Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSandelman Associates
IN THE NEWS

Sandelman Associates

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
October 3, 1994 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Numbers roll off Bob Sandelman's tongue faster than he can flip through his latest stack of statistics on what Americans think of fast-food and pizza places. About 96% of those living in metropolitan areas go to such eateries at least once a month, he says. Altogether, they average 12 trips a month for breakfast, lunch, dinner or snacks. That means that nearly everybody, he says, is getting food from McDonald's or Domino's or some other chain every two or three days.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
December 22, 2011 | By Tiffany Hsu, Los Angeles Times
Fast-food eateries are in the throes of drive-through Darwinism as more upscale upstarts, such as Chipotle Mexican Grill and Panera Bread Co., grab market share from the likes of Taco Bell, Subway and Wendy's. Chains that are fancier than fast-food options but cheaper than sit-down alternatives are part of a hybrid sector known as fast-casual that is maturing into one of the food industry's strongest. That category is tapping into growing demand for more healthful, specialty foods that are still speedily served and moderately priced.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
December 22, 2011 | By Tiffany Hsu, Los Angeles Times
Fast-food eateries are in the throes of drive-through Darwinism as more upscale upstarts, such as Chipotle Mexican Grill and Panera Bread Co., grab market share from the likes of Taco Bell, Subway and Wendy's. Chains that are fancier than fast-food options but cheaper than sit-down alternatives are part of a hybrid sector known as fast-casual that is maturing into one of the food industry's strongest. That category is tapping into growing demand for more healthful, specialty foods that are still speedily served and moderately priced.
BUSINESS
October 3, 1994 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Numbers roll off Bob Sandelman's tongue faster than he can flip through his latest stack of statistics on what Americans think of fast-food and pizza places. About 96% of those living in metropolitan areas go to such eateries at least once a month, he says. Altogether, they average 12 trips a month for breakfast, lunch, dinner or snacks. That means that nearly everybody, he says, is getting food from McDonald's or Domino's or some other chain every two or three days.
BUSINESS
March 6, 2001 | LESLIE EARNEST
On its Web site, In-N-Out Burger displays a double-decker burger, a pile of fries and the following statement: "Quality you can taste." Plenty of people would agree with that statement, according to a survey released Monday by Sandelman & Associates Inc., a Villa Park restaurant research firm. The Irvine-based chain aced out 75 other fast-food chains for the best overall score.
BUSINESS
February 5, 1993 | DENISE GELLENE
Fears about violent crime are causing more and more Californians to turn to chemical weapons, legal or not. Law enforcement authorities report a sharp rise in licenses issued to carry tear gas, an eye irritant that can cause temporary blindness. Authorities also note a thriving underground market for pepper gas, a potent spray illegal for civilian use in California. "The riots, gang problems, carjackings. Some people are really scared," said Rod Hibben of the California Department of Justice.
BUSINESS
October 29, 1999 | GREG HERNANDEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Del Taco Inc., the nation's second-largest Mexican fast-food chain, said Thursday it will increase its number of restaurants by more than 60% thanks to new franchise agreements that will add 215 restaurants, half of which will be outside Southern California. The deals with 28 franchisees will give the Laguna Hills-based company more than 500 restaurants within the next three years. Industry leader Taco Bell Corp., based in Irvine, has more than 7,000 locations.
BUSINESS
May 26, 2000 | GREG HERNANDEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In-N-Out Burger continues to draw raves from burger aficionados. In its latest coup, the Irvine chain ranked No. 1 in overall customer satisfaction, topping 70 other chains in a new nationwide survey of 87,600 fast-food consumers. Customers gave In-N-Out their highest rating in such categories as flavor, quality, friendly employees and cleanliness, according to the survey, released Thursday by Sandelman & Associates, a Villa Park firm that tracks trends in the fast food industry.
BUSINESS
April 29, 1993 | ALEXEI BARRIONUEVO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In their corporate war rooms and across the nation's restaurant battlefields, three leading pizza chains are firing their dough at a burgeoning campaign: cheaper pizza. Bombarded for years by Little Caesar's value-priced, two-for-one pizza offer, Pepsico's Pizza Hut unit is launching an all-out counterattack Monday with Big Foot--a 21-slice, 2-by-1-foot pie priced at between $9 and $11.
BUSINESS
September 18, 1992 | CONSELLA A. LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ah, sweet ambience. Soft lights. Music. Table service. And while Chardonnay isn't on the menu yet, Burger King is dressing for dinner. The Miami-based fast-food giant said Thursday that it will introduce table service at dinner and an expanded evening menu at its more than 5,700 restaurants across the country over the next couple of weeks. It is a move that will make Burger King the first national fast-food restaurant to do so.
BUSINESS
May 9, 2006 | Jerry Hirsch, Times Staff Writer
El Pollo Loco is about to add a new item to the menu -- shares in the fast-food chain. An arm of Trimaran Capital Partners, a New York asset management firm, filed a registration statement with the Securities and Exchange Commission on Monday, saying that it planned to sell a stake in the Irvine-based Mexican-themed chicken restaurant company to the public.
BUSINESS
August 8, 2006 | Martin Zimmerman, Times Staff Writer
The new head of In-N-Out Burgers said Monday that the venerable restaurant chain would remain in family hands and stay true to its time-tested strategy -- a simple menu and slow but steady growth -- after the death of company matriarch Esther L. Snyder. "The family is absolutely committed to keeping the company private and family operated," said Mark Taylor, who took over as president after co-founder Snyder died Friday at the age of 86.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|