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Sandinista National Liberation Front

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NEWS
March 30, 1992 | Reuters
The Sandinista National Liberation Front, founded as a guerrilla force in 1961, has voted to seek membership in the Socialist International to establish itself as a mainstream leftist party and boost its foreign standing, the Sandinista-owned newspaper Barricada reported Sunday.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 4, 2012 | Tracy Wilkinson, Los Angeles Times
MEXICO CITY — Adolfo Calero, a former Coca-Cola executive who led the largest anti-Sandinista Contra rebel force in 1980s Nicaragua and served as one of its most articulate lobbyists in Washington, has died. He was 80. Calero died Saturday night in the Nicaraguan capital, Managua, of complications from lung disease, an aide told local media. Calero's career mirrored the tumultuous history of Nicaragua as it emerged from a sleepy Central American backwater to the center of the Cold War struggle.
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NEWS
July 5, 1985 | WILLIAM R. LONG, Times Staff Writer
"Invasion will be July 4 at 3:45 a.m.," said a front-page headline two weeks ago in the official Sandinista newspaper. To hardly anyone's surprise Thursday, it turned out to be one more in a series of false alarms. Sandinista army tanks and armored cars, deployed around Managua, sat silently through the sweltering day, guarding the city against another advertised U.S. attack that did not come.
NEWS
September 3, 2008 | Stephen Kinzer, Stephen Kinzer's latest book is "A Thousand Hills: Rwanda's Rebirth and the Man Who Dreamed It." His 1991 book, "Blood of Brothers: Life and War in Nicaragua," recounts his experience as the New York Times' bureau chief in Managua.
Abitter political-cultural confrontation that exploded in Nicaragua in late August could mark the final end of the passionate romance between the world's leftist intellectuals and Nicaraguan President Daniel Ortega. Ortega, you may recall, was the leader of the Sandinista National Liberation Front when it seized power after overthrowing the 40-year Somoza family dynasty. A dashing young revolutionary who electrified liberals and leftists around the world, Ortega served as Nicaragua's president for most of the 1980s.
NEWS
October 22, 1989 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush signed a bill Saturday providing $9 million in U.S. government aid for Nicaragua's presidential campaign, but some officials said they fear their chance to engineer a victory by the country's pro-American opposition already has slipped away. Bush, who signed the bill at the presidential retreat at Camp David, Md., said last week that the aid, most of which is intended to fund officially nonpartisan poll-watching and get-out-the-vote efforts, was "the only way . . .
NEWS
May 11, 1990 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Sandinista union representing Nicaragua's 40,000 government employees declared an indefinite strike Thursday, plunging President Violeta Barrios de Chamorro into her first labor crisis two weeks after taking office. The union called the strike after Chamorro suspended the civil service law to give her Cabinet ministers a free hand to dismiss senior holdovers from the Sandinista administration and to reorganize the government bureaucracy.
NEWS
August 31, 1986
Afghanistan Soviet troops invaded Afghanistan in December, 1979, to stabilize the Afghan Marxist government in Kabul, which took power in an April, 1978, revolution, against pro-monarchy traditionalists and Muslim fundamentalists. The continuing civil war has become known as the "holy war" to the thousands of Afghan rebels, who hold much of the countryside against an estimated 115,000 to 120,000 Soviet troops and at least 50,000 Afghan government troops.
NEWS
May 27, 1994 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The last time President Violeta Barrios de Chamorro tried to fire Gen. Humberto Ortega, the powerful army chief lashed out publicly at government officials for having "sold out" to pressure from Washington. He refused to budge. Months later, Ortega has finally agreed to step down, having successfully delayed his retirement date by more than a year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 17, 1990 | DON SHANNON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The State Department had not yet granted a visa Wednesday for a former Sandinista official now serving in Nicaragua's new government, infuriating faculty members at Southern California universities where he was scheduled to speak this week. "This is vicious harassment," said Prof. Michael Emery, head of the journalism department at Cal State Northridge. "I have been calling since last week and could only find out that no decision had been made."
