Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSan Quentin
IN THE NEWS

San Quentin

FEATURED ARTICLES
OPINION
June 1, 2009
San Francisco was a rough-and-tumble Gold Rush boomtown in 1852, when authorities decided they needed more secure facilities to house troublemakers than the prison ships docked in the bay. So they built a prison at Point San Quentin, an out-of-the way peninsula north of the city.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 2014 | By Samantha Schaefer
“Gold fever” is still alive, a California historian said after last week's discovery of more than 1,400 coins buried on a Northern California couple's gold country property. The historic find, believed to be the most valuable in North America, has had people around the world buzzing since the announcement by numismatic firm Kagin's Inc., which evaluated the hoard and is representing the couple. “There's something about gold, ever since the days of legendary King Midas, it's just incredible people's response to this,” said Gary Kurutz, director of special collections at the California State Library.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
December 27, 2013 | By Jessica Guynn
SAN FRANCISCO -- How do new inmates cope with the lack of privacy in prison? What advice would an inmate give someone facing a long prison sentence? What are the effects of incarceration on inmates' families? All good questions, none of which had good answers online -- until recently. Through a partnership with the Last Mile, a high-tech incubator at San Quentin , question-and-answer service Quora has made it possible for inmates to make their voices heard on social media.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 2014 | By Samantha Schaefer
The news of a Northern California couple's discovery of more than 1,400 gold coins hidden on their property has experts, history buffs and regular folks speculating on the treasure's origin. Though officials said it is unlikely the coins were stolen in a turn-of-the-century theft at the U.S. Mint in San Francisco, some wonder if the cache could be one of many believed buried by the  Knights of the Golden Circle . The secretive, subversive Confederate group is thought to have hidden millions in ill-gotten gold across a dozen states to finance a second Civil War. PHOTOS: California couple discovers cache of gold coins The coins very well could be a fortune buried by a wealthy businessman, but the time period, markers near the cache and manner in which the coins were buried fit the mold of the KGC, said Warren Getler, a former Wall Street Journal reporter who coauthored “Rebel Gold,” a book about the group.
NEWS
March 18, 1990 | MILES CORWIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The small residential community of clapboard houses and condominiums flanks a narrow street that dead-ends right at the swinging iron gates of San Quentin Prison. Most residents of San Quentin Village don't mind living in the shadow of the prison because it is one of the few spots left in the Bay Area with waterfront property at affordable prices. Security at the prison is excellent, residents say, and they rarely worry about having 5,000 assorted rapists, murderers and burglars as neighbors.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 15, 1989 | RICHARD LEE COLVIN
A state bureaucrat quoted in a recent news story used the phrase "community of alleged violators" to refer to unscrupulous real estate developers bent on ignoring building restrictions in the Santa Monica Mountains. That phrase caught my eye because it seemed to take the now-common disregard for the true meaning of the term community to new lengths. Are San Quentin inmates a "community of thugs"? Are Ivan Boesky and his ilk members of "the community of convicted insider traders"?
NEWS
January 26, 1987 | Associated Press
A prison inmate was listed in critical condition Sunday after being stabbed in the San Quentin exercise yard, a prison spokesman said. The inmate, a 37-year-old from Ventura County, received a single puncture wound to the neck at 12:23 p.m. in the exercise yard of one of the prison's segregated housing sections, said the spokesman, Lt. Dave Langerman. The inmate was taken to a hospital outside San Quentin for treatment, Langerman said.
NEWS
June 14, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
After discovering a dozen "inmate-manufactured" stabbing weapons in a routine search, San Quentin state prison officials ordered a lock-down Wednesday in anticipation of a possible conflict between rival street factions or ethnic groups among the prisoners. Guards found the weapons--ranging in size from half-inch wide to ice-pick-shaped devices up to 11 inches long--in a search of a lower exercise yard.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 4, 2007 | Jenifer Warren, Times Staff Writer
San Quentin State Prison was closed indefinitely to new inmates and visitors Wednesday as officials fought to contain a raging gastroenteritis outbreak among roughly 500 convicts and staff members. The virus, which was first detected Dec. 28, has spread to all of the Marin County prison's housing units except a relatively isolated one with 15 inmates. On death row, about one-fourth of the prison's 620 condemned men have become sick, officials said.
NEWS
February 2, 1986 | STEVE BREWER, Associated Press
San Quentin has a well-known and largely well-deserved reputation as California's deadliest prison, but corrections officials are trying to change all that. "We house the toughest inmates in the state, maybe some of the toughest in the country," said Sgt. Dave Langerman, administrative assistant to the warden. "This is a population of troublemakers, to some degree."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 2014 | By Samantha Schaefer, This post has been corrected. Please see details below.
