Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSan Onofre Nuclear Power Plants
IN THE NEWS

San Onofre Nuclear Power Plants

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
July 19, 1988
Recent equipment purchases at the San Onofre nuclear power plant are being reviewed to determine if the plant was among the U.S. nuclear plants that may have bought used circuit breakers labeled as new, a spokesman for Southern California Edison Co., majority owner of the plant, said. "We are now going through all of our records attempting to determine where our breakers were purchased," Dave Barron said. "It's a day-to-day review, and we have not yet determined anything."
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
March 27, 2014 | By Marc Lifsher
SACRAMENTO - Electricity customers in Southern California would receive $1.4 billion in refunds on their bills over the next eight years as part of an agreement between two utilities and ratepayer organizations over the closing of the San Onofre nuclear power plant. The proposed settlement, announced Thursday, still needs approval from the California Public Utilities Commission. Both ratepayer advocates and executives at Southern California Edison Co. and San Diego Gas & Electric Co. said they were satisfied with the deal.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 28, 2009 | Susannah Rosenblatt
The first of four new steam generators needed to keep the San Onofre nuclear power plant in operation is making its way -- slowly and carefully -- to the facility in northern San Diego County by ship, barge and a tractor-trailer-like vehicle with 256 wheels. The 650-ton pieces of equipment are intended to extend the life span of the power plant, which has come under scrutiny from regulators in the last year because of safety lapses.
BUSINESS
November 24, 2013 | By Marc Lifsher
SACRAMENTO - Southern California electricity ratepayers soon could get the first of possibly many refunds, stemming from the shutdown of the San Onofre nuclear power plant. Two state Public Utilities Commission administrative law judges last week issued a proposed decision, ordering Southern California Edison Co. to refund $74.2 million on its customers' 2012 bills and San Diego Gas & Electric Co. to refund $19.3 million. The reason: Edison closed the San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station in January and not all its reported spending was reasonable or necessary, the judges wrote.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 28, 2012 | By Abby Sewell, Los Angeles Times
The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, citing serious concerns about equipment failures at the San Onofre nuclear power plant, has prohibited Southern California Edison from restarting the plant until the problems are thoroughly understood and fixed. The plant has been shut down for two months, the longest in San Onofre's history, after a tube leak in one of the plant's steam generators released a small amount of radioactive steam. Since then, unusual wear has been found on hundreds of tubes that carry radioactive water.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 5, 2012 | By Esmeralda Bermudez, Los Angeles Times
The San Onofre nuclear power plant came under renewed scrutiny last week after a small radiation leak and the discovery of extensive tube damage. The leak and the tube wear "at no point posed a danger to the community or to workers on site," said Jennifer Manfre, spokeswoman with Southern California Edison, which operates the facility. But the incidents raised concern among environmental groups, which for years have kept a close eye on the plant near San Clemente following other safety problems.
NEWS
February 12, 1985 | Associated Press
The Nuclear Regulatory Commission today rejected an appeal to shut down one of three reactors at the San Onofre nuclear plant and voted again to deny its opponents a new hearing on allowing the unit to operate. On a 4-1 vote, the commission denied a petition by the Sierra Club and the Southern California Alliance for Survival for the shutdown order and a hearing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 13, 1991 | JOHN PENNER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Southern California Edison executives Friday outlined plans to implement a series of state recommendations to mitigate the killing of tons of fish and kelp at the firm's San Onofre nuclear power plant.
OPINION
April 13, 2012 | By David Ropeik
California's initiative process can be both a wonderfully democratic and perilously dumb way to make law. On no issue could that be more true than the proposed initiative to shut down nuclear power in the state. The initiative would shut down the Diablo Canyon and San Onofre nuclear plants until the federal government approves a permanent disposal site for nuclear waste. The issue is scientifically, environmentally and economically complex, and tangled with powerful emotions. Between the facts and those feelings, guess which will have more influence on the choice people make?
BUSINESS
November 24, 2013 | By Marc Lifsher
SACRAMENTO - Southern California electricity ratepayers soon could get the first of possibly many refunds, stemming from the shutdown of the San Onofre nuclear power plant. Two state Public Utilities Commission administrative law judges last week issued a proposed decision, ordering Southern California Edison Co. to refund $74.2 million on its customers' 2012 bills and San Diego Gas & Electric Co. to refund $19.3 million. The reason: Edison closed the San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station in January and not all its reported spending was reasonable or necessary, the judges wrote.
OPINION
April 13, 2012 | By David Ropeik
California's initiative process can be both a wonderfully democratic and perilously dumb way to make law. On no issue could that be more true than the proposed initiative to shut down nuclear power in the state. The initiative would shut down the Diablo Canyon and San Onofre nuclear plants until the federal government approves a permanent disposal site for nuclear waste. The issue is scientifically, environmentally and economically complex, and tangled with powerful emotions. Between the facts and those feelings, guess which will have more influence on the choice people make?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 28, 2012 | By Abby Sewell, Los Angeles Times
The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, citing serious concerns about equipment failures at the San Onofre nuclear power plant, has prohibited Southern California Edison from restarting the plant until the problems are thoroughly understood and fixed. The plant has been shut down for two months, the longest in San Onofre's history, after a tube leak in one of the plant's steam generators released a small amount of radioactive steam. Since then, unusual wear has been found on hundreds of tubes that carry radioactive water.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 5, 2012 | By Esmeralda Bermudez, Los Angeles Times
The San Onofre nuclear power plant came under renewed scrutiny last week after a small radiation leak and the discovery of extensive tube damage. The leak and the tube wear "at no point posed a danger to the community or to workers on site," said Jennifer Manfre, spokeswoman with Southern California Edison, which operates the facility. But the incidents raised concern among environmental groups, which for years have kept a close eye on the plant near San Clemente following other safety problems.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 28, 2009 | Susannah Rosenblatt
The first of four new steam generators needed to keep the San Onofre nuclear power plant in operation is making its way -- slowly and carefully -- to the facility in northern San Diego County by ship, barge and a tractor-trailer-like vehicle with 256 wheels. The 650-ton pieces of equipment are intended to extend the life span of the power plant, which has come under scrutiny from regulators in the last year because of safety lapses.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 13, 1991 | JOHN PENNER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Southern California Edison executives Friday outlined plans to implement a series of state recommendations to mitigate the killing of tons of fish and kelp at the firm's San Onofre nuclear power plant.
NEWS
July 19, 1988
Recent equipment purchases at the San Onofre nuclear power plant are being reviewed to determine if the plant was among the U.S. nuclear plants that may have bought used circuit breakers labeled as new, a spokesman for Southern California Edison Co., majority owner of the plant, said. "We are now going through all of our records attempting to determine where our breakers were purchased," Dave Barron said. "It's a day-to-day review, and we have not yet determined anything."
BUSINESS
March 27, 2014 | By Marc Lifsher
SACRAMENTO - Electricity customers in Southern California would receive $1.4 billion in refunds on their bills over the next eight years as part of an agreement between two utilities and ratepayer organizations over the closing of the San Onofre nuclear power plant. The proposed settlement, announced Thursday, still needs approval from the California Public Utilities Commission. Both ratepayer advocates and executives at Southern California Edison Co. and San Diego Gas & Electric Co. said they were satisfied with the deal.
NEWS
February 12, 1985 | Associated Press
The Nuclear Regulatory Commission today rejected an appeal to shut down one of three reactors at the San Onofre nuclear plant and voted again to deny its opponents a new hearing on allowing the unit to operate. On a 4-1 vote, the commission denied a petition by the Sierra Club and the Southern California Alliance for Survival for the shutdown order and a hearing.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|