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Sandhill Cranes

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NEWS
May 4, 2004 | David Lukas
[GRUS CANADENSIS] Because they stand about 5 feet tall and bugle loudly, cranes make an indelible impression. Their courtship dances inspired early human dancing and, some historians say, their form in flight influenced shapes in the Roman alphabet. Sandhill cranes draw a particularly devout audience in California, where thousands of people swarm the vast Central Valley each winter to ogle its famous flocks.
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NATIONAL
February 8, 2014 | By Paresh Dave
North America's tallest bird, with a population of about 600, has lost three adults to gunfire in recent months, which "senselessly" undercuts plans to breed a thriving population of the radiant white whooping crane, wildlife authorities say. Decades of research and millions of dollars have been spent by government and private organizations to revive the species, whose population shrank to 23 in 1954, according to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service....
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NEWS
October 12, 2011 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times Daily Travel & Deal blogger
Birding with Jane Goodall is a fantastic notion, but not an unrealistic one this spring. The naturalist best known for her longtime work among chimps in Africa will be on hand for a March trip to witness the migration of sandhill cranes at preserves and viewing areas in Kearney, Neb. The Jane Goodall Institute sponsors this four-day trip that features an evening of crane viewing plus cocktails and dinner with Goodall. Other activities include visiting the Rowe Sanctuary on the Platt River, birding and hiking in Rainwater Basin with natural history author Scott Weidensaul and naturalist Bill Wallauer and a nature photography workshop.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 15, 2013 | By Bettina Boxall
The state is moving the route of a proposed tunnel system in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta away from north delta communities to a land preserve that is an important winter home for the greater sandhill crane and other migratory birds in the Pacific Flyway. The realignment, announced Thursday by the California Natural Resources Agency, is intended to lessen the project's effects on north delta residents who have complained fiercely about the proposal - in some instances refusing to let state survey crews on their property.
NEWS
November 26, 1995 | RICHARD BENKE, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Is it a bird? A plane? It's an ultra-light plane painted to look like a bird--a good enough disguise to get a small flock of sandhill cranes to migrate 800 miles in 11 days. "I suppose it's like mom and dad," said Jim Lewis, a biologist with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, which helps fund the migration experiment. Because cranes learn their migration routes from their parents, scientists trained 11 sandhill cranes bred in captivity to follow the ultra-light plane south.
NEWS
May 7, 2006 | Margery Beck, Associated Press Writer
To the human eye, the shallow, muddy Platte River surrounded by razed cornfields and brown pastureland is, at best, austere. To the half-million sandhill cranes that land along an 80-mile stretch of the river each spring, it's an open space to roost that doesn't offer hiding places for predators. The birds also see plenty of places to feed on scattered corn and insect-rich cow dung.
NEWS
February 25, 1987 | Associated Press
A sculptor has been hired to produce the tallest bronze sculpture in North America, a six-story-high study of two sandhill cranes, to stand near Omaha's Eppley Airfield. The Omaha Airport Authority commissioned John Raimondi to create the $460,000 work, which will depict the birds in their mating dance.
NEWS
July 20, 2004
My son (38) and I (78) just finished a guided float trip through the Box Canyon of the Henry's Fork of the Snake River in Idaho, starting just below Island Park Dam and ending at Last Chance. We bagged 45 rainbow trout (from a few to 20 inches) on this catch-and-release section. Saw sandhill cranes, great blue herons and bald eagles. William E. Webster Bakersfield
NEWS
October 4, 2005 | Susan Tweit, Susan J. Tweit is the author of, most recently, "The San Luis Valley: Sand Dunes and Sandhill Cranes," from which this essay is adapted. Her website is susanjtweit.com.
THE CRANES CALLED to me one windy September night. I lay on the couch, absorbed in a novel when a distant sound -- compelling, familiar -- propelled me upright. There it was again, faint but unmistakable: "Khrrrrr, Khrrrrr," the throaty cry of sandhill cranes. I rushed outside to search the sky, but it was too dark to pick out the long-necked and wide-winged forms against the star-studded blackness. Their voices sounded again from high overhead: "Khrrrrr, Khrrrrr!"
NEWS
March 22, 1993 | ANN ROVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Even before their yellow bus lumbered to a stop on a rural road skirting a frozen marsh in this Rocky Mountain valley, dozens of impatient passengers were wiping the frosty windows for a view of one of nature's most ancient rituals. Standing like sentries in the early morning light were some of the 20,000, 4 1/2-foot-tall sandhill cranes that have been coming to the San Luis Valley each March for millennia to court and dance with their lifelong mates. "Ooh! Look at them all!"
