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San Pedro River

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NEWS
October 15, 1987 | From Reuters
At least 20 people were killed and an unknown number were left homeless when heavy rains swelled the San Pedro River in western Venezuela on Wednesday, sweeping away houses along its banks, firefighters and local officials said.
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NATIONAL
September 25, 2003 | Julie Cart, Times Staff Writer
The San Pedro River, one of the last free-flowing rivers in the Southwest and an oasis for hundreds of species of migratory birds, could be seriously depleted if Congress agrees to exempt a nearby military installation from water restrictions. Pushing for the exemption at Ft. Huachuca is Rep. Rick Renzi (R-Ariz.), whose father is an executive at a firm with contracts worth more than $450 million at the post.
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NATIONAL
September 25, 2003 | Julie Cart, Times Staff Writer
The San Pedro River, one of the last free-flowing rivers in the Southwest and an oasis for hundreds of species of migratory birds, could be seriously depleted if Congress agrees to exempt a nearby military installation from water restrictions. Pushing for the exemption at Ft. Huachuca is Rep. Rick Renzi (R-Ariz.), whose father is an executive at a firm with contracts worth more than $450 million at the post.
NEWS
October 15, 1987 | From Reuters
At least 20 people were killed and an unknown number were left homeless when heavy rains swelled the San Pedro River in western Venezuela on Wednesday, sweeping away houses along its banks, firefighters and local officials said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 2, 1986 | United Press International
Three men apparently sleeping under a blanket on railroad tracks in southern Arizona were killed when a train engineer spotted them too late to stop, authorities said. The accident Thursday occurred on Southern Pacific Railroad track along the San Pedro River.
TRAVEL
May 27, 2001
Ellen Clark's Weekend Escape on Ramsey Canyon ("Arizona's Nature Nurtured," May 6) brought back wonderful memories. Last October I spent five days in that bit of riparian paradise. There are beautiful hikes within the preserve, and if you are lucky enough to have Mark Pretti, the resident naturalist, lead the hike, you will hear sounds and see things that you would otherwise miss. Close by, the San Pedro River is another wonderful area to explore. MAUREEN GILCHRIST Van Nuys
NEWS
October 17, 2007 | Ruben Martinez, Ruben Martinez, author of "Crossing Over: A Mexican Family on the Migrant Trail," is a professor of English at Loyola Marymount University.
I stood on the cottonwood-lined banks of the San Pedro River in Arizona recently and watched it flow freely under a "water gap" fence -- two strands of barbed wire and two of wound cable. Those four strands, which mark the line between Mexico and the United States of America at the edge of the San Pedro Riparian National Conservation Area, are a modest boundary to be sure, as most of the border has been since 1848. Soon, this border will get a much more powerful and disturbing representation.
NEWS
November 7, 1993 | RITA BEAMISH, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Clinton Administration on Friday urged government whistle-blowers to tell the truth about environmental problems in federal agencies, but also to work cooperatively. Employees who gathered at a two-day convention to share stories of retribution and federal wrongdoing heard from four high-level Clinton Administration officials, including Energy Secretary Hazel O'Leary.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 2000
Chock full of diverse wildlife, scenic Ramsey Canyon sits at the juncture of the Chihuahuan and Sonoran deserts and where the Sierra Madre and the Rocky Mountains end. The Nature Conservancy spent a year and $800,000 to restore the scenic canyon's habitat. Now visitors once again will be able to marvel at the splendors of the mile-high "sky island" canyon--what state director Les Corey calls one of the national environmental organization's "flagship preserves."
NEWS
July 24, 1988 | Associated Press
The early days of this once-bustling community 10 miles north of the Mexican border could have been a movie script: Rancher builds dam that deprives neighbor of water. Irate neighbor dynamites dam. Rancher's daughter is drowned. Rancher confronts neighbor on the streets of Tombstone and shoots him dead. But it really happened, according to newspaper and historic accounts. The rancher was Col. William C. Greene, who along with thousands of cattle constituted Hereford's claim to fame.
NEWS
May 26, 1996 | CHRISTENA COLCLOUGH, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Santos Chata peers some 60 feet above to the canopy of the rain forest, where a pair of scarlet macaws preen each other and take a break from feeding two chicks in the hollow of a silver-barked cantemo tree. Alert to company below, the pair began a raucous symphony of squawking and flapping of brilliant scarlet-colored wings, three feet from tip to tip. Chata is a keeper at El Peru National Park in the 4-million-acre Maya Biosphere Reserve in the Peten region of northern Guatemala.
NEWS
December 1, 1992 | MICHAEL HAEDERLE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
On April 13, 1989, Douglas Preston mounted a horse named King on the banks of a river in an isolated corner of southeastern Arizona and set out on a 1,000-mile odyssey to trace the footsteps of a 16th-Century Spanish conquistador. For Preston, a writer who recently moved from New York to the Southwest, the thought of riding horses over rugged mountains and vast deserts was a romantic one. What could be better than sleeping under the stars and listening to the coyotes howl?
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