Gold coins worth $10 million that were discovered by a Northern California couple were not likely stolen in a 1901 U.S. Mint theft in San Francisco, an official said Tuesday. “We do not have any information linking the Saddle Ridge Hoard coins to any thefts at any United States Mint facility,” U.S. Mint spokesman Adam Stump said in a statement, adding that lawyers have looked into the matter. In 1901, six bags of double eagle gold coins -- 250 $20 coins in each -- went missing from the San Francisco Mint.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 7, 2014 | By Chris Megerian
SACRAMENTO -- The San Quentin News, the inmate-run newspaper at one of California's most notorious lockups, is being honored by a journalism association at the same time its operations have been suspended by prison officials. The Northern California chapter of the Society of Professional Journalists is recognizing the newspaper, one of the few of its kind in the country, with a freedom of information award for "accomplishing extraordinary journalism under extraordinary circumstances" and lifting "the curtain of secrecy that shrouds those who live behind the walls.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 2014 | By a Times staff writer
A Napa mother and her boyfriend accused of beating the woman's 3-year-old daughter to death did not enter pleas in court Tuesday after being charged with murder. Sara Krueger, 23, and Ryan Scott Warner, 26, were ordered to return to court Feb. 25 after Judge Michael Williams appointed lawyers to represent them, the San Francisco Chronicle reported. They were being held without bail in the death of Kayleigh Slusher . They admitted  to police that they hid the girl's body in a suitcase inside a freezer for three days, according to court documents released Tuesday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 1, 2014 | By Chris Megerian
SAN QUENTIN - The scene was almost indistinguishable from that in any other newsroom. Editors sat around chatting about the next issue and tinkering with stories. Front pages were tacked up on the walls, and family photos were taped to computer terminals. But in fact this newspaper office was unlike almost any other, obvious from the dress code: Staff members wore the standard blue uniform of California prison inmates. When the phone rang, the answer was a crisp, "Hello, San Quentin News.
BUSINESS
December 27, 2013 | By Jessica Guynn
SAN FRANCISCO -- How do new inmates cope with the lack of privacy in prison? What advice would an inmate give someone facing a long prison sentence? What are the effects of incarceration on inmates' families? All good questions, none of which had good answers online -- until recently. Through a partnership with the Last Mile, a high-tech incubator at San Quentin , question-and-answer service Quora has made it possible for inmates to make their voices heard on social media.
BUSINESS
December 27, 2013 | By Jessica Guynn
SAN QUENTIN - North of Silicon Valley on a rocky promontory overlooking San Francisco Bay stands California's oldest prison. Inmates here are cut off from the innovation the nearby high-tech industry produces. They are not permitted on the Internet, and most have never touched a smartphone or a tablet. But two technology veterans - Chris Redlitz and Beverly Parenti - are bringing the promise of Silicon Valley to San Quentin State Prison by creating a high-tech incubator here called the Last Mile.
NEWS
April 21, 1992 | BOB BAKER and PAUL FELDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
"The answer, my friend, is blowing in the wind . . . " sang 150 suddenly hopeful opponents of the death penalty as the sun set on San Quentin prison and a surprise legal ruling appeared to temporarily spare Robert Alton Harris. All this was too much for Claudette Baumgardner, who had come to wait for Harris to die, and to celebrate when he did. "The answer is the gas chamber!" she bellowed over the soft, impassioned singing of the death penalty opponents standing 20 feet away.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 16, 2013 | By Paige St. John
SACRAMENTO - Testimony continued Wednesday in a federal court case on California's treatment of mentally ill prisoners. Dr. Pablo Stewart, a psychiatrist, testified about the care that California's condemned prisoners receive, telling of a psychotic inmate who tried to kill himself three times - even punching pens through his eyes. The man was kept on death row rather than hospitalized, Stewart said, because he signed an agreement to take his drugs and attend therapy sessions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 17, 2013 | By Richard Winton
Richard Ramirez - the infamous  serial killer  who died while on San Quentin's death row after being convicted of 13 murders - died of complications of blood cancer. Ramirez, died June 7 at 9:10 a.m. while receiving treatment at Marin General Hospital in Greenbrae, Calif. The Marin County coroner's office said Ramirez, one of the nation's most infamous serial killers, died of complications related to B-cell lymphoma In addition, at the time of his death Ramirez had other significant conditions, including "chronic substance abuse and chronic hepatitis C viral infection.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|