern California Edison Co. and San Diego Gas & Electric Co. could be in line for a share of more than $1 billion in refunds as part of a possible financial settlement from the closure of the San Onofre nuclear power plant. Both Edison and another party to the negotiations, the Utility Reform Network (TURN), a consumer advocacy group, confirmed that a settlement conference is scheduled Thursday at the San Francisco headquarters of the California Public Utilities Commission.
OPINION
February 13, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
Two years after the San Onofre nuclear plant was shuttered because of its problematic steam generators, state authorities are deciding how Southern California Edison ought to power the homes and businesses of its customers without the troubled plant, which generated 19% of the company's energy. Finding the right answer is especially important because, for all the dangers of nuclear power, it has the advantage of a low carbon footprint. Natural gas, the easiest replacement, is a fossil fuel that worsens global warming.
BUSINESS
February 13, 2014 | By Marc Lifsher
 Much if not all of the electric power once provided by the San Onofre nuclear power plant could be replaced with energy from non-fossil-fuel sources, says a proposed decision pending at the California Public Utilities Commission. The procurement plan written by an administrative law judge is expected to be debated and possibly voted upon next month by the five-member commission. Two principal partners in the shuttered plant, Southern California Edison Co. and San Diego Gas & Electric Co., would be required to procure at least 600 megawatts of power from so-called preferred resources, which include wind and solar power, energy efficiency programs, electricity storage systems and locally generation from roof-top panels.
BUSINESS
December 30, 2013 | By Marc Lifsher
After coping with the June shutdown of the San Onofre nuclear power plant near San Clemente, the fallout from a fatal 2010 explosion of a natural gas pipeline in the Bay Area and a batch of consumer protection issues, the state's Public Utilities Commission faces more challenges in the year ahead. And on the spot will be PUC President Michael R. Peevey, 75, who has served as California's chief utility regulator under three governors. He will have been the longest-serving head of the agency by the time his term expires at the end of next year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 16, 2013 | By Jason Wells
The San Onofre nuclear plant may be permanently retired, but on Wednesday, the sirens were scheduled to sound as they have every year for an annual test. The test -- a regulatory requirement that hasn't been suspended despite the nuclear plant's shutdown -- will involve 50 sirens and include the cities of Dana Point, San Clemente and San Juan Capistrano, as well as other areas of southern Orange County, nearby state parks and the Marine Corps base Camp Pendleton, officials announced.
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