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Sandra Cisneros

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ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 2014 | By Carolyn Kellogg
With her latest "Have You Seen Marie?," Sandra Cisneros has written a picture book for adults (and kids too). It's not what readers expected from Cisneros, who leaped onto the literary scene in 1984 with "The House on Mango Street" and continued with an acclaimed literary career. Her 1991 collection, "Woman Hollering Creek and Other Stories," was a finalist for the L.A. Times Book Prize; her many awards include a MacArthur "Genius" Fellowship. Creating an illustrated book, she tells the L.A. Times' Hector Tobar, was a little like working on a film.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 2014 | By Carolyn Kellogg
With her latest "Have You Seen Marie?," Sandra Cisneros has written a picture book for adults (and kids too). It's not what readers expected from Cisneros, who leaped onto the literary scene in 1984 with "The House on Mango Street" and continued with an acclaimed literary career. Her 1991 collection, "Woman Hollering Creek and Other Stories," was a finalist for the L.A. Times Book Prize; her many awards include a MacArthur "Genius" Fellowship. Creating an illustrated book, she tells the L.A. Times' Hector Tobar, was a little like working on a film.
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BOOKS
October 31, 1999
On Day of the Dead I ask you to come home with me to see my altar. That's a better line than come and see my etchings. It works. You do come, like the spirits that night. You follow the cempazuchil petals and make your way to my door, that door abandoned and solitary a full year. You make your way and say you've been sad, and I say I've been sad too, because it's true, I have. The ghost of the one before you alive and haunting my heart, and I want and long for release from the hurting.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 2013 | By Hector Tobar
Sandra Cisneros' first novel, "The House on Mango Street," has sold more than 5 million copies. A coming-of-age story, it's that rare book that can be assigned to grade-school children and college students, and it's been translated into several languages (the Spanish translation was the work of the great Mexican essayist, journalist and novelist Elena Poniatowska). But Cisneros first published "The House on Mango Street" in 1984 (with the University of Houston-based Arte Publico Press )
BOOKS
May 15, 1994
Not like this. Not tonight, a white stone. When you're 36 and seething like sixteen next to the telephone, and you don't know where. And worse--with whom? I don't care for this fruit. This Mexican love hidden in the boot. This knotted braid. Birthcord buried beneath the knuckle of the heart. Cat at the window scratching at the windswept moon scurrying along, scurrying along. Rattling trees. Screen doors banging raspy. Brain a whorl of swirling fish. Oh, I don't like this. I don't like this.
BOOKS
April 28, 1991 | Barbara Kingsolver, Kingsolver's most recent novel is "Animal Dreams." Her first poetry collection, "Another America," is forthcoming
From poetry to fiction and back doesn't seem too long a stretch for some writers. Linda Hogan's recently published "Mean Spirit" was a first novel, but the author's reputation runs long and deep in the tiny community of North Americans who buy and read poetry. Louise Erdrich is well known for her novels, but once upon a time she was (and surely still is) a poet.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 7, 1991 | SHEILA BENSON, CRITIC AT LARGE
As a fresh, unfettered Chicana author read her stories last week, two images intruded persistently. One was a photograph dominating a Sunday New York Times business section: five women at the top of Turtle Bay Books, "Random House's Glitzy New Imprint." The quintet radiated optimism, unanimity and power. The second was the optimism, unanimity and power onstage at a UC Santa Barbara symposium last month, as five Chicana artists debated the danger of becoming the "unique other" of their community.
MAGAZINE
August 19, 1990
I think it's a good thing Ethan Canin left medical school to be a story writer. Judging from "The Scientific Method" (yawn, ho-hum), he might have become dangerous and been a doctor. Thanks for the Sandra Cisneros piece, "Woman Hollering Creek"; that was sensational. E. FLOYD SHERMAN Encino
BOOKS
December 27, 1992 | SUSAN SALTER REYNOLDS
MY WICKED WICKED WAYS by Sandra Cisneros (Turtle Bay Books: $15; 103 pp.). There's some meat on the bones of Sandra Cisneros' poetry but it's dark meat. These are poems, she writes in her poem-preface, "I wrote when I was sad./ . . . With nothing in the texts to tell me." In this collection, Cisneros writes her own text, and perhaps it would serve for other women as well.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 2013 | By Hector Tobar
Sandra Cisneros' first novel, "The House on Mango Street," has sold more than 5 million copies. A coming-of-age story, it's that rare book that can be assigned to grade-school children and college students, and it's been translated into several languages (the Spanish translation was the work of the great Mexican essayist, journalist and novelist Elena Poniatowska). But Cisneros first published "The House on Mango Street" in 1984 (with the University of Houston-based Arte Publico Press )
BOOKS
September 29, 2002 | JANE CIABATTARI, Jane Ciabattari is the author of the short-story collection "Stealing the Fire."
