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Sanctions On Iran

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WORLD
February 6, 2013 | By Paul Richter
WASHINGTON -- The Obama administration slapped new sanctions on Iran's state broadcasting agency and Internet-policing agencies Wednesday as economic sanctions enacted last summer also took effect. The actions are part of an effort to force the Iranian government to curb its nuclear program, which the United States and many other nations believe is designed to develop nuclear weapons capability. Iran maintains it is enriching uranium for peaceful purposes only. The newest sanctions, announced by the Treasury Department, are aimed at Iranian agencies and companies that stifle dissent and impede the free flow of information.
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WORLD
December 12, 2013 | By Shashank Bengali
WASHINGTON - The Obama administration added 17 foreign companies and individuals to a federal blacklist Thursday for allegedly helping Iran evade economic sanctions, a move intended both to maintain pressure on Tehran during upcoming nuclear negotiations and to persuade skeptics in Congress that no more sanctions are needed. The State and Treasury departments announced the joint action shortly before Wendy Sherman, the chief U.S. diplomat at nuclear talks with Iran, appeared on Capitol Hill and vowed to "vigorously enforce" existing sanctions.
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WORLD
June 3, 2013 | By Shashank Bengali, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON - President Obama announced new economic sanctions on Iran on Monday in a bid to raise pressure on conservative hard-liners who have vowed not to compromise with the West over Tehran's nuclear development program. Obama, who has faced demands from Congress to tighten sanctions, issued an executive order targeting large transactions involving the Iranian currency, the rial, in overseas banks. The goal is to further undermine a currency that has lost two-thirds of its value in two years.
WORLD
June 3, 2013 | By Shashank Bengali, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON - President Obama announced new economic sanctions on Iran on Monday in a bid to raise pressure on conservative hard-liners who have vowed not to compromise with the West over Tehran's nuclear development program. Obama, who has faced demands from Congress to tighten sanctions, issued an executive order targeting large transactions involving the Iranian currency, the rial, in overseas banks. The goal is to further undermine a currency that has lost two-thirds of its value in two years.
OPINION
January 16, 2010
This week's indictment of three Glendale men for allegedly smuggling vacuum pumps and other industrial equipment to Iran via the United Arab Emirates is the latest reminder of how easily and frequently U.S. trade sanctions against Tehran have been violated. The charges were reported as the five permanent members of the U.N. Security Council and Germany prepared to meet in New York today to discuss tougher economic measures for pressing Iran to halt its uranium enrichment program. Often called "the liberal alternative" to war, economic sanctions have long been favored by world powers over military action to achieve their foreign policy goals, and the Obama administration sees sanctions as the logical response to Iran's failure to accept an offer to ship its uranium stockpile to France and Russia for conversion into nuclear fuel there.
WORLD
November 4, 2011 | By Paul Richter, Los Angeles Times
Despite weeks of tough warnings, the Obama administration has backed away from its calls to impose new and potentially crippling economic sanctions against Iran in retaliation for an alleged plot to kill Saudi Arabia's ambassador on U.S. soil, according to diplomats and American officials. Though U.S. officials had declared that they would "hold Iran accountable" for a purported plot, they now have decided that a proposed move against Iran's central bank could disrupt international oil markets and further damage the reeling American and world economies.
WORLD
January 29, 2012 | By Paul Richter and Ramin Mostaghim, Los Angeles Times
By imposing new economic sanctions that aim to punish ordinary Iranians as well as high-ranking officials, Washington and its European allies have embraced a risky strategy that could backfire on their efforts to stop Tehran's suspected nuclear weapons program. The Obama and George W. Bush administrations sought for years to pressure Iran with so-called smart sanctions that targeted the country's elites. But in recent weeks, the Obama administration and its allies have thrown smart sanctions overboard, slapping Iran with broad restrictions on oil exports and banking that they hope will damage the economy so badly that they force the leadership to change course.
WORLD
September 28, 2009 | Paul Richter
Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates said Sunday that the severe sanctions the West is threatening against Iran could force a change in the Islamic Republic's nuclear ambitions, especially since the country is already under severe economic distress. Speaking as officials from six world powers prepare to meet with Iranian negotiators this week to discuss Tehran's nuclear program, Gates noted that the unemployment rate for Iran's young people is 40%, and asserted that past economic sanctions "are having an impact."