NEWS
March 7, 1990 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Daniel Ortega, preparing to move into the political opposition, announced Tuesday that his government will abolish a controversial media law that gave the state exclusive rights to operate a television station. The move would open the way for the Sandinista National Liberation Front to set up a television channel before Ortega turns the government over to President-elect Violeta Barrios de Chamorro on April 25.
NEWS
April 19, 1997 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Barely 100 days into his right-wing administration, President Arnoldo Aleman has been forced to do exactly what he criticized his moderate predecessor for doing: cede privileges to the far left. All week, about 5,000 demonstrators heeded the call of the leftist Sandinista National Liberation Front, the largest opposition political party, to block highways across the country in protest of Aleman's free-market economic policies.
NEWS
October 22, 1996 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Arnoldo Aleman got into politics to defeat the Marxists who confiscated his coffee fields while his wife had terminal cancer and who held him in jail when his father died. He succeeded Monday. With votes still coming in from outlying precincts, he took a lead that virtually assured him victory in this nation's presidential election.
NEWS
May 27, 1994 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The last time President Violeta Barrios de Chamorro tried to fire Gen. Humberto Ortega, the powerful army chief lashed out publicly at government officials for having "sold out" to pressure from Washington. He refused to budge. Months later, Ortega has finally agreed to step down, having successfully delayed his retirement date by more than a year.
NEWS
May 24, 1994 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A bitterly divided Sandinista Front reelected hard-line leader Daniel Ortega to head the party Monday in a major defeat for moderates who had sought to reform an organization that won a revolution 15 years ago but today is struggling to return to power. Ending a four-day convention, Sandinista delegates chose a 15-member National Directorate, or executive council, dominated by orthodox leftists and former guerrilla commanders.
NEWS
August 27, 1993 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Perhaps it is most telling that Nicaragua's hostage crisis was resolved while President Violeta Barrios de Chamorro was out of the country. By the time it was over, her government had essentially ceded a portion of national territory to one band of kidnaping gunmen and allowed another--weapons in hand--to travel in a raucous caravan to the airport for a flight to the destination of its choice.
NEWS
August 2, 1993 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Troops were bearing down on the positions taken by Honduran Pete and his band of rebels, all former Sandinista soldiers who occupied the northern city of Esteli to press their demands for land. But Honduran Pete was not concerned, his wife recalled later. "I warned him, get out of there!" Zoila Altamirano said. "He said, no, they won't do anything to us. They are Sandinistas, just like us." And that was Honduran Pete's mistake.
NEWS
April 19, 1997 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Barely 100 days into his right-wing administration, President Arnoldo Aleman has been forced to do exactly what he criticized his moderate predecessor for doing: cede privileges to the far left. All week, about 5,000 demonstrators heeded the call of the leftist Sandinista National Liberation Front, the largest opposition political party, to block highways across the country in protest of Aleman's free-market economic policies.
NEWS
October 25, 1992 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Sandinista National Liberation Front, united throughout a decade in power and while fighting a U.S.-backed guerrilla war, is torn today by internal debate over its role as an opposition party and its political future. Like leftists everywhere, the Sandinistas are searching for an identity after the collapse of the Soviet Bloc.
NEWS
October 25, 1992 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Sandinista National Liberation Front, united throughout a decade in power and while fighting a U.S.-backed guerrilla war, is torn today by internal debate over its role as an opposition party and its political future. Like leftists everywhere, the Sandinistas are searching for an identity after the collapse of the Soviet Bloc.
NEWS
October 11, 1992 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In President Violeta Barrios de Chamorro's Nicaragua, everything has changed and nothing has changed. Or does it just seem that way? Toyotas outnumber Russian-made Ladas now, but they still have to steer around horse-drawn carts--about 70% of Nicaraguans live in poverty. The mayor of Managua has put up road signs to the country club and airport. But many streets remain nameless, and Managuans' memories are still dotted with landmarks that no longer exist. Nicaragua remains a polarized country.
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