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Sand Castles

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 3, 1992 | BILL BILLITER
Big sand castles, but no world record. That's the scaled-down goal of the Huntington Beach Amateur Sand Castle Festival today. Initially, the festival coordinator, the Huntington Beach Conference and Visitors Bureau, announced there would be "an attempt to build the world's longest sand sculpture." But on Thursday, a spokeswoman for the bureau said that goal had been scrapped. "We found out that we'd have to build a sculpture more than 5.
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NEWS
April 7, 2014 | By Jay Jones
Beautiful - if fleeting - works of art will be sculpted from sand when the the Original Imperial Beach Sandcastle Competition returns July 19 to the San Diego County town. Professional sand sculptors will compete for $17,000 in prize money as they spend five hours on the beach creating their masterpieces as part of the Sun & Sea Festival . The competition will take place from 9 a.m.-2 p.m. During the same time, children can test their skills in the “Kids 'n Kastles” sand castle contest.
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NEWS
May 31, 1992 | Associated Press
U.S. and Dutch sand sculptors are nearing completion of a fairy-tale city of sand castles and monuments that will be the largest sand sculpture ever built in Europe. A cluster of spires soaring to a height of a 47.9 feet has already broken the earlier record of 33 feet set at last year's Scheveningen International Sand Sculpture Festival, organizer Gonnie Been said Friday. The sand city, to be completed today, is meant to represent the 12-nation European Community's drive toward union.
HOME & GARDEN
July 14, 2012 | Chris Erskine
Like Charlie Sheen, I have no explanation for the things I do lately, other than they are on a whim and keep you guessing. Last week, I Dark Knighted across Newport Harbor with the equivalent of a Jet Ski on my back. Eventually I splashed down in a puddle of my own juices. Well done. This week, I am back at my Walden Pond (the Pacific Ocean), building sand castles with one of the best in the business, Greg LeBon, who has collected all sorts of awards that you didn't even know existed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 28, 1986 | HERBERT J. VIDA
It may seem like easy work, being a professional sand castle builder. But Kent B. Trollen, 38, of Newport Beach says there are some hang-ups. For one thing, the sand castle building season lasts only from May through October. For another, pros can't build just anywhere. "The wedge-shaped sand in Seal Beach is the best," said Trollen, who charges up to $60 an hour for his sometimes massive sculptures.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 14, 1986 | LEONARD BERNSTEIN, Times Staff Writer
David Peterson was sitting at home trying to decide what to sculpt from the Imperial Beach sand this weekend when his glance fell on a token from his dentist: a mold of his recently repaired lower teeth. Peterson phoned his dentist. The dentist phoned his technician. And with the help of seven friends, the trio performed a little oral surgery at the sixth annual U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 2, 2001 | JEFF GOTTLIEB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They aim to be captains of industry, men and women who will steer the ship of capitalism through the rough seas of the 21st century. So how do 140 UC Irvine business administration students learn to get the best out of their employees, to run the most efficient businesses? On Friday, class convened near Lifeguard Station 5 in Huntington Beach, where professors told the first-year master's students to build sand castles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 2, 2001 | JEFF GOTTLIEB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They aim to be captains of industry, men and women who will steer the ship of capitalism through the rough seas of the 21st century. So how do 140 UC Irvine business administration students learn to get the best out of their employees, to run the most efficient businesses? On Friday, class convened in Huntington Beach, where professors told the first-year master's students to build sand castles.
BOOKS
September 14, 2003 | David Waltner-Toews
We speak with voices neither of men nor angels. We speak with the ephemeral complexity of electrons, a conversation of sand castles, articulating perplexity, retreating to a sigh of candy wrappers, pop cans, foam and kelp-litter, scraps of garbage information, dissimulation, thoughts for gulls to squabble over. And as the sea sucks back, a crab, incredible, unthinking, hard quotidian experience, a wonder of survival, scuttles over the traces of our castles.
NEWS
February 19, 1986 | RICHARD EDER, Times Book Critic
Time Sharing by Richard Krawiec (Viking: $14.95) Children build sand castles on the beach and come back the next morning to see what the waves have done to them. Or they build sand castles and kick them over right away. There is a difference, though it may seem hard to pin down. The first is artistic creation. You build, and relinquish what you build to time and the world outside. The second is an aborted gesture, a snatching-back, a game for one player.