It has been nearly 20 years since Sandra Cisneros' acclaimed first novel, "The House on Mango Street," a coming-of-age story told in poetic vignettes, brought her unique voice and the Chicana experience to millions of American readers. High school and college students in particular found her first novel authentic and simpatico. Her 1991 short story collection, "Woman Hollering Creek," offered a wider range of voices, a broader scope.
NEWS
September 13, 2002 | JENNIFER MENA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a painted Mexican trunk upstairs in her bright violet house in San Antonio, Sandra Cisneros, the godmother of Chicana literature, keeps her Mexican scarves rolled on broomsticks to prevent wrinkling. These woven treasures, known in Spanish as rebozos, provided the central image for her new epic novel, "Caramelo," to be published Sept. 24 in English and Spanish by Knopf.
BOOKS
October 31, 1999
On Day of the Dead I ask you to come home with me to see my altar. That's a better line than come and see my etchings. It works. You do come, like the spirits that night. You follow the cempazuchil petals and make your way to my door, that door abandoned and solitary a full year. You make your way and say you've been sad, and I say I've been sad too, because it's true, I have. The ghost of the one before you alive and haunting my heart, and I want and long for release from the hurting.
BOOKS
May 15, 1994
Not like this. Not tonight, a white stone. When you're 36 and seething like sixteen next to the telephone, and you don't know where. And worse--with whom? I don't care for this fruit. This Mexican love hidden in the boot. This knotted braid. Birthcord buried beneath the knuckle of the heart. Cat at the window scratching at the windswept moon scurrying along, scurrying along. Rattling trees. Screen doors banging raspy. Brain a whorl of swirling fish. Oh, I don't like this. I don't like this.
BOOKS
December 27, 1992 | SUSAN SALTER REYNOLDS
MY WICKED WICKED WAYS by Sandra Cisneros (Turtle Bay Books: $15; 103 pp.). There's some meat on the bones of Sandra Cisneros' poetry but it's dark meat. These are poems, she writes in her poem-preface, "I wrote when I was sad./ . . . With nothing in the texts to tell me." In this collection, Cisneros writes her own text, and perhaps it would serve for other women as well.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 7, 1991 | SHEILA BENSON, CRITIC AT LARGE
As a fresh, unfettered Chicana author read her stories last week, two images intruded persistently. One was a photograph dominating a Sunday New York Times business section: five women at the top of Turtle Bay Books, "Random House's Glitzy New Imprint." The quintet radiated optimism, unanimity and power. The second was the optimism, unanimity and power onstage at a UC Santa Barbara symposium last month, as five Chicana artists debated the danger of becoming the "unique other" of their community.
NEWS
September 13, 2002 | JENNIFER MENA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a painted Mexican trunk upstairs in her bright violet house in San Antonio, Sandra Cisneros, the godmother of Chicana literature, keeps her Mexican scarves rolled on broomsticks to prevent wrinkling. These woven treasures, known in Spanish as rebozos, provided the central image for her new epic novel, "Caramelo," to be published Sept. 24 in English and Spanish by Knopf.
BOOKS
April 28, 1991 | Barbara Kingsolver, Kingsolver's most recent novel is "Animal Dreams." Her first poetry collection, "Another America," is forthcoming
From poetry to fiction and back doesn't seem too long a stretch for some writers. Linda Hogan's recently published "Mean Spirit" was a first novel, but the author's reputation runs long and deep in the tiny community of North Americans who buy and read poetry. Louise Erdrich is well known for her novels, but once upon a time she was (and surely still is) a poet.
MAGAZINE
August 19, 1990
I congratulate Sandra Cisneros for her masterpiece of derogatory terms against Hispanic immigrants, especially Mexicans, in her "Woman Hollering Creek." Cisneros must have a superiority complex when she looks at other persons of her own race. Her story concentrates on searching out the wrong behavior of new immigrants. The unnecessary abuse of the Spanish language while she is writing in English makes her story look even more grotesque and awkward. It seems like Cisneros is ashamed of her ancestors, their traditions, their "criminal" ignorance and their mistaken habits.
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