Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSandia National Laboratories
IN THE NEWS

Sandia National Laboratories

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 20, 1999
In "What's Left of Case Against Lee? Not Much" (Commentary, Dec. 14), Robert Scheer wrote that the "FBI has now switched its investigation to" Sandia National Laboratories. Sandia has worked closely with federal investigators since the espionage investigation began four years ago. Since we are responsible for the design of the nonnuclear components of nuclear warheads, it is logical that the investigators would want to talk with us. Because of our role we would assume--we would hope--that investigators will contact us as part of their probe.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 13, 2000 | CHRIS GRYGIEL, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Rescue crews searching for skiers, snowboarders and hikers buried by avalanches have to act fast--the difference between life and death is measured in minutes. A researcher says he's developed a computer program that could help crews get to avalanche victims wearing radio beacons much more quickly than current methods allow. "In traditional searches, they're really not communicating," said Rush Robinett, a researcher with the Department of Energy's Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, N.
Advertisement
NEWS
September 16, 1992 | From a Times Staff Writer
President Bush on Tuesday called on Congress to shift $166 million in savings gained this year from shutting down a major nuclear weapons project to new projects designed to guard against nuclear proliferation. The request, which follows an Administration decision to halt construction of a $1-billion tritium-producing nuclear reactor, was described by Energy Secretary James D. Watkins as a shift in priorities from "swords to plowshares."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 20, 1999
In "What's Left of Case Against Lee? Not Much" (Commentary, Dec. 14), Robert Scheer wrote that the "FBI has now switched its investigation to" Sandia National Laboratories. Sandia has worked closely with federal investigators since the espionage investigation began four years ago. Since we are responsible for the design of the nonnuclear components of nuclear warheads, it is logical that the investigators would want to talk with us. Because of our role we would assume--we would hope--that investigators will contact us as part of their probe.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 5, 1998 | REBECCA ROLWING, ASSOCIATED PRESS
A detective heading into a crime scene slips on a backpack and modified 3-D video game glasses. After he waves a special light, once-invisible fingerprints begin to flash. The portable evidence detector finds hidden semen too. Like fingerprints, semen gives off a fluorescent emission that is too weak to be seen but becomes visible with special lights and filters.
NEWS
May 17, 1998 | REBECCA ROLWING, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Scientists are fine-tuning a new transistor that cranks out computations 10 times faster than existing computer technology. The transistor, under development by federal scientists at Sandia National Laboratories, could benefit everything from computers and cell phones to satellites and toxic-materials sensors. "If you can integrate this with conventional silicon processing, it would mean cheaper, faster, smaller, better," said Paul R.
NEWS
February 13, 2000 | CHRIS GRYGIEL, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Rescue crews searching for skiers, snowboarders and hikers buried by avalanches have to act fast--the difference between life and death is measured in minutes. A researcher says he's developed a computer program that could help crews get to avalanche victims wearing radio beacons much more quickly than current methods allow. "In traditional searches, they're really not communicating," said Rush Robinett, a researcher with the Department of Energy's Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, N.
NATIONAL
December 23, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
Federal scientists have found new evidence supporting the theory that lightning sparked a massive methane gas explosion that led to the deaths of 12 Sago coal miners in January. Sandia National Laboratories says its lightning experts spent 10 days testing at the mine. They found that lightning could readily move through solid ground without a metal conductor.
BUSINESS
December 9, 1996
Smith Technology Corp. said it has received a $10 million contract to oversee asbestos removal at Sandia National Laboratories. Besides Sandia facilities in Albuquerque, where Smith's team will be based, the contract also calls for testing and other work at facilities in Livermore, Calif., Tonopah, Nev., and Kauai, Hawaii.
NATIONAL
May 13, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
University of Texas officials in Austin decided to enter the bidding to run the Los Alamos nuclear lab in New Mexico. The regents voted to pursue a joint operating agreement with Lockheed Martin Corp., which already partners with the university in research at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque. The decision puts the Texas university in direct competition with the University of California, the current operator of Los Alamos.
NEWS
May 17, 1998 | REBECCA ROLWING, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Scientists are fine-tuning a new transistor that cranks out computations 10 times faster than existing computer technology. The transistor, under development by federal scientists at Sandia National Laboratories, could benefit everything from computers and cell phones to satellites and toxic-materials sensors. "If you can integrate this with conventional silicon processing, it would mean cheaper, faster, smaller, better," said Paul R.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 5, 1998 | REBECCA ROLWING, ASSOCIATED PRESS
A detective heading into a crime scene slips on a backpack and modified 3-D video game glasses. After he waves a special light, once-invisible fingerprints begin to flash. The portable evidence detector finds hidden semen too. Like fingerprints, semen gives off a fluorescent emission that is too weak to be seen but becomes visible with special lights and filters.
NEWS
September 16, 1992 | From a Times Staff Writer
President Bush on Tuesday called on Congress to shift $166 million in savings gained this year from shutting down a major nuclear weapons project to new projects designed to guard against nuclear proliferation. The request, which follows an Administration decision to halt construction of a $1-billion tritium-producing nuclear reactor, was described by Energy Secretary James D. Watkins as a shift in priorities from "swords to plowshares."
NEWS
March 8, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
The Ronald Reagan Building is vulnerable to terrorist attack and in urgent need of security improvements because of its high degree of public access and open design, according to a confidential report by security experts at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque. The report says the General Services Administration has been warned repeatedly since the 1995 Oklahoma City federal building bombing about risks posed by the building's public garage and unrestricted entrances.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|