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San Simeon Ca Development And Redevelopment

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NEWS
January 20, 1998 | FRANK CLIFFORD and LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Subject to a will that threatens rebellious heirs with disinheritance, descendants of William Randolph Hearst are just now daring to break a long silence over the management of their legendary holdings. The impetus for speaking out is the controversy over a proposed commercial development on the 77,000-acre Hearst ranch at San Simeon. The rare public disagreements have brought into view an underlying division between at least some members of the famous family and its hired managers.
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NEWS
June 6, 2001 | KENNETH R. WEISS and MARGARET TALEV, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Former Interior Secretary Bruce Babbitt, in his first prominent role since leaving government, is helping the Hearst Corp. broker a deal worth $200 million or more that will determine the fate of Hearst's fabled seaside ranch at San Simeon. Babbitt also has been hired by a developer hoping to jump-start stalled plans to build a mini-city of 3,050 homes on Ahmanson Ranch in rural Ventura County, just northwest of Calabasas.
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NEWS
February 16, 2001 | SALLY ANN CONNELL and JOHN JOHNSON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Hearst Corp. formally unveiled its new, more conciliatory plan Thursday to build a long-stalled resort along a windswept stretch of the Central Coast--a plan that immediately drew a familiar chorus of skepticism. "The Hearst project is really unchanged from what it has always been," said Doug Buckmaster, a spokesman for Friends of the Ranchland. "What's changed is the tack they are taking. It's smoother."
NEWS
February 16, 2001 | SALLY ANN CONNELL and JOHN JOHNSON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Hearst Corp. formally unveiled its new, more conciliatory plan Thursday to build a long-stalled resort along a windswept stretch of the Central Coast--a plan that immediately drew a familiar chorus of skepticism. "The Hearst project is really unchanged from what it has always been," said Doug Buckmaster, a spokesman for Friends of the Ranchland. "What's changed is the tack they are taking. It's smoother."
NEWS
June 30, 1996 | FRANK CLIFFORD, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
For the better part of a century, the mountains and coastal moors that William Randolph Hearst regarded as the most beautiful countryside on earth has remained almost as wild and empty as when he first saw them. Along with neighboring Big Sur, this is one of those epic stretches of sculpted rock, roiling sea and teeming wildlife that makes the California coast one of nature's grand stage sets. Yet this land is also private property.
NEWS
June 6, 2001 | KENNETH R. WEISS and MARGARET TALEV, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Former Interior Secretary Bruce Babbitt, in his first prominent role since leaving government, is helping the Hearst Corp. broker a deal worth $200 million or more that will determine the fate of Hearst's fabled seaside ranch at San Simeon. Babbitt also has been hired by a developer hoping to jump-start stalled plans to build a mini-city of 3,050 homes on Ahmanson Ranch in rural Ventura County, just northwest of Calabasas.
NEWS
January 20, 1998 | FRANK CLIFFORD and LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Subject to a will that threatens rebellious heirs with disinheritance, descendants of William Randolph Hearst are just now daring to break a long silence over the management of their legendary holdings. The impetus for speaking out is the controversy over a proposed commercial development on the 77,000-acre Hearst ranch at San Simeon. The rare public disagreements have brought into view an underlying division between at least some members of the famous family and its hired managers.
NEWS
June 30, 1996 | FRANK CLIFFORD, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
For the better part of a century, the mountains and coastal moors that William Randolph Hearst regarded as the most beautiful countryside on earth has remained almost as wild and empty as when he first saw them. Along with neighboring Big Sur, this is one of those epic stretches of sculpted rock, roiling sea and teeming wildlife that makes the California coast one of nature's grand stage sets. Yet this land is also private property.
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