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NEWS
March 7, 1990 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S.-backed Contras and the Nicaraguan government-elect opened their first formal demobilization talks Tuesday, and the rebels reiterated demands that the Sandinista Popular Army be dismantled as a key step to national peace in Nicaragua. At the same time, Contra leaders left the way open for further negotiation while pledging their "moral and material support" for President-elect Violeta Barrios de Chamorro. Chamorro, who defeated Sandinista President Daniel Ortega in elections Feb.
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NEWS
March 6, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A Sandinista army veteran has been arrested in the slaying of former Contra leader Enrique Bermudez, a spokeswoman for the Interior Ministry said in Managua. She would not name the suspect but media reports said he is Bayardo Castro, 41.
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NEWS
March 6, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A Sandinista army veteran has been arrested in the slaying of former Contra leader Enrique Bermudez, a spokeswoman for the Interior Ministry said in Managua. She would not name the suspect but media reports said he is Bayardo Castro, 41.
NEWS
March 28, 1990 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Sandinista government agreed Tuesday to give full control of the armed forces to President-elect Violeta Barrios de Chamorro when she takes office April 25 and recognized her authority to reduce the military's ranks. An accord signed by the defense minister, Gen. Humberto Ortega, and aides to Chamorro also assured that Sandinista leaders and thousands of other people residing--legally or illegally--on property seized during the decade-old Sandinista revolution will not be evicted.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 17, 1987
How refreshing it was to read your editorial "Why Contra Aid Must End" (Dec. 1). The answer you provided is obvious: End Contra aid and peace will prevail. Of course, there is no need to ponder such wasteful and non-relevant inquiries as what happens to the 10,000-foot military runway under construction north of Managua? What happens to the 110 T-55 Soviet-made tanks in possession of the Sandinistas? What happens to the 75,000-man Sandinista army? What happens to the Soviet-made Hind helicopter gunships (the so-called "flying tank")
OPINION
August 7, 1988
Why are there Americans (letters, July 26) who still side with those in control of Nicaragua? Within the past few weeks, we've seen armed thugs, some in uniform, some in mufti, break up the largest political demonstration in eight years; the country's only privately owned newspaper shut down; a church-sponsored radio station shut down for reporting the demonstration; 12 and 13-year-old boys pressed into service by the Sandinista Army, or sneaking...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 1990
The Times' editorial "Rebels Without a Cause" (March 1) is the most embarrassing editorial that I have ever read. Who is the threat to democracy in Nicaragua, the Contras or the Sandinista military and secret police? Who has fought for democracy for the last 10 years more actively and more seriously, the Contras or the Sandinistas? For those who have short memories it was the Contra battlefield victories in the battle for Rama Road, Oct. 14, 1987, and the battle for the Las Minas area, Dec. 19, 1987 (incidentally where over 10,000 Contras were inside Nicaragua involved in the battle)
OPINION
August 21, 1988
In response to "Ortega Shuts Door on Contra Talks," Part I, Aug. 14: Nicaraguan President Daniel Ortega has not shut the door. As one present at the Sapoa cease-fire talks, I would like to review what has taken place. The cease-fire agreement signed at Sapoa, Nicaragua, on March 23 is the key accomplishment of the Central American Peace Accord (Arias Peace Plan). No other Central American country has been able to effect a cease-fire agreement except Nicaragua. Every time the government of Nicaragua makes concessions, the Contras pile on new demands.
OPINION
August 24, 1986
Bravo for your editorial (Aug. 15), "Sharing the Blame," regarding the approval by Congress of the $100 million in aid for the contras. It was of immediate interest to me since I have just returned from a two-week visit to Nicaragua, where I collaborated with a group of teachers from San Diego on the renovation and expansion of an elementary school. I am a bilingual teacher from Salinas, and during my visit to the rural school I observed in classrooms, did some guest teaching, and set up a small library for the school.
NEWS
March 28, 1990 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Sandinista government agreed Tuesday to give full control of the armed forces to President-elect Violeta Barrios de Chamorro when she takes office April 25 and recognized her authority to reduce the military's ranks. An accord signed by the defense minister, Gen. Humberto Ortega, and aides to Chamorro also assured that Sandinista leaders and thousands of other people residing--legally or illegally--on property seized during the decade-old Sandinista revolution will not be evicted.
NEWS
March 25, 1990 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Contra leader who agreed to end the Nicaraguan war said Saturday that most of his men will keep their guns after Sandinista President Daniel Ortega leaves office next month and asserted that the rebels will press his successor to disband the Sandinista-led army.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 1990
The Times' editorial "Rebels Without a Cause" (March 1) is the most embarrassing editorial that I have ever read. Who is the threat to democracy in Nicaragua, the Contras or the Sandinista military and secret police? Who has fought for democracy for the last 10 years more actively and more seriously, the Contras or the Sandinistas? For those who have short memories it was the Contra battlefield victories in the battle for Rama Road, Oct. 14, 1987, and the battle for the Las Minas area, Dec. 19, 1987 (incidentally where over 10,000 Contras were inside Nicaragua involved in the battle)
NEWS
March 7, 1990 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S.-backed Contras and the Nicaraguan government-elect opened their first formal demobilization talks Tuesday, and the rebels reiterated demands that the Sandinista Popular Army be dismantled as a key step to national peace in Nicaragua. At the same time, Contra leaders left the way open for further negotiation while pledging their "moral and material support" for President-elect Violeta Barrios de Chamorro. Chamorro, who defeated Sandinista President Daniel Ortega in elections Feb.
OPINION
August 21, 1988
In response to "Ortega Shuts Door on Contra Talks," Part I, Aug. 14: Nicaraguan President Daniel Ortega has not shut the door. As one present at the Sapoa cease-fire talks, I would like to review what has taken place. The cease-fire agreement signed at Sapoa, Nicaragua, on March 23 is the key accomplishment of the Central American Peace Accord (Arias Peace Plan). No other Central American country has been able to effect a cease-fire agreement except Nicaragua. Every time the government of Nicaragua makes concessions, the Contras pile on new demands.
OPINION
August 7, 1988
Why are there Americans (letters, July 26) who still side with those in control of Nicaragua? Within the past few weeks, we've seen armed thugs, some in uniform, some in mufti, break up the largest political demonstration in eight years; the country's only privately owned newspaper shut down; a church-sponsored radio station shut down for reporting the demonstration; 12 and 13-year-old boys pressed into service by the Sandinista Army, or sneaking...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 17, 1987
How refreshing it was to read your editorial "Why Contra Aid Must End" (Dec. 1). The answer you provided is obvious: End Contra aid and peace will prevail. Of course, there is no need to ponder such wasteful and non-relevant inquiries as what happens to the 10,000-foot military runway under construction north of Managua? What happens to the 110 T-55 Soviet-made tanks in possession of the Sandinistas? What happens to the 75,000-man Sandinista army? What happens to the Soviet-made Hind helicopter gunships (the so-called "flying tank")
NEWS
March 25, 1990 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Contra leader who agreed to end the Nicaraguan war said Saturday that most of his men will keep their guns after Sandinista President Daniel Ortega leaves office next month and asserted that the rebels will press his successor to disband the Sandinista-led army.
OPINION
August 24, 1986
Bravo for your editorial (Aug. 15), "Sharing the Blame," regarding the approval by Congress of the $100 million in aid for the contras. It was of immediate interest to me since I have just returned from a two-week visit to Nicaragua, where I collaborated with a group of teachers from San Diego on the renovation and expansion of an elementary school. I am a bilingual teacher from Salinas, and during my visit to the rural school I observed in classrooms, did some guest teaching, and set up a small library for the school.
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