OPINION
July 26, 2010 | By Heather Robinson
Foreign ministers of European Union member states are meeting in Brussels on Monday to finalize new sanctions against Iran. As Iran's second-largest trading partner, Germany has a responsibility — and great leverage over Iran. Germany should lead the way, as an issue of conscience, in making sure these sanctions have teeth — and that the Islamic Republic feels their bite. "Germany, with its anti-Semitic past, is now the biggest supporter in Europe of this anti-Semitic regime — it's a scandal," said Ulrike Becker, a founding member of Stop the Bomb, a human rights organization of German and Austrian intellectuals and activists dedicated to preventing the mullahs from acquiring nuclear weapons.
NEWS
July 26, 2001 | ESTHER SCHRADER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Senate voted Wednesday to extend for five years a law that authorizes penalties against foreign firms investing in Libyan or Iranian energy projects--a victory for the families of victims of terrorist attacks sponsored by those countries, and a defeat for oil companies. The House was expected to follow suit today, renewing the Iran and Libya Sanctions Act, and strengthening the sanctions against Libya. Existing sanctions, which expire Aug.
WORLD
February 6, 2013 | By Paul Richter
WASHINGTON -- The Obama administration slapped new sanctions on Iran's state broadcasting agency and Internet-policing agencies Wednesday as economic sanctions enacted last summer also took effect. The actions are part of an effort to force the Iranian government to curb its nuclear program, which the United States and many other nations believe is designed to develop nuclear weapons capability. Iran maintains it is enriching uranium for peaceful purposes only. The newest sanctions, announced by the Treasury Department, are aimed at Iranian agencies and companies that stifle dissent and impede the free flow of information.
WORLD
March 14, 2012 | By Paul Richter and Alex Rodriguez, Los Angeles Times
  China'slargest bank has backed out of a deal to finance a proposed Iran-to-Pakistan gas pipeline that is opposed by the United States, a potential sign of the lengthening reach of U.S. economic sanctions on Iran. Pakistani officials confirmed Wednesday that Industrial and Commercial Bank of China had withdrawn from plans to head a consortium that would finance the $1.6-billion Pakistani portion of the cross-border pipeline, apparently over concern that the bank could be excluded from the U.S. economy.
WORLD
January 29, 2012 | By Paul Richter and Ramin Mostaghim, Los Angeles Times
By imposing new economic sanctions that aim to punish ordinary Iranians as well as high-ranking officials, Washington and its European allies have embraced a risky strategy that could backfire on their efforts to stop Tehran's suspected nuclear weapons program. The Obama and George W. Bush administrations sought for years to pressure Iran with so-called smart sanctions that targeted the country's elites. But in recent weeks, the Obama administration and its allies have thrown smart sanctions overboard, slapping Iran with broad restrictions on oil exports and banking that they hope will damage the economy so badly that they force the leadership to change course.
NATIONAL
December 15, 2011 | By Kathleen Hennessey, Washington Bureau
Ending a weeks-long tangle with the White House, Congress approved a sweeping defense bill Thursday that includes controversial provisions on handling detainees accused of terrorism and tough new sanctions on Iran. The National Defense Authorization Act of 2012 passed the Senate on a 86-13 vote, a solid show of support that belied the considerable opposition and debate behind it. Several Democrats said they voted for the bill — which sets Pentagon policy, authorizes $662 billion in spending and gives service members a pay raise — despite their concerns about the detainee provisions.
WORLD
November 4, 2011 | By Paul Richter, Los Angeles Times
Despite weeks of tough warnings, the Obama administration has backed away from its calls to impose new and potentially crippling economic sanctions against Iran in retaliation for an alleged plot to kill Saudi Arabia's ambassador on U.S. soil, according to diplomats and American officials. Though U.S. officials had declared that they would "hold Iran accountable" for a purported plot, they now have decided that a proposed move against Iran's central bank could disrupt international oil markets and further damage the reeling American and world economies.
WORLD
November 16, 2010 | By Borzou Daragahi, Los Angeles Times
A leading Iranian official acknowledged Monday that an arms cache seized last month in Nigeria belonged to a private company with links to Iran but insisted that the "misunderstandings" between the two nations had been resolved. Foreign Minister Manouchehr Mottaki said the weapons shipment was meant for another West African country, according to the semiofficial Fars News Agency. Nigerians later identified the country as Gambia. Mottaki, returning to Tehran from a tour of four West African countries, including Nigeria, told reporters he had answered the concerns of counterparts in Nigeria, which feared the weapons were meant to support the Movement for the Emancipation of the Niger Delta.
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