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Sandi Shoemake

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ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 1990 | LEONARD FEATHER
The career of Charlie Shoemake has been divided into three segments: One as a studio and jazz sideman in Los Angeles, from 1955-66; another as a touring vibraphonist with George Shearing, 1966-72; and a third, since 1973, as arguably the most successful music teacher in the Southland, with an aggregate of 1,500 students taking classes in jazz harmony, theory and improvisation over the past 17 years.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 2, 1992 | ZAN STEWART
CHARLIE SHOEMAKE "Strollin' " Chase Music Group * * * * Shoemake, the post be-bop-oriented vibist who composes in the Gershwin-Kern tradition, knows quality material--the title track is a Horace Silver classic--and inspiring talent. Among the first-rate artists joining him here: pianist Billy Childs, guitarist Ron Eschete and vocalist Sandi Shoemake, his spouse.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 2, 1992 | ZAN STEWART
CHARLIE SHOEMAKE "Strollin' " Chase Music Group * * * * Shoemake, the post be-bop-oriented vibist who composes in the Gershwin-Kern tradition, knows quality material--the title track is a Horace Silver classic--and inspiring talent. Among the first-rate artists joining him here: pianist Billy Childs, guitarist Ron Eschete and vocalist Sandi Shoemake, his spouse.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 1990 | LEONARD FEATHER
The career of Charlie Shoemake has been divided into three segments: One as a studio and jazz sideman in Los Angeles, from 1955-66; another as a touring vibraphonist with George Shearing, 1966-72; and a third, since 1973, as arguably the most successful music teacher in the Southland, with an aggregate of 1,500 students taking classes in jazz harmony, theory and improvisation over the past 17 years.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 5, 1988 | LEONARD FEATHER
Practicing what one preaches is not the easiest task in music, but for 15 years Charlie Shoemake has combined his busy career as a teacher with appearances and recordings as a vibraphonist and composer. Sunday evening at Le Cafe in Sherman Oaks, he hit the ground flying. Playing an original tune, "Stand-Up Guys," he took an opening solo that ran to an estimated 2,500 notes, more than half of them evenly spaced eighth notes.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 1986 | ZAN STEWART
"Pop music has changed so much since the '40s that even a genius like George Gershwin wouldn't be able to sell his music today." That stern observation comes from vibist Charlie Shoemake, a man who writes songs himself and has a fondness for both the great pop music and jazz classics of the '30s, '40s and '50s.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 3, 1991 | ZAN STEWART, Zan Stewart writes regularly about jazz for Calendar
When vibist Charlie Shoemake closed his improvisation studio in the spring of 1990 and moved from the San Fernando Valley to the small town of Cambria, on the central California coast, retirement was not on his mind. "Just the opposite," says the 53-year-old vibraphonist, who, along with his wife, singer Sandi Shoemake, appears Friday at the Jazz Bakery in Culver City. "I wanted to get back into playing."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 1989 | ZAN STEWART
Saxophonist Bob Cooper, long revered for his work with Stan Kenton's orchestra, Howard Rumsey's Lighthouse All-Stars and his own small groups, has been selected for the Los Angeles Jazz Society's 1989 Tribute Award. Cooper was chosen by the society for his "contribution to the development and history of jazz," said Teri Merrill-Aarons, the organization's president-founder. Cooper will be feted at a gala presentation and concert Sept. 10 at the Hyatt Regency in downtown Los Angeles.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 11, 2003 | Don Heckman, Special to The Times
Jazz and monetary rewards rarely have gone hand in hand. The Herb Alperts, Diana Kralls and Kenny Gs are exceptions; the great majority of dedicated jazz artists are more likely to become millionaires by winning the lottery than by playing music. At least while they're alive. All too often a jazz player's music has risen to its greatest monetary value after his death. Think Charlie Parker, among many others. Then there's Charlie Shoemake.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 1989 | ZAN STEWART
As they have once a year for 15 years, be-bop-bent vibist-improvisation teacher Charlie Shoemake and his wife, singer Sandi Shoemake, last Sunday turned the living room and den of their Sherman Oaks ranch-style home into a makeshift jazz club.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 5, 1988 | LEONARD FEATHER
Practicing what one preaches is not the easiest task in music, but for 15 years Charlie Shoemake has combined his busy career as a teacher with appearances and recordings as a vibraphonist and composer. Sunday evening at Le Cafe in Sherman Oaks, he hit the ground flying. Playing an original tune, "Stand-Up Guys," he took an opening solo that ran to an estimated 2,500 notes, more than half of them evenly spaced eighth notes.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 1986 | ZAN STEWART
"Pop music has changed so much since the '40s that even a genius like George Gershwin wouldn't be able to sell his music today." That stern observation comes from vibist Charlie Shoemake, a man who writes songs himself and has a fondness for both the great pop music and jazz classics of the '30s, '40s and '50s.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 18, 1991 | ZAN STEWART, Zan Stewart writes frequently about jazz for The Times
Bill Holman is an anomaly. In an era when big bands are hanging on by their nails, and big-band composers with them, Holman continues to thrive. In fact, he's at the top of the charts. Actually, Natalie Cole's "Unforgettable" is now the No. 1 album on Billboard magazine's pop and jazz charts. But Holman, 64, a Grammy winner, crafted six arrangements for the singer--among them "Don't Get Around Much Anymore" and "Avalon." And there's more activity.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 16, 1991 | ZAN STEWART, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Bill Holman is an anomaly. In an era when big bands are hanging on by their nails, and big-band composers and arrangers with them, Holman continues to thrive. In fact, he's on the top of the charts. Well, actually it's Natalie Cole's "Unforgettable" that currently is the No. 1 album on both Billboard magazine's pop and jazz charts. But Holman, the 64-year-old Grammy winner and Orange County native, crafted six arrangements for the singer--among them "Don't Get Around Much Anymore" and "Avalon."
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