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Sandia National Laboratory

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BUSINESS
May 6, 1992 | JONATHAN WEBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an unexpected development, American Telephone & Telegraph said Tuesday that it will withdraw as the management contractor for Sandia National Laboratory, a $1.4-billion weapons engineering facility that the telephone giant has operated for 43 years. The move comes at an awkward time for the Albuquerque-based lab.
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NATIONAL
March 21, 2003 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Energy Department is investigating allegations of employee theft and a breakdown of discipline among security officers at its Sandia National Laboratories, a nuclear weapons research facility, the lab's president, C. Paul Robinson, said. Disciplinary actions have been taken against many of the security officers and supervisors involved in the incidents, Robinson said. Sen. Charles E.
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NEWS
May 26, 1990 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Investigators from a national laboratory, in another blow to the Navy's conclusions about the battleship Iowa disaster, told Congress on Friday that "a very simple scenario" could have accounted for the gun turret blast that killed 47 sailors last year. Bags of gunpowder could have exploded after being pressed too hard and fast by a rammer device into the 16-inch gun's barrel, Sandia National Laboratory officials said in testimony before the Senate Armed Services Committee.
NEWS
February 13, 2000 | CHRIS GRYGIEL, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Rescue crews searching for skiers, snowboarders and hikers buried by avalanches have to act fast--the difference between life and death is measured in minutes. A researcher says he's developed a computer program that could help crews get to avalanche victims wearing radio beacons much more quickly than current methods allow. "In traditional searches, they're really not communicating," said Rush Robinett, a researcher with the Department of Energy's Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, N.
NATIONAL
March 21, 2003 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Energy Department is investigating allegations of employee theft and a breakdown of discipline among security officers at its Sandia National Laboratories, a nuclear weapons research facility, the lab's president, C. Paul Robinson, said. Disciplinary actions have been taken against many of the security officers and supervisors involved in the incidents, Robinson said. Sen. Charles E.
NEWS
February 13, 2000 | CHRIS GRYGIEL, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Rescue crews searching for skiers, snowboarders and hikers buried by avalanches have to act fast--the difference between life and death is measured in minutes. A researcher says he's developed a computer program that could help crews get to avalanche victims wearing radio beacons much more quickly than current methods allow. "In traditional searches, they're really not communicating," said Rush Robinett, a researcher with the Department of Energy's Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, N.
NEWS
September 5, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Immigration and Naturalization Service agents raided a top-secret installation at Kirtland Air Force Base and arrested 16 undocumented Mexican workers, officials said. The workers, employed by a roofing contract firm, were repairing a roof at the Sandia National Laboratory, a secret weapons and nuclear research facility. Doug Brown, the INS agent in charge of the Albuquerque office, said the raid was ordered after Sandia employees reported suspicions about some of the workers.
NEWS
January 2, 1989
Part of an artillery shell containing conventional explosives and low-grade uranium was accidentally shipped to the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, where the shell sat for four days before someone realized what it was. The shell had been shipped to the lab, located east of Oakland, as unclassified freight from the Tonopah Test Range in Nevada, where a clerk had gotten it mixed up with another shipment, officials said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 8, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Security officers arrested at least 97 people at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory during a protest of the Department of Energy's proposal to resume U.S. nuclear testing, a laboratory spokeswoman said. About 200 people marched to the gates of the Livermore laboratory, 40 miles east of San Francisco, according to protest organizers. Another 15 demonstrators chained themselves to the Sandia National Laboratory across the street, said Jane Gire, a spokeswoman for Greenpeace.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 1989 | From staff and wire reports
A team of scientists at the Sandia National Laboratory announced last week that they have developed a method that uses solar power to destroy most organic pollutants found in water. The system can handle pesticides, dioxins, munitions chemicals and industrial solvents, the researchers said. Unlike present systems, which filter out toxins, the new solar-powered system breaks down the organic pollutants to smaller, less harmful components, according to their study.
BUSINESS
May 6, 1992 | JONATHAN WEBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an unexpected development, American Telephone & Telegraph said Tuesday that it will withdraw as the management contractor for Sandia National Laboratory, a $1.4-billion weapons engineering facility that the telephone giant has operated for 43 years. The move comes at an awkward time for the Albuquerque-based lab.
NEWS
May 26, 1990 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Investigators from a national laboratory, in another blow to the Navy's conclusions about the battleship Iowa disaster, told Congress on Friday that "a very simple scenario" could have accounted for the gun turret blast that killed 47 sailors last year. Bags of gunpowder could have exploded after being pressed too hard and fast by a rammer device into the 16-inch gun's barrel, Sandia National Laboratory officials said in testimony before the Senate Armed Services Committee.
MAGAZINE
July 17, 2005 | Dan Neil, Dan Neil is The Times' auto critic and writer of 800 Words, a weekly column for the magazine.
How far can we stretch a gallon of gasoline? OK, maybe it isn't a question for the ages. But with oil setting new records at more than $60 per barrel, it seems like a good time to ask. And considering that the U.S. economy is hooked on oil imported from political nightmares such as Nigeria and Saudi Arabia, and that our petrodollars support regimes that indulge Islamic radicalism, and that global warming threatens to turn Orlando into beachfront property . . .
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