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Sandow Birk

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September 17, 1992 | CATHY CURTIS, Cathy Curtis covers art for The Times Orange County Edition.
In Sandow Birk's brash updates of 18- and 19th-Century paintings of historical events, contemporary urban violence and not-so-quiet desperation are translated into a weird fusion of straight-arrow realism, stagy tableaux and eye-popping visual effects. A selection of these recent canvases, along with a Los Angeles riot-themed version by Birk and ceramic artist Stephen Rivers of Auguste Rodin's "Gates of Hell," are at the Orange Coast College Art Gallery through Oct. 1.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 23, 2009 | Sharon Mizota
There's a long tradition of illustrating scenes from the Bible -- even a version of Genesis by alternative comics master R. Crumb. But the Koran, which Muslims consider to be the holy word of God, has never incorporated images of people or animals, according to Linda Komaroff, curator of Islamic art at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. "It simply wasn't the kind of thing that would come up," she said, "In Islam, like Judaism, there's one...
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 19, 2005 | Leah Ollman, Special to The Times
In spite of its title, "Leading Causes of Death in America" is actually a fairly upbeat series of work, according to artist Sandow Birk. Most subjects that Birk gravitates to -- gang violence, the growing prison population, rampant consumerism -- have the potential to dismay if not depress, but he leavens his work with wit and the reassurance of the familiar. Birk is an irreverent mixer of the mythic and the mundane.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 10, 2007 | Sharon Mizota, Special to The Times
Sandow Birk's painting "In Days of War" depicts a young man hunched before a large, blank canvas. The studio is littered with paint splatters and other signs of artistic activity, but instead of a brush, the artist holds a newspaper in his hands. Birk describes the image as "the daily confrontation of sitting down and trying to figure out, with all these things happening, what can you do."
ENTERTAINMENT
December 10, 2007 | Sharon Mizota, Special to The Times
Sandow Birk's painting "In Days of War" depicts a young man hunched before a large, blank canvas. The studio is littered with paint splatters and other signs of artistic activity, but instead of a brush, the artist holds a newspaper in his hands. Birk describes the image as "the daily confrontation of sitting down and trying to figure out, with all these things happening, what can you do."
ENTERTAINMENT
September 1, 1989 | SUVAN GEER
Sandow Birk makes surprising paintings using acrylic paint on black velvet. Surprising because they can be interesting, despite immediate associations with cheap Tijuana bullfighter pictures. Even though they lack Peter Alexander's aplomb in dealing with the same material, the calculated unease of the images holds our attention. It's a weirdly evolving mixture of street kitsch and Edward Hopper isolation. Birk uses velvet to mimic the light-absorbing canvas of night.
NEWS
March 25, 2004 | David Pagel, Special to The Times
Art exhibitions designed to clear up misconceptions about the nature of reality often begin by painting a simplistic picture of the world. They then demonstrate, with illustrative displays of like-minded works, that things are more complicated than that. If you're gullible enough to fall for the straw target, you'll probably be impressed by the corrective insights such shows serve up.
MAGAZINE
February 16, 2003 | RICHARD E. CHEVERTON, Richard E. Cheverton's last story for the magazine was about art critic David Hickey.
It seems like the setup for a joke with a sagging punch line: Two surfers get together in a bar and, having nothing better to do, decide to illustrate and rewrite Dante Alighieri's "The Divine Comedy." Which, in fact, they did--undaunted that they were about to wrestle with a pillar upon which the European literary tradition has been built, as any freshman Western Civ student will tell you.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 23, 2009 | Sharon Mizota
There's a long tradition of illustrating scenes from the Bible -- even a version of Genesis by alternative comics master R. Crumb. But the Koran, which Muslims consider to be the holy word of God, has never incorporated images of people or animals, according to Linda Komaroff, curator of Islamic art at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. "It simply wasn't the kind of thing that would come up," she said, "In Islam, like Judaism, there's one...
NEWS
December 15, 2007
Art show images: The images published with an article in Monday's Calendar section about Sandow Birk's "Depravities of War" exhibition at Cal State Long Beach were incorrectly credited. Birk's "Repercussion" was courtesy of the artist and University Art Museum, Cal State Long Beach. The image of Jacques Callot's "The Hospital" was from the collection of the UCLA Grunwald Center for the Graphic Arts, Hammer Museum.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 19, 2005 | Leah Ollman, Special to The Times
In spite of its title, "Leading Causes of Death in America" is actually a fairly upbeat series of work, according to artist Sandow Birk. Most subjects that Birk gravitates to -- gang violence, the growing prison population, rampant consumerism -- have the potential to dismay if not depress, but he leavens his work with wit and the reassurance of the familiar. Birk is an irreverent mixer of the mythic and the mundane.
NEWS
March 25, 2004 | David Pagel, Special to The Times
Art exhibitions designed to clear up misconceptions about the nature of reality often begin by painting a simplistic picture of the world. They then demonstrate, with illustrative displays of like-minded works, that things are more complicated than that. If you're gullible enough to fall for the straw target, you'll probably be impressed by the corrective insights such shows serve up.
MAGAZINE
February 16, 2003 | RICHARD E. CHEVERTON, Richard E. Cheverton's last story for the magazine was about art critic David Hickey.
It seems like the setup for a joke with a sagging punch line: Two surfers get together in a bar and, having nothing better to do, decide to illustrate and rewrite Dante Alighieri's "The Divine Comedy." Which, in fact, they did--undaunted that they were about to wrestle with a pillar upon which the European literary tradition has been built, as any freshman Western Civ student will tell you.
NEWS
September 17, 1992 | CATHY CURTIS, Cathy Curtis covers art for The Times Orange County Edition.
In Sandow Birk's brash updates of 18- and 19th-Century paintings of historical events, contemporary urban violence and not-so-quiet desperation are translated into a weird fusion of straight-arrow realism, stagy tableaux and eye-popping visual effects. A selection of these recent canvases, along with a Los Angeles riot-themed version by Birk and ceramic artist Stephen Rivers of Auguste Rodin's "Gates of Hell," are at the Orange Coast College Art Gallery through Oct. 1.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 1, 1989 | SUVAN GEER
Sandow Birk makes surprising paintings using acrylic paint on black velvet. Surprising because they can be interesting, despite immediate associations with cheap Tijuana bullfighter pictures. Even though they lack Peter Alexander's aplomb in dealing with the same material, the calculated unease of the images holds our attention. It's a weirdly evolving mixture of street kitsch and Edward Hopper isolation. Birk uses velvet to mimic the light-absorbing canvas of night.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 29, 1998
* "John Huggins: Polagrids"--Huggins' "Stars and Stripes#1," made up of 88 Polaroid transfers, is on display at Craig Krull Gallery, one of three photography exhibitions. * "This Side of Eden--Images of Steinbeck's California"--The exhibition continues at the Laguna Art Museum in Laguna Beach through Jan. 3. * "Sandow Birk: In Smog and Thunder, Historical Works From the Great War of the Californias"--Exhibition of parodies of historical paintings ends Saturday at Koplin Gallery.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 26, 1994
Los Angeles-based painters Maura Lynn Bendett, Sandow Birk and Kevin Miller, and L.A. video artist Jean Rasenberger are among 30 artists chosen by the Western States Arts Federation to receive 1994 WESTAF/National Endowment for the Arts Regional Fellowships in Visual Arts. Each artist receives a $5,000 cash award and will have their work featured in a four-color catalogue to be distributed nationally in the fall of 1994.
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