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Sandra Baldwin

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December 13, 2001 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. Olympic Committee President Sandra Baldwin was formally nominated Wednesday for membership in the International Olympic Committee in a process that highlighted the geographic and gender issues confronting the IOC, which insists it is seeking a more diverse membership. Baldwin, 62, was nominated to replace former USOC president Bill Hybl. She is widely expected to be confirmed as a member at IOC elections held in conjunction with the Salt Lake City Games in February.
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May 25, 2002 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sandra Baldwin resigned Friday as president of the U.S. Olympic Committee, a day after admitting to discrepancies in her USOC biography, including the listing of a doctorate in American literature that she does not possess. Baldwin, 62, of Mesa, Ariz., the first female president in USOC history, tendered her resignation following a lengthy conference call involving the USOC's policy-making executive committee. The call settled nothing.
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SPORTS
December 4, 2000 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a historic first for one of America's most traditional institutions, Arizona businesswoman Sandra Baldwin was elected Sunday as chair of the United States Olympic Committee. Under the 115-member USOC board of director's complicated weighted voting system, Baldwin defeated Boston attorney Paul George, 108-96. She will serve as USOC chair until 2004. Baldwin, 61, is the first woman in the USOC's 106-year history to hold the top rung in its complex organizational structure.
SPORTS
December 13, 2001 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. Olympic Committee President Sandra Baldwin was formally nominated Wednesday for membership in the International Olympic Committee in a process that highlighted the geographic and gender issues confronting the IOC, which insists it is seeking a more diverse membership. Baldwin, 62, was nominated to replace former USOC president Bill Hybl. She is widely expected to be confirmed as a member at IOC elections held in conjunction with the Salt Lake City Games in February.
SPORTS
May 25, 2002 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sandra Baldwin resigned Friday as president of the U.S. Olympic Committee, a day after admitting to discrepancies in her USOC biography, including the listing of a doctorate in American literature that she does not possess. Baldwin, 62, of Mesa, Ariz., the first female president in USOC history, tendered her resignation following a lengthy conference call involving the USOC's policy-making executive committee. The call settled nothing.
SPORTS
May 24, 2002
A change in the status of U.S. Olympic Committee President Sandra Baldwin could bring a renewal in efforts by the Los Angeles bid committee to bring the Summer Olympics to L.A. in 2012. Last fall, the USOC chose New York, Houston, Washington and San Francisco as semifinalists in the race to be the United States' candidate before International Olympic Committee voters for the 2012 Games. The Los Angeles bid was eliminated and its committee disbanded.
SPORTS
February 23, 2001 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON
In an unexpected turnaround, the U.S. Olympic Committee is due today to reconsider whether it ought to give interim CEO Scott Blackmun the job permanently and forgo the nationwide search it opted last month to undertake. Blackmun, 43, a former USOC general counsel, has held the interim tag since October, when CEO Norm Blake stepped down.
SPORTS
June 10, 1996 | RANDY HARVEY
Bill Hybl of Colorado Springs, Colo., who served as interim president of the U.S. Olympic Committee in 1991-'92, has been selected by a nominating committee to become the organization's next president, sources told the Times. Other officer candidates to be recommended by the USOC-appointed nominating committee are Sandra Baldwin of Phoenix, Herman Frazier of Tempe, Ariz., and Paul George of Wellesley, Mass.
SPORTS
June 17, 1995 | RANDY HARVEY
The celebration at U.S. Olympic Committee headquarters in Colorado Springs, Colo., when Salt Lake City was awarded the 2002 Winter Games on Friday was mixed with a profound sense of relief.
SPORTS
October 25, 2001 | Alan Abrahamson
Three days after losing a bid to stay on as chief executive of the U.S. Olympic Committee, Scott Blackmun said Wednesday he is leaving the organization. Blackmun, 44, a lawyer, served for the past year as interim CEO of the USOC. On Sunday the USOC's policy-making executive board selected Lloyd Ward, the former head of Maytag Corp., as its new CEO. The vote was 13-8. Ward formally takes over Nov. 1. Blackmun had been urged by some supporters to stay on in another role with the USOC.
SPORTS
December 4, 2000 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a historic first for one of America's most traditional institutions, Arizona businesswoman Sandra Baldwin was elected Sunday as chair of the United States Olympic Committee. Under the 115-member USOC board of director's complicated weighted voting system, Baldwin defeated Boston attorney Paul George, 108-96. She will serve as USOC chair until 2004. Baldwin, 61, is the first woman in the USOC's 106-year history to hold the top rung in its complex organizational structure.
SPORTS
June 9, 1992 | RANDY HARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
LeRoy Walker, former chancellor of North Carolina Central University and now a vice president of Atlanta's organizing committee for the 1996 Summer Olympics, has been recommended by a nominating committee to become the U.S. Olympic Committee's next president. If Walker is elected by the board of directors during a session in October, he will become the USOC's first black president. Also recommended by the nominating committee were George Steinbrenner of Tampa, Fla.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 28, 2001 | From Associated Press
Hal Haig Prieste, America's oldest Olympian who, in a youthful prank, once stole the original Olympic flag, has died at 104. Prieste died April 19 at the Sunbridge Health Care Center in Camden, N.J., the U.S. Olympic Committee said. In his later years, Prieste had to use a wheelchair most of the time. He also had trouble hearing and was going blind.
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