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TRAVEL
June 13, 2004 | Ben Brazil, Special to The Times
"Do you like to fly?" Jose asked, the silver rims around his front teeth glinting in the desert sunlight. I was sitting in the back of a jerry-built dune buggy, and Jose was looking at me from the driver's seat, smoking a cigarette and grinning like a teenage drag racer. His arm was draped around a curvy tourist, and he was joyfully dispensing a warning to his passengers: He would soon be driving very fast. If he didn't, he told us, we might get stuck in the sand.
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TRAVEL
June 13, 2004 | Ben Brazil, Special to The Times
"Do you like to fly?" Jose asked, the silver rims around his front teeth glinting in the desert sunlight. I was sitting in the back of a jerry-built dune buggy, and Jose was looking at me from the driver's seat, smoking a cigarette and grinning like a teenage drag racer. His arm was draped around a curvy tourist, and he was joyfully dispensing a warning to his passengers: He would soon be driving very fast. If he didn't, he told us, we might get stuck in the sand.
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NEWS
May 28, 1999 | DAN ARRITT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Sandboarding?" repeats the 20-something employee at the tidy Newport Beach surf and ski shop. "You mean skimboarding, don't you?" He leans forward, waiting for confirmation of his interpretation. After all, skimboarding is performed on wet sand. Maybe this customer is just new to the area. When the answer is rejected, the bewildered employee straightens up, tugs on his goatee and excitedly replies, "Ohhhh, OK. I know what you're talking about now.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 2003 | Kimberly White, Special to The Times
Florence, Ore. At the top of the slope, Erik Johnson is a tall, lanky figure silhouetted against a sky darkening with rain. He peers down the face of the run, straightens, then slowly begins to slide his body from side to side, swaying as if to the sound of distant music. He leans forward, feet strapped to his board, and pushes over the rim. Sliding down the hill, he gathers speed, trailing a pale spray of sand. Sand?
ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 2003 | Kimberly White, Special to The Times
Florence, Ore. At the top of the slope, Erik Johnson is a tall, lanky figure silhouetted against a sky darkening with rain. He peers down the face of the run, straightens, then slowly begins to slide his body from side to side, swaying as if to the sound of distant music. He leans forward, feet strapped to his board, and pushes over the rim. Sliding down the hill, he gathers speed, trailing a pale spray of sand. Sand?
NEWS
May 30, 1999 | NANCY WRIDE
Carvin' dune. That's what the growing bunch of extreme sportos call riding a board down a wall of sand at 50 mph. Sandboarders get the same thrills as their downhill brethren the snowboarders, with one big advantage: They can carve dunes year-round. But where does a Southern Californian find dunes high enough to create the big air of champions? Jason Ford of Valencia, ranked seventh in the nation, rides Manhattan Beach's Sand Dune Park, which boasts 200-foot dunes. The best feature?
NEWS
October 28, 2003 | Jordan Rane
Geotrekkers, barrel racers and fans of other wild and wacky outdoor endeavors will find kindred spirits at this site, a fledgling cyber forum for those who'd rather chat about roaring down a slope on a mountain board than hiking up one on foot. Registered guests can post questions ("I want to make a summer cliff-diving trip around Colorado, but I do not know where the hot spots are"), provide answers ("Horsetooth Reservoir, Ft.
TRAVEL
September 9, 2007 | Hugo Martín, Times Staff Writer
The polished board strapped to my feet feels fast and light. I shift my weight forward and launch myself down a 50-foot sand dune, through a wide curvy path bordered by spiky European beach grass. Bend your knees, I was told. Point your lead arm in the direction you want to go. Can it be that easy? It's a cloudy but warm summer afternoon along the central Oregon coast, and this is my third attempt at sandboarding.
REAL ESTATE
July 1, 2007 | Diane Wedner, Times Staff Writer
Early Hermosa Beach visitors towed their tiny suburban cottages to and from the seaside on mule-drawn skids to summer by the sea. Today, buyers drop millions for the same ocean views, importing Mexican pavers for porches the size of the original bungalows. Early days Surfing pioneers George Freeth, Greg Knoll and Phil Becker all hung out in Hermosa Beach, and the town still is a surfers' magnet.
NEWS
September 10, 1996 | ROY RIVENBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The location is identical, but any similarity between this convention and the Republican one a few weeks ago ends on that note. Instead of delegates clothed in red, white and blue finery, there are humans sporting tattooed craniums, gas masks and 87-pound suits made from pennies. In place of helium balloons, there are silicone-inflated babes in bikinis. And instead of CNN and the Washington Post, there are journalists from WIG, Hot Lava and Tongue magazines.
NEWS
May 28, 1999 | DAN ARRITT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Sandboarding?" repeats the 20-something employee at the tidy Newport Beach surf and ski shop. "You mean skimboarding, don't you?" He leans forward, waiting for confirmation of his interpretation. After all, skimboarding is performed on wet sand. Maybe this customer is just new to the area. When the answer is rejected, the bewildered employee straightens up, tugs on his goatee and excitedly replies, "Ohhhh, OK. I know what you're talking about now.
TRAVEL
June 10, 2001 | ADAM HERSH, Adam Hersh is an attorney who lives in Ecuador
In Huanchaco, a small beach town on the Pacific, fishermen still use caballitos de totora --small, reed fishing boats that date from the Mochica culture of the first millennium. Carrying little more than a net and paddle, these fishermen return from the sea with scores of fresh dolphin and sea bass. Their way of life, virtually unchanged over the centuries, is a reminder of the abundance of coastal Peru, which flourishes in spite of--or is it because of?
SPORTS
February 22, 1991 | MIKE REILLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With a deep tan and blond hair, Dana Nicholson looks as though he just finished ripping through a heat on the Assn. of Surfing Professionals tour. But don't be fooled by appearances. His surfer image is only half of Nicholson's story. We'll let him tell the rest. "There's nothing like hiking up a mountain in the morning and putting your board on the edge of a cliff," he said. "And then just going off."
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