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Sandip Ray

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ENTERTAINMENT
October 2, 1995 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There's a great deal of the late Satyajit Ray, India's foremost filmmaker, in his son Sandip: wit, charm, good looks, impeccable manners. But there's also a more important quality: the clear sense you have that he's his own man. For more than 10 years, Sandip Ray, 41, has been a successful director, and Filmhaus will release "The Broken Journey," his third theatrical feature--and the first to receive U.S. distribution--Wednesday at the Monica 4-Plex.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 2006 | From the Associated Press
The son of the late Indian filmmaker Satyajit Ray is making a movie marking 40 years since the creation of one of his father's most famous characters, a detective named Feluda. Ray, who won an honorary Academy Award in 1991 and died in 1992, wrote some 35 stories about Feluda, beginning in 1966. Ray's son, Sandip, told the Times of India his new film is based on one called "Tintoretto's Jesus."
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 1995 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When India's great filmmaker Satyajit Ray was stricken with heart disease, he became all too aware that only the rich could afford good medical care for even the simplest treatments. As he recuperated, he determined to address this problem and commenced writing a script, "The Broken Journey," that he believed would be "his best and most important film yet."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 1995 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When India's great filmmaker Satyajit Ray was stricken with heart disease, he became all too aware that only the rich could afford good medical care for even the simplest treatments. As he recuperated, he determined to address this problem and commenced writing a script, "The Broken Journey," that he believed would be "his best and most important film yet."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 2006 | From the Associated Press
The son of the late Indian filmmaker Satyajit Ray is making a movie marking 40 years since the creation of one of his father's most famous characters, a detective named Feluda. Ray, who won an honorary Academy Award in 1991 and died in 1992, wrote some 35 stories about Feluda, beginning in 1966. Ray's son, Sandip, told the Times of India his new film is based on one called "Tintoretto's Jesus."
ENTERTAINMENT
January 1, 1997
More than 50 films, including the Los Angeles premiere of "Follow Me Home" starring Alfre Woodard, will be showcased Jan. 29 through Feb. 9 at the fifth annual Pan African Film Festival at the Magic Johnson Theaters in the Baldwin Hills Crenshaw Plaza at Crenshaw and Martin Luther King boulevards. Peter Bratt directed the Emmy Award-winning Woodard, who is also among a dozen honorary co-chairs of the festival.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 7, 1993 | MICHAEL DUNCAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In the art of movie-making, it is the director's job to make a script visual. And sometimes the easiest way to prepare for the cameras is to pick up a pencil and draw the scene. Presumably inspired over dinner, director Alfred Hitchcock sketched the setup for the great Mt. Rushmore cafeteria scene in "North by Northwest" on the back of a Sheraton Hotel paper place mat.
WORLD
September 8, 2012 | By Mark Magnier, Los Angeles Times
KOLKATA, India - The dusty files, manual typewriter, aging books and film reels in metal tins languish in Satyajit Ray's study, largely the way the filmmaker left them on his death two decades ago. Among the most creative Bengalis of modern times, Ray directed 37 films and wrote 75 short stories when he wasn't publishing, illustrating, composing and writing critiques. A few weeks before his death, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences paid tribute to his life with an honorary Oscar.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 27, 1985 | KEVIN THOMAS
Thirty years ago, Satyajit Ray, a Calcutta advertising man, sold or pawned all his worldly goods to make "Pather Panchali," which became the first installment in an epic family trilogy. It took the special jury prize at the Cannes Film Festival in 1956. Not all of Ray's subsequent films have received much exposure.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 2, 1995 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There's a great deal of the late Satyajit Ray, India's foremost filmmaker, in his son Sandip: wit, charm, good looks, impeccable manners. But there's also a more important quality: the clear sense you have that he's his own man. For more than 10 years, Sandip Ray, 41, has been a successful director, and Filmhaus will release "The Broken Journey," his third theatrical feature--and the first to receive U.S. distribution--Wednesday at the Monica 4-Plex.
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