NEWS
February 3, 2008 | Jeremy Manier, Chicago Tribune
You might think scientists would have figured out by now the answers to such basic questions as why water droplets splash, why sand castles collapse and what makes shaving cream so creamy. But no one has solved those puzzles, and that's why physicists at the University of Chicago are launching an $1.8-million study of how fluid flows and why things fall apart. The technical term for their subject is "catastrophic deformation," which describes many processes we see every day. Take those water droplets.
BOOKS
September 14, 2003 | David Waltner-Toews
We speak with voices neither of men nor angels. We speak with the ephemeral complexity of electrons, a conversation of sand castles, articulating perplexity, retreating to a sigh of candy wrappers, pop cans, foam and kelp-litter, scraps of garbage information, dissimulation, thoughts for gulls to squabble over. And as the sea sucks back, a crab, incredible, unthinking, hard quotidian experience, a wonder of survival, scuttles over the traces of our castles.
SPORTS
August 9, 2002 | J.A. Adande
Is it me, or has everyone on the women's beach volleyball tour been each other's playing partner at some point? "It seems like it, doesn't it?" says Holly McPeak, America's all-time leader on the women's money list. "It seems like we all end up playing with each other." People grow apart, they stop winning, they look for the bigger, better deal. But McPeak might want to make her partnership with Elaine Youngs a permanent one.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 2, 2001 | JEFF GOTTLIEB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They aim to be captains of industry, men and women who will steer the ship of capitalism through the rough seas of the 21st century. So how do 140 UC Irvine business administration students learn to get the best out of their employees, to run the most efficient businesses? On Friday, class convened near Lifeguard Station 5 in Huntington Beach, where professors told the first-year master's students to build sand castles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 2, 2001 | JEFF GOTTLIEB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They aim to be captains of industry, men and women who will steer the ship of capitalism through the rough seas of the 21st century. So how do 140 UC Irvine business administration students learn to get the best out of their employees, to run the most efficient businesses? On Friday, class convened in Huntington Beach, where professors told the first-year master's students to build sand castles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 1, 1998 | STEVE CARNEY
Entries are being sought for the second-oldest sand-castle contest in the country, scheduled for Sept. 13 at Big Corona State Beach. Teams of up to eight members are welcome to participate in the 37-year-old affair, but space is limited, so early entry is encouraged. The contest will run from 10 a.m. until 4 p.m., and spectators will be able to view the castles in all their grainy grandeur until 5.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 3, 1988 | LANIE JONES, Times Staff Writer
A large wave battered the south wall of the sand castle. But the two boys knee-deep in a pool of seawater inside the central "courtyard" of their castle barely noticed. Mike Stephens, 11, and Daniel Fortier, 10, were more intent on the job at hand: shaping small mounds of wet sand into block "houses," the beginnings of a small peasants' village inside a kingdom made of equal parts grit and fantasy.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 15, 1986 | ROBERT KOEHLER
If you were in the shoes of a nice family like Glen, Ginger and Kim and their friends, Stephen and Carol, would you stay on a plot of beach populated with drug dealers, hookers, freaked-out surfers, vagrants, the occasional mobster and cop and other strange human detritus? Of course not: You'd pick up the beach towels and pizza and sidle your way down to an open, safer patch.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 1998 | K.C. COLE, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
It's odd how the everyday things are often the most mysterious. How mind springs from inanimate matter, for instance. Or the nature of space, or time. Which came first, the chicken or the egg? What is matter, and why does it have mass? How exactly does gravity work? Scientists still don't know what drives the erratic magnetic compass of the Earth, or where the moon came from, or why the sun boils up in cycles of 11 years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 8, 1997 | JOCELYN Y. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For most of the day Sunday the promises were hard to believe. Sure, they were architects accustomed to creating things, but this time they were out of their element: on a beach, under the sun, in the sand. Busily at work, wearing shorts and bikinis, they sounded like the most wishful of thinkers. "It's a crash landing of a spacecraft, little aliens will crawl out," said Phillip Han of Altoon and Porter, holding a bucket of water while his colleagues toted water and shoveled.
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