NATIONAL
March 16, 2013 | By David Kelly
Just before sunrise, a hardy band of men and women gathered near a barley field in the remote San Luis Valley to await the dawn. Some fiddled with their cameras while others nervously scanned the cold, empty sky. As golden sunlight broke over the mountains, a distant trumpeting filled the air. Thousands of primeval-looking birds with long necks and dagger-like beaks appeared overhead. Their numbers were staggering, the noise deafening. As they spiraled raucously down onto the field, cameras fired from every direction.
NEWS
October 12, 2011 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times Daily Travel & Deal blogger
Birding with Jane Goodall is a fantastic notion, but not an unrealistic one this spring. The naturalist best known for her longtime work among chimps in Africa will be on hand for a March trip to witness the migration of sandhill cranes at preserves and viewing areas in Kearney, Neb. The Jane Goodall Institute sponsors this four-day trip that features an evening of crane viewing plus cocktails and dinner with Goodall. Other activities include visiting the Rowe Sanctuary on the Platt River, birding and hiking in Rainwater Basin with natural history author Scott Weidensaul and naturalist Bill Wallauer and a nature photography workshop.
NEWS
December 2, 2007 | Melanie Dabovich, Associated Press
Dozens of photographers and birders stood at the bank of the shallow pond, patiently waiting in the biting cold for the main act to take the stage. Suddenly, as if trigged by an unseen instinctual cue, hundreds of snow geese and sandhill cranes began calling to each other as the sun peeked over the desert horizon.
NEWS
May 7, 2006 | Margery Beck, Associated Press Writer
To the human eye, the shallow, muddy Platte River surrounded by razed cornfields and brown pastureland is, at best, austere. To the half-million sandhill cranes that land along an 80-mile stretch of the river each spring, it's an open space to roost that doesn't offer hiding places for predators. The birds also see plenty of places to feed on scattered corn and insect-rich cow dung.
NEWS
October 4, 2005 | Susan Tweit, Susan J. Tweit is the author of, most recently, "The San Luis Valley: Sand Dunes and Sandhill Cranes," from which this essay is adapted. Her website is susanjtweit.com.
THE CRANES CALLED to me one windy September night. I lay on the couch, absorbed in a novel when a distant sound -- compelling, familiar -- propelled me upright. There it was again, faint but unmistakable: "Khrrrrr, Khrrrrr," the throaty cry of sandhill cranes. I rushed outside to search the sky, but it was too dark to pick out the long-necked and wide-winged forms against the star-studded blackness. Their voices sounded again from high overhead: "Khrrrrr, Khrrrrr!"
NEWS
July 20, 2004
My son (38) and I (78) just finished a guided float trip through the Box Canyon of the Henry's Fork of the Snake River in Idaho, starting just below Island Park Dam and ending at Last Chance. We bagged 45 rainbow trout (from a few to 20 inches) on this catch-and-release section. Saw sandhill cranes, great blue herons and bald eagles. William E. Webster Bakersfield
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 27, 1992 | MATT MYGATT, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Biologists for years have tried to play Cupid to a small crowd of whooping cranes living among a huge flock of their distant cousins, sandhill cranes. These efforts to boost the numbers of the whooping crane, prominent on the federal endangered species list, began with the hand-placement of whooper eggs in the sandhills' nests. Now the hope of fostering family life among the whoopers may have finally yielded results--sort of. What appears to be a hybrid whooping-sandhill crane turned up Nov.
NEWS
March 24, 1994 | RICH TOSCHES, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
So the swallows have come back to San Juan Capistrano, eh? Thousands of the dainty little creatures are making their annual pilgrimage to the old mission once more, are they? Well, put down that bucket of soapy water and stop hosing off your windshield for a few moments and read about some real birds. Manly birds. Cranes. Sandhill cranes, to be specific. Big, monster birds. Eight feet tall. Sixty-five pounds each. Wingspans of 32 feet. Eat jack rabbits and young elk.
NEWS
May 4, 2004 | David Lukas
[GRUS CANADENSIS] Because they stand about 5 feet tall and bugle loudly, cranes make an indelible impression. Their courtship dances inspired early human dancing and, some historians say, their form in flight influenced shapes in the Roman alphabet. Sandhill cranes draw a particularly devout audience in California, where thousands of people swarm the vast Central Valley each winter to ogle its famous flocks.
TRAVEL
November 22, 1998 | DONNA IKENBERRY, Ikenberry is a freelance writer and photographer whose home base is Hacienda Heights
As I write this I am sitting in my truck, deep in the heart of New Mexico's Bosque del Apache National Wildlife Refuge. It is high noon and too bright to photograph. Outside, gangs of sandhill cranes move from one field to the next, their gurgling sounds causing me to stop typing and look up in wonder. The 4-foot-tall birds, with their long, graceful necks and super-long legs, sound as if they are underwater. I marvel at the scene before me, then resume my writing.
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