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San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 18, 1992 | GREG JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As many as 500 jobs at the San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station will be cut beginning late next year if the state approves plans to close the plant's aging Unit 1, Southern California Edison Corp. officials said Friday.
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BUSINESS
November 2, 2012 | By Ronald D. White, Los Angeles Times
Edison International saw its third-quarter profit fall 55% because of lower energy prices and higher utility costs. The Rosemeadcompany also blamed a delayed decision on rate increases by California regulators. Edison, which owns the Southern California Edison utility, was also hit hard by costs associated with inspections and repairs to its San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station. The utility's two nuclear reactors were closed after problems were discovered in steam generators, and they haven't produced electricity since January.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 26, 1999 | DAVID HALDANE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When federal regulators begin an exhaustive three-day inspection Wednesday at San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station, their task will be to determine whether one of the nation's most powerful nuclear plants is safe. But the all-out, all-systems testing, done every six years, takes on greater significance amid concerns about Y2K and whether Southern California's only nuclear generating plant is up for the challenge.
NEWS
July 7, 1986
A suit filed in Santa Ana by the cities of Riverside and Anaheim against Southern California Edison Co. charges that cost overruns and construction delays at the San Onofre nuclear generating station cost them $41 million. Through a 1977 agreement, the cities participated in construction of the plant. Edison spokesmen declined comment until company officials have read the suit.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 16, 1987
Southern California Edison Co. will test its network of community alert sirens surrounding the San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station today. The sirens will be sounded twice between 10 a.m. and noon, for two to five minutes each. The 50 community alert sirens are located near the plant, including San Onofre State Park and Camp Pendleton, as well as in the nearby cities of San Clemente, San Juan Capistrano, Capistrano Beach and Dana Point.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 25, 1991
A system of 52 sirens near the San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station, designed to alert residents in the event of a nuclear or other emergency, will be tested today, Southern California Edison announced. The sirens will be sounded twice, for two to five minutes, from 10 a.m. to noon. The sirens are in San Onofre State Park, Camp Pendleton, San Clemente, San Juan Capistrano and Dana Point.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 26, 1999
Managers at the San Onofre nuclear plant say they have action plans for four levels of emergency, all of which will be simulated during this week's inspection: 1. An unusual event. This can be triggered by almost anything unexpected. The plant has had several, including one caused by a minor power failure. In each case, one of the plant's special yellow telephones is used to notify key civilian authorities, who monitor the situation to its conclusion. 2. An alert.
BUSINESS
March 10, 1998 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The planned merger of the parents of Southern California Gas and San Diego Gas & Electric cleared a major hurdle Monday with the approval of the U.S. Justice Department. The government's blessing was conditioned on the already announced plans by Enova Corp. of San Diego and Pacific Enterprises of Los Angeles to sell fossil-fuel power plants at Carlsbad and Chula Vista that are owned by San Diego Gas & Electric. SDG&E is also selling its 20% interest in the San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 13, 1996 | DEBRA CANO
The City Council this week approved the sale of $100 million in bonds to refinance debt issued in 1986 to pay for Anaheim's interest in San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station. What this means for customers of the city-owned utilities is stable electricity rates for the next several years and lower rates beginning by the year 2003, city officials said. Michael Bell, the assistant general manager for the Public Utilities Department, said that the city holds a 3.
BUSINESS
January 8, 1996 | Times Staff Reports
Nuclear Family: The ultimate cost that ratepayers may bear for building and operating the San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station is scheduled to be taken up--after several postponements--by the California Public Utilities Commission when it convenes in San Francisco on Wednesday. At issue is a settlement among the two utilities that built the plant near San Clemente--Southern California Edison Co. and San Diego Gas & Electric Co.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 21, 1994
Inside the Nuclear Reactor The heart of San Onofre is its nuclear reactor. It can produce vast amounts of energy from a small amount of fuel. How it's done: 1. Uranium atoms split (fission) inside fuel rods; occurs trillions of times per second, creating heat. 2. Water circulating inside reactor core is heated to more than 600 degrees Fahrenheit. 3. Hot water passes through pipes into boiler and is converted to steam. Remaining water is pumped back to reactor to be reheated; cycle repeats.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 26, 1993 | GREG HERNANDEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A warning siren at a nuclear power plant accidentally went off early Sunday morning, scaring hundreds of residents who flooded the sheriff's substation switchboard with calls. "We had about 400 calls in about an hour," said Sheriff's Sgt. Paul Falk. "The dispatchers were definitely busy." The air-raid-type siren, one of 52 located within 12 miles of the San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station, sounded at 1:12 a.m.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 13, 1996 | DEBRA CANO
The City Council this week approved the sale of $100 million in bonds to refinance debt issued in 1986 to pay for Anaheim's interest in San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station. What this means for customers of the city-owned utilities is stable electricity rates for the next several years and lower rates beginning by the year 2003, city officials said. Michael Bell, the assistant general manager for the Public Utilities Department, said that the city holds a 3.
BUSINESS
January 8, 1996 | Times Staff Reports
Nuclear Family: The ultimate cost that ratepayers may bear for building and operating the San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station is scheduled to be taken up--after several postponements--by the California Public Utilities Commission when it convenes in San Francisco on Wednesday. At issue is a settlement among the two utilities that built the plant near San Clemente--Southern California Edison Co. and San Diego Gas & Electric Co.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 13, 1992 | TOM GORMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
California's oldest commercial nuclear generator--the landmark concrete cylinder at San Onofre's beachside--will shut down permanently late this year in the face of diminished efficiency and uncertain costs of keeping the 23-year-old plant operating. But, even as the oldest of the three nuclear power units near San Clemente goes dark as it depletes its last fill-up of uranium fuel, Southern California ratepayers will still absorb its costs for another four years.
NEWS
August 13, 1992 | TOM GORMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
California's oldest commercial nuclear generator--the landmark Unit 1 concrete cylinder at San Onofre's beachside--will shut down permanently late this year in the face of diminished efficiency and uncertain costs to keep the 23-year-old plant operating. But even as the oldest of the three nuclear power plants near San Clemente goes dark as it depletes its last fill-up of uranium fuel, Southern California ratepayers will still absorb its costs for another four